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46

On a pilot-vs-FBW system perspective, as mentioned in the comments to the question, the most notable difference is the authority priority: Boeing trusts more the pilots: they can supersede the Fly-by-wire automatic commands by exerting enough force on the controls Airbus trusts more the FBW system: if the system is fully functional ("Normal law") it will ...


45

I just wanted to comment on this question since some of my code is on the A380's GE engine. Those engines are optimized for fuel efficiency at their cruising altitude and speed. The tradeoff that you fight against when designing the engine for cruising altitude is that it makes the engine hard to start, and the stall margin (the pressure and fuel combo you ...


39

No. Firstly, as a comment noted, the takeoff was hardly "near vertical", the camera angle makes it look so. The takeoff angle in the video certainly is much steeper than a normal one, but Airbus aircraft are more than capable of doing the same - in fact an A350 did very much the same thing at the Paris Air Show. The notion that an Airbus doesn't let the ...


35

Yes. Ignoring companies that used to exist but are now bankrupt/merged into Airbus or Boeing, you have companies from countries that aren't historically too friendly with the US and Western Europe. For instance, Tupolev makes the Tu-204, which is currently in production and seats over 175 passengers. The Ilyushin-designed Il-96 is a widebody in current use ...


35

If the engines are upgraded to "better" ones, the manufacturer would make it result in increased carrying capacity or increased range (or both), but not increased speed. The limitation is the airframe. If you try to push it faster, you will run into aerodynamic problems, for example part of the flow is supersonic around certain areas of the wing. It is ...


33

According to Ask the Pilot: Almost every frequent flyer has encountered this sound at one time or another. [...] It happens on twin-engine Airbus models: the A320 series (includes the subvariants A319 and A321) and the larger A330. [...] What you hear is a device called the power transfer unit, or PTU, which is designed to ensure adequate ...


33

I like to train being able to determine the precise model of an aircraft. I first try to tell if it's a Boeing or Airbus, and then I look at other details to determine the model. The idea is to learn several differences : cockpit windows shape (Boeing has an very specific angle) ; nose shape (pointy nose on Boeing, "fat nose" on Airbus) ; wingtips (...


32

The sidestick was a design that came about along with the new fly-by-wire technology of the A320 in the late 1980's. The physical leverage of a yoke was no longer needed for flight control cables. The older designs of the A300 and A310 series planes from the 70's and 80's have conventional yoke flight controls. I would not be surprised to see inaccuracies ...


32

You can only hire so many people at one place, and also only find so much land there, so when the whole process no longer fits, there is no other option than start building components at other places and move them to the final assembly place. In part, it is also historical. Airbus, but to an extent Boeing too, was formed by mergers of smaller companies as ...


31

As far as I read in various documents about A320 and remember them correctly: There are three systems handling different parts of the primary flight control: ELAC (elevator & aileron computer) controls pitch with elevators+trim and roll with ailerons. SEC (spoiler & elevator computer) controls roll with spoilers and if ELACs fail, pitch with ...


30

The question is vague, not specifying on which Boeing and Airbus pair the problem lies on. For example Boeing 377 Stratocruiser is also a Boeing but I think there is very small possibility for someone to confuse it to an Airbus. Having said that, I consider a random pair of comparable aircraft, A320 (the left) and B734 (the right). Nose B734 has a more ...


30

I believe this is a hoax1. I've read through several documents describing the protections provided by Airbus flight laws (this is not autopilot; autopilot is a separate layer on top of it) and have never seen any mention of any kind of ground proximity protection. Only standard (E)GPWS which yells "terrain, pull up". Update: Of course now there is EGPWS ...


30

From Flight Training International: Airbus A320 Type Rating The Airbus A320 family of jet airliners consists of five aircraft: the A318, A319, A320, A321 jet airliners and ACJ business jet. Only one type rating is required to fly these Airbus aircraft, as they have similar flight decks. To earn a type rating for these Airbus ...


29

General Reasons There are three main reasons for having multiple ailerons per wing on large aircraft: Aileron Reversal On a large aircraft, at high speeds a deflected aileron can twist the wing enough to cause a net roll torque opposite to the one intended. The further out on the wing an aileron is, the more likely this problem is to arise. For high-...


29

From the A320 Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM): And the image to text: On ground, hot weather conditions may cause overheating to be detected around the bleed ducts in the wings, resulting in “AIR L (R) WING LEAK” warnings. Such warnings may be avoided during transit by keeping the slats in Configuration 1 when the OAT is above 30 °C. (Emphasis mine) ...


