40

No. Firstly, as a comment noted, the takeoff was hardly "near vertical", the camera angle makes it look so. The takeoff angle in the video certainly is much steeper than a normal one, but Airbus aircraft are more than capable of doing the same - in fact an A350 did very much the same thing at the Paris Air Show. The notion that an Airbus doesn't let the ...


37

Here's a better picture showing all probes, and labeled: Link to original, high-resolution, unnumbered picture They are: Ice detector Multi-function probe 1 Static port TAT probe Side-slip vane Pitot probe Angle-of-attack vane Airbus.com has a PDF (pdf page 125) about the various probes. 1 As the name suggests, the multi-function probes record different ...


33

The fact that it is a single deck, twin engined aircraft with that distinctive wingtip confirm that it is an Airbus A350, operated by Lufthansa. The -900 series is the only A350 in service at this time, and Lufthansa has not ordered the -1000 series. The A350 is powered by Rolls Royce Trent XWB engines.


33

It is never “the first time”. What he is really saying is that after many hours of flying the aircraft (or an approved simulator) this is the first time doing a revenue flight with passengers. Previous flights would have been training flights. When a new aircraft type is first introduced to an airline, it can be expected that the entire crew is doing their ...


30

Short answer These are the three redundant temperature sensors for the windscreen anti icing and defogging system. The design is similar to what is found on the A330 and A340, and most large aircraft. The sensors are used to control the electric current in the heating film(s) sandwiched in the windscreen ply. Usually three temperatures are monitored: Outer ...


24

The short answer is that it's what the market wanted. There is always a lot of discussions between the airlines and manufacturer's before Airbus or Boeing commits to building a new aircraft. In this case both Boeing and Airbus came to the same decision -- the airlines were being driven by one single factor to replace their A320 or B737 fleets, they just ...


16

Just to point out the obvious: This got me thinking, does it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together You don't even have to know anything about aviation to be able to answer this question. You can answer this question with common sense and basic logic: If it's a new aircraft type, then by definition, nobody ...


15

To add to Gerry's answer (and this will be slightly too long for a comment), there is a huge disadvantage to drastically changing the cockpit when going from an A320 to the A320 NEO or from a B737-300 to the B737-700, or 737 NG to 737 Max, and that has to do with the existing fleets. If you keep the cockpit basically the same and just add what new switches ...


14

It looks like your image came from this article, since they have the exact same one. According to Boeing, this is the most practical place, and Airbus has finally decided they agree. For the first time in Airbus aircraft –and after benchmarked[sic] Boeing´s configuration-, the A350 XWB’s crew rest compartments are in the aircraft crown.--All images and ...


14

[D]oes it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together [...]? Yes, it does. In fact, it happened in exactly that flight you linked: Found out that it was the first passenger flight for all of us pilots, but everything went perfect thanks to Scandinavian cooperation and teamwork. (YouTube video description, ...


13

That is the drain mast and breather outlet combined. There's some discussion about this in airliners.net (not the same engine, but I sure they are similar): The exhaust from the air/oil separator goes out here. Usually hot air, but when the engine is running at idle you can see smoke coming out. This is engine oil that has got past the seals. The smoke ...


13

According to Civil Avionics Systems, such system is found on the Airbus A350, A380, Boeing 787, and new business jets. But only certain systems use the variable frequency (VF) AC. Namely motors such as in the fuel and hydraulic systems. They are designed to operate at different speeds with tolerances allowed for the slowest modes of operation. In short, the ...


12

The landing gears are manufactured by Messier-Dowty, a Safran group company. According to their site, Safran Landing Systems is responsible for the design, development, qualification testing, manufacture and support of the main landing gear for the A350-900 aircraft. Also, Safran Landing Systems also provides wheel and carbon brakes for the A350, as ...


11

Not specific to aviation but general electric equipment: AC with a consistent frequency is important whenever you transmit power through solenoids directly fed from mains voltage. Now, traditionally, this included almost everything except primitive devices based on resistive heating (including light bulbs). Motors obviously need to generate alternating ...


11

The gold tint on the 787 window is a conductive coating for de-icing. Dreamliner jet flight-deck crews will view the world through commercial aviation's largest windshields by PPG, kept clear of fog and ice with gold and indium-tin oxide heating systems. source The A350 also has a windshield anti-ice system. It is referred to in this answer. One thing ...


10

Polar curves for older airliners can be found in lecture notes or technical publications. The drag polars of the most recent ones, where no independent measurement is yet possible, are a closely guarded secret. If you see something, it will be restricted such that an important part of the puzzle is missing. For the polars to be meaningful, you need aircraft ...


