51

Airliners are both larger and more complex than the small aircraft you're familiar with at your local flight school. For an example of some of the items to consider, see: What do you need to do to bring a 737 Max back in service after 6 months in storage? A lot of those things won't be improved just by flying the plane periodically, but some items are. ...


26

Perhaps this adds little to the answer already posted, but I feel it needs to be emphasized that airliners are designed to fly. Designed to fly a lot, in fact. Like, spend a significant portion of their working lives in the air. Southwest Airlines, for example, has each of its 737s in the sky for 9 hours a day. I imagine Ryanair's number is similar. And ...


11

In addition to all these great breakdowns of the technical aspects of planes airlines will lose their precious airport-slots if they fail to actually use them. I.e. if an airline pays for a (lucrative, useful) time-slot & terminal at a certain airport, but then doesn't actually use it, the airport will give away the slot to someone else. Therefore ...


6

The MD-80 series has two systems that can increase thrust in case an engine fails during takeoff: Automatic Reserve Thrust (ART) This system is independent of the throttle position and can increase the thrust of the remaining engine to the maximum rated thrust in case of an engine failure. It can be turned off with a switch on the glareshield, because it ...


2

The "use it or lose it" rules in Europe are basically trying to compel airlines to keep flying their aircraft. There is a 80/20 rule, which means airlines need to operate 80% of their allocated slots, or a competing airline can take them during the annual assessments by officials. And just like IcarusTyler said, they won't just give away their expensive spot ...


2

As discussed in this question airplanes carry a lot more than just passengers so shutting down passenger flights can stop the flow of essential supplies as well as people. In some cases charter flights are being used during this crisis but the general movement of people (even essential people) often relies on commercial flights. Similarly most states are ...


1

The MiniMap is not an option, it's there as standard. It's fixed at 20-miles range; the optional items are Wxr, Terrain and Traffic. The classic STA, WPT and ARPT from the ND are not available. The MiniMap shows ADF needles, whereas the ND shows VOR needles. The MiniMap looks like a development of the previous compass-rose at the bottom of the PFD, but it'...


1

ADS-B Exchange could be an alternative to FlightRadar24. They have (free if you host a feeder station) APIs so you wouldn't need to go through the headache of scraping. The data should be comparable and with ADS-B becoming mandatory in more and more regions (US since the beginning of the year and an EU mandate covering pretty much all business flights coming ...


1

These are not actually dimples but shallow bulges. I found a higher-res image online and checked it out. The drone is not very large, less than 2 m (6 ft) long. They are not large enough to have significant aerodynamic effect at the speeds the drone flies. Lots of much faster planes have rows of rivet heads which stand out more than these do. They are about ...


1

In addition to these wonderful points about getting a lower price for a mass-order, there are lots of unforeseen upsides to having a fleet of only a SINGLE type of (modern) airplane: New planes live very long New planes are more fuel-efficient than older ones If there is only 1 type of plane it is very straightforward swapping out a plane if one requires ...


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