28

Being used but out of production: Ilyushin Il-62 (up to 195 seats): last one built in 2010. Totally built 287, 13 remain in service Tupolev Tu-154 (up to 176 seats): last one built in 2013. Totally built 923, 61 remain in service Ilyushin Il-86 (up to 350 seats): last one built in 1995, since 2011 only in military use. Totally built 106, 4 remain in service ...


28

This airplane is based on the Airbus A300-600. The maximum take-off weight of the aircraft is 155 tonne as published in the wikipedia. In addition, the the manufacturer has published the Aircraft Characteristics for the base aircraft. If we assume that the aircraft low-aerodynamic aerodynamic characteristics has not been changed for the take-off phase (...


26

Boeing aircraft primarily feature a traditional "yoke" system, which allows pilots to directly control the plane: In contrast, Airbus aircraft use a "fly-by-wire" system via a joystick which transmits electrical signals to control the plane: Airbus aircraft limit pilots' capabilities in situations that require extreme action to be taken; the computer may ...


23

The Airbus is actually configured the same as the vast majority of other General Aviation and Civil Aviation aircraft. The key factor is that the throttle is almost always the middle - meaning that as pilots get used to sitting in the left seat early on in their training, they become accustomed to using the throttle with their right hand and the control ...


20

Big difference is on Boeing with a yoke, it is like two linked steering wheels in a car. The pilot not flying can easily see what the other pilot is doing with his controls, as the yoke in front of him moves along with the other pilot's inputs. On the airbus models with a side stick, the pilot not flying cannot see what the other pilot is asking of the ...


19

The answer to this is, in part to do with corporate culture and part aerodynamics. The corporate culture and history part is that Boeing have always built their noses that way and senior engineers have a tendancy to return to designs they have used successfully before. If you look at the nose of a 747 and the nose of B-17 you'll see some distictive ...


19

Since you are trying to understand how the crew is aware of law reconfiguration, it's important to look at this event in its context, why it does happen and what are the consequences for the control of the aircraft. You may skip this overview and go to the direct answer to your question which is in the last section of this post. Flight control system and ...


19

Short answer: To create a funnel for all the air streaming towards the fuselage. Slightly longer answer: Air approaching a swept wing will be accelerated towards the area with the lowest pressure and, therefore, will be sucked towards the wing's center. The center itself will show a markedly different pressure distribution over chord than the two-...


19

There are two sorts of "autopilots", and it is important to make a distinction between the two. One is for the behaviour of the aircraft around its Centre of Gravity (CoG), the other one is for defining the path of the CoG. The Inner Loop autopilot: behaviour around CoG, or the aircraft attitude control. This autopilot should not be called autopilot since ...


19

14600 ft and 7300 ft. A320 FCOM DSC-31-45 : Minimum and maximum elevations encountered ahead of the aircraft, within the selected ND range.


19

There are many considerations in where parts are manufactured or assembled, and not all are directly related to economics. Both Boeing and Airbus have assembly lines located around the world, so it can make more sense to consolidate production of components in one place. Manufacturing large parts requires a huge investment in tooling and machinery. For ...


18

Airbus (A320+; A300 and A310 have traditional controls) uses flight control laws. In flight, the side-stick input does not indicate desired position of control surfaces, but desired wing loading and roll rate. The flight computer takes care of trimming the aircraft for straight flight at current speed and balance. Boeing uses traditional controls, where the ...


18

All Airbus aircraft from the A320 onwards currently do not have an method of disabling lateral or pitch control without the full disconnection of the autopilot. In the case that one of the controls fail, the autopilot will also disconnect. In the case of the autopilot disconnecting fully, Airbus aircraft have an audible "cavalry charge" which sounds for 3 ...


18

Has Airbus planned to build a larger version of the A380? Yes, In 2012 they planned to build a larger version of the A380. "Airbus says 1,000 seat A380 due 2020" However, manufacturers do change plans from time to time, sometimes in response to market conditions. "Has planned" is not necessarily the same as "is planning". Those plans are not currently (...


18

A backlog of orders does not indicate a manufacturing problem. Quite opposite, it is good for the business as it adds stability. Airbus outpaced Boeing on every aircraft expect the A350/787 last year. Producing all of the backlog in one year is not a good idea, as investments into the production line would be enormous and after a year, utilization of the ...


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