10

My answer considers EASA (European) rules. As a general rule after a transition training in simulator, there is line-flight training in real aircraft. That is flying with (experienced) instructor, although there are passengers onboard. The length of this line-flight training depends on previous experience of the trainee, but it cannot be omitted. After line-...


9

Actually the A330neo is already eating up into the A350-800 orders so much that they have abandoned it. “Their A350 strategy has failed -- they’re really down to one successful model,” Boeing Marketing Vice President Randy Tinseth told reporters at the Farnborough expo near London. “If they didn’t make this choice, they’d be headed for a 30 to 35 percent ...


9

Airbus will have it on the -1000, and will also introduce it on the -900. A350 chief engineer Alain de Zotti says the -1000 will be able to "slightly deviate" from the flight plan, if the system is activated, and leave its cruise altitude. As well as executing the high-speed manoeuvre the aircraft will automatically notify air traffic control of ...


9

You are right that wake turbulence would be a danger when flying behind another aircraft like that. The perspective of the photo makes it hard to see the actual position of the trailing aircraft relative to the ones in front of it. Pilots do this sort of thing in airshows when they fly in formation. The trailing aircraft are generally slightly below the ...


9

While payload, range, and efficiency are important for tankers, militaries have reasons for still using so many 707 variants. Many of the reasons are similar to Why does the US President fly in an obsolete 747-200? Although making an aircraft into a tanker may be less challenging than making it into a SAM aircraft, it is still a large task. The fuel system ...


9

Yes, it could be done. There is an A330 already working as fuel tanker. Image Source: Wikipedia Airbus might build a A350 air re-fueler as mentioned here: Airbus is already offering a tanker version of the A330, and could (potentially) upgrade their proposal with an A350 air-refueler. The A350 would offer a substantial increase in fuel offload from ...


8

Yes, it does appear that the airplanes behind the lead in a formation would be affected by wake turbulence. In reality, there are several factors which contribute to make it not so risky. Airplanes make the formation on high altitudes. Wake Turbulence becomes a bigger issue during takeoff and landing phases. As mentioned on Wikipedia: Wake turbulence is ...


8

The answer as to why companies seem to be favoring the 787 over the A350 is in several parts, none having very much to do with efficiency. First, a grand total of just 6 A350 XWBs have been built. The A350 is just ramping up production this year, while the 787 has been in production about 5 years now. The 787's teething problems have spurred some interest ...


8

Why is it like this and not like normally at 0 feet? Normally is not 0 feet: all Airbus (maybe with the exception of the A380, that might have a longer flare) have a "Retard" call at 20ft, not at 0ft. From the A320 Flight Crew Training Manual: As a reminder, the ”RETARD” aural alert will sound. In flare, this aural alert will occur at 20 ft, except in ...


7

Mainly because of customer concerns. Airbus, or any other aircraft manufacturer can propose a bunch of variants in its catalog, but it's the airlines that defines what aircraft are to be developed next. (On a timeline of 10 years up to 30 years - I don't recall the link, but that's Lufthansa Group's explanation.) Since the decline of the A340s and 747s, ...


7

To expand a bit on the other explanations here, "flow cones" are one of the many methods used for flow visualization. When something is being tested in a wind tunnel or in flight, you usually can't see the air flow around the body. To be able to visualize the flow, something is added to the air, like smoke, or to the body, like flow cones or tufts. Tufts ...


7

A330-900neo A350-900 Seating 287–440 325 / 173 (ULR) MTOW 251 t 280 t OEW 137 t 137 t Unit cost US$296.4 M US$317.4 M Thrust/eng 324 kN 375 kN The A330 having fewer seats means a bigger chance of high utilization on any given flight (or having high-density small seats for shorter ...


5

This is what the KCCU looks like: Source: A380-800 Flight Deck and Systems Briefing for Pilots Each KCCU is connected to its FMS: Source: A380-800 Flight Deck and Systems Briefing for Pilots From the Airbus booklet cited above: The flight crew uses the KCCU to: • Navigate through the FMS pages on the MFD • Enter and modify data on the MFD ...


5

When the two sides of the main landing gear move, each one tends to force a circle with its own radius and center, and is at the same time influenced by the nose landing gear own radius of turn. Source: A350-900 Aircraft characteristics, airport and maintenance planning Some tire sliding must occur due to the difference in circles, the actual center is ...


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