32

The sidestick was a design that came about along with the new fly-by-wire technology of the A320 in the late 1980's. The physical leverage of a yoke was no longer needed for flight control cables. The older designs of the A300 and A310 series planes from the 70's and 80's have conventional yoke flight controls. I would not be surprised to see inaccuracies ...


16

The rudder pedals are not usually used in flight, even with the autopilot off. The rudder on the Airbus A320 can be controlled via a mechanical connection to the rudder pedals in the flight deck, but also electrically via the fly-by-wire mechanism. The following graphic shows an overview of the rudder control: (Airbus A320 FCOM - Flight Controls - ...


15

It's been several years since I worked at United's flight training center, but if my memory serves me, it is there in case the system is receiving input that the pilot wants to exclude. As was explained to me, an example of this would be the other pilot becoming incapacitated, with their body leaning against the sidestick. In this case, one would want to use ...


14

I believe that there is some logic in the design, actually, even if I don't really fancy it. If you think of the traditional yoke as a control element where a certain force (or moment, rather...) results in a certain change of flight path, then if both pilots apply the same force (rather than targeting the same deflection), the resulting aircraft reaction is ...


13

Yes. Gulfstream G500 and G600 are the first civilian transport category aircraft to have active sidestick. However, instead of mechanical linkages between the two sticks, the side sticks are coupled electrically. It's much more prevalent in military aircraft. Source: Aviation Week So why isn't it being adopted by aircraft manufacturers with side stick ...


12

Side stick or no, once airborne, you never touch the rudder pedals in any airliner when flying except during landing where independent rudder inputs are used to keep the airplane lined up during the flare. The yaw damper takes care of rudder coordination for normal flying; that is, in addition to controlling yaw excursions, it compensates for adverse yaw ...


11

Why do Airbus sidesticks add their inputs? I do not work for Airbus and am not privy to their design documents, but here is what I reckon based on the over 50 real-time simulation models of aircraft flying controls I've written and tuned: Summing the outputs makes most sense in avoiding discontinuities in position input, and provides the greatest ...


9

That appears to be a button, not a trackball. From pg. 17 in a presentation, Active Stick & Throttle for F-35 - Joseph Krumenacker - NAVAIR Flight Controls / JSF Vehicle Systems - 16 October 2008, found here: It is used to engage/disengage stick sensitivity in hover. Inadvertent movement of the stick would disengage the altitude hold. Engaging that S-5 ...


9

Yes! It is feasible and recommendable, because the force sensors in fingers may create the extra inputs not available when humans are not looking at their or each others hands in emergency situations. What you describe is often applied in simulators, for instance in B737 sims where captain and F/O side column and wheel can be uncoupled: Each column has its ...


7

First of all, I'd like to make clear that I highly respect Airbus cockpit design and implementation of envelope protection. Now to the question. The Airbus side stick is a lot stronger than a game joystick and very reliable, but is functionality-wise the same as a gaming joystick, just a stick loaded by a passive spring force sending back position signals. ...


6

One of the unique aspects of Airbus fly-by-wire aircraft is that the sidesticks provide NO feedback. Because of this, the planes have an automatic trim system. Once the aircraft is pitched to a desired attitude, the pilot will then release the control stick and the aircraft will continue to fly at the selected attitude. Correspondingly, if a pilot desires ...


5

The priority button is not normally used when taking over controls from the other pilot. Even in Airbus the control hand over is done verbally. The pilot who wants the control says, 'I have controls' and the pilot who gives the control says, 'You have controls.' Or if the flying pilot wants to give the controls to the pilot monitoring, he/ she says, 'You ...


5

A prime reason for this is the fact that the Airbus sidesticks are not connected mechanically, unlike the center control columns of other aircraft. In the event of conflicting inputs from both pilots, such a condition would not be readily apparent. With mechanically connected columns, conflicting input is not possible, without both pilots being aware that ...


5

I'm not sure it exactly answers your question, but there is an excellent example of why this feature ought to always be used in an emergency situation. Air France Flight 447 was an Airbus A330, I'm not entirely certain if it had this feature (I assume so?) Anyway, it went into a stall somewhere near cruise altitude and the co-pilot, for some unknown reason,...


5

As far as I recall the priority button suppresses the other stick and autopilot. Since it is right under the thumb on the side-stick, that makes it quicker way to disconnect autopilot than navigating the other hand to the flight management panel. The overall idea is that when the pilot needs to make manual input quickly they simply push that button and it ...


5

For each takeoff in a jet like this, there is a target airspeed that is used during the climb just after takeoff. When the nose of the aircraft is first lifted, a target pitch setting is used which should get close to that airspeed. After things start to stabilize, corrections are made to the pitch in order to capture and maintain the desired airspeed. ...


5

Sidesticks are smaller than yokes. To apply a control input one only needs to turn one's wrist while a yoke requires you to use both of your arms to make the big aircraft turn. Side-sticks are used together with control laws. In an Airbus Normal Law (and Alternate Law which differs only by not providing the flight envelope protections), the system ...


5

Nothing was changed in the stick design or logic. The side stick design and logic are not addressed by the final recommendations of both accident reports. Of the issues were the training and lack of crew resource management (CRM). Recommendations toward the manufacturer, for example, are with regard to the barrage of warnings the crew of Indonesia AirAsia ...


5

If they were fighting, intentionally attempting to gain control over the stick, the pilot pressing the last would win. This differs from the situation in a cockpit with coupled controls, where the pilot who pushes hardest wins. So in an Airbus, a quick pilot wins from a strong pilot.. From the FCTM: When the Pilot Flying (PF) makes an input on the sidestick,...


4

They move, pretty much like an F-16 stick. From this MIT lecture "F-22 Flight Controls", Lt Col Randy Gordon, F-22 test pilot (from the transcript): It's a side stick. Initially it didn't move. Eventually they decided, I'll put in some deflection. So I can go a half inch left, a half inch right, about a quarter inch forward, I go about a half inch ...


4

This will be a theoretical answer, but unless the site is visited by someone from the Airbus control design team, that is probably the best we are going to get. Let me list for you the extremely desirable characteristics of the 'sum' approach. In the normal modes of operation, i.e. when one pilot is 'hands on' and the other 'hands off', the sum function ...


2

From this site: So max deflection in pitch is +/- 16 deg, in roll it is +/- 20 deg


1

It does not truly matter what hand the “stick” is in. It matters how you were trained. It matters to what you have become accustomed. Case in point... In general, the pilot in command of a side-by-side pilot aircraft sits in the left seat. This is the seat in which most people begin their initial pilot training. You will typically control the control yoke ...


1

It's not clear that there is an issue. Is the lack of coupling actually a lack? The lack of coupling between the two side-sticks to provide feedback between the pilots is, intuitively, a lack in the interface. We are used, in the physical world, to being able to feel what another person is doing through the things that we're manipulating, the machinery ...


1

Regarding question 2: There is no tactile or visual feedback (i.e. no sidestick movement when autopilot engaged). There may be visual cues on Airbus aircraft from the Side Stick Priority lights in front of each pilot on the glareshield. There is also an aural warning if sidestick priority is taken. Regarding question 3: The next generation of sidestick ...


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