10

The standard equation applies to any coordinated level turn (so that the G felt is "straight down" to an occupant of the aircraft, in an aircraft frame of reference). Matters not how it's all achieved - flaps, high-lift devices, helo rotor, thrust vectoring, whatever... a coordinated level turn at "this" bank will take "this" ...


8

With thrust vectoring you no longer turn (as in: the wing creates the force that accelerates you in the desired direction) but you do post-stall maneuvering. Next, you need to distinguish between highest instantaneous turn rate (trading altitude for higher rate) and continuous turn rate (which is limited by the available thrust in most cases). Turn rate ...


7

The range of an aircraft depends on the payload. The value you typically find is the range at typical payload. You can find the payload/range diagram in the Boeing 787 Airplane Characteristics for Airport Planning document: As you can see, at maximum zero fuel weight, the 787-10 range is only ~4200 NM. According to Wikipedia, the typical passenger ...


6

Let's imagine 2 theoretical wings, both of which have the same area, but differ in aspect ratio. Then the wing with the higher aspect ratio also has more span. This is what counts. If induced drag depends on the downwash angle, why would a longer wingspan reduce the angle? Because the wider wing will affect more air. Think of the air affected by the wing ...


6

Using AoA as reference gives a simple way to maintain a safe stall margin. If approach speed was