39

Yes it's called a Deep Stall, and is mostly a problem with T Tail aircraft, especially jets with Supercritical Airfoil wings (like the CRJ Regional Jet line). Such wings stall from the leading edge and the stall's flow separation spreads rapidly and completely across the entire wing all at once, so there is very little residual nose down pitching moment. ...


21

It's hugely unlikely. Almost vanishingly unlikely, with few exceptions perhaps for something a little smaller than a passenger-carrying A380 (like a private jet on a repositioning flight where you know the captain well) You used to be able to go up and see the captain on the flight deck - I did it a few times as a kid. Even then asking to sit in the jump ...


12

As a non-professional pilot, to get a ride in the cockpit jumpseat, you'd have to meet at least three conditions: company policy must allow passenger in jumpseat PIC must allow passenger in jumpseat you'd have to be well known and trusted person to either SIC or PIC (preferrably PIC) If you fail to meet any of those, no jumpseat ride for you. So, very slim ...


12

Airspeed dictates how (and if) a plane flies because it relative to the air that the plane is flying through, the only thing that matters for aerodynamics. Groundspeed can be greater or less than the airspeed depending on which way the air is moving over the ground, i.e. wind. The latter is only important for figuring out when you'll arrive at your ...


6

What you describe is a tailslide, as another answer has noted -- but there is a condition in which the wing is stalled and the normal recovery method (apply down elevator and wait for the nose to drop and airspeed to build) can't be used. It's called a "deep stall" and is only a problem with certain layouts of flying surfaces. One of the best known is a T-...


4

The groundspeed can be more, less or the same as the airspeed. Go back to boats. I'm driving around in my boat on a big river with a 5 mph current. My boat goes 30 mph. If I'm going with the current, my boat is going 35mph relative to the river bottom and the shoreline. If I turn around and go the other way, my boat is going 25mph relative to the river ...


4

In the US, the department of commerce had an Aeronautics Branch. It was first responsible for civil aviation safety. On February 28, 1927 it published a list of the first physicians, who were qualified to give medical examinations for pilot licenses. On December 31, 1926, the Aeronautics Branch issued the first air commerce regulations, that included ...


3

Groundspeed is the MOST important speed to know when it comes to flight planning, and flight monitoring. If you don’t know how much time it will take to arrive at your destination, you may never arrive. There is is only a finite amount of fuel in your tanks. Every flight has to use estimated groundspeed before the flight, and actual groundspeed during the ...


3

I regrettably inform you that your chances are very slim, outside of actually completing the training required to fly the aircraft. In this world where aircraft terrorism is always a concern, you would have to have a very good reason to convince the captain why he has to put a complete stranger in the cockpit. To the captain, the stranger is simply someone ...


3

Yes. Moving CG farther and farther back will eventually cause the plane to be directionally stable falling backwards. Abusing rearward CG limits is contributory to this condition. Secondly, poor design of horizontal stabilizer, particularly, lacking sufficient "weathervaning" area, will cause an aircraft to be more susceptible to the unrecoverable "deep ...


2

I was under the false impression that tail numbers don't change Tail numbers (AKA registrations) are changeable by definition since each country is allocated codes with different prefixes and formats. If an operator from country X buys an aircraft from an operator in country Y, then the tail number must will most of the time be changed to a valid tail ...


2

Aside from ownership changes, tail number change is very rare: The cost to change the tail number with the same national registry, on the aircraft itself and in the maintenance logs plus the cost of the aircraft being out of service for some time will far outweigh any minor cosmetic benefits. The only reason I can think of is changing the registration to a ...


1

If you get on the brakes hard after main touchdown, once the anti-skid is active following wheel spin-up (you can't land with brakes applied on any airliner with anti-skid - brakes are depressurized until after the main wheels start to spin and/or you are weight-on-wheels for a minimum time) and don't apply any additional compensating elevator, the nose will ...


1

The most common time for a tail number to change would be when an aircraft changes ownership. However, if the airplane is staying in the same country, it may not be worth the paperwork to change. Some examples include US Airways aircraft like N167US retaining their registration with American, and AirTran aircraft like N937AT retaining their registration with ...


1

If a conventionally laid out aircraft is flown into a tail slide, it's unlikely that it could maintain that attitude for long. The tail has low mass relative to the rest of the aircraft and a substantial moment between the tail surfaces and aircraft center of mass. As negative airspeed (falling down tail first) builds, aerodynamic forces on the tail will ...


1

This is not really direct answer to the question 'as-is'. It's more answer to 'how can a Non-Pilot' fly regularly in the jumpseat. Just become Flight Dispatcher. In many airlines that gives you 'Known Crew' badge. And with it and PIC permission you can fly in the cockpit as much as you wish. Dispatchers even trump flight attendands in that regard. Regular ...


1

I would suggest to purchase a training session for A320 in a certified flight simulator like this one, for instance. I understand this is not a real flight, but these simulators feature full scale cockpits with all controls, and the realistic algorithms to simulate the flight itself. A after the instructor giving you an introduction, you will be able to ...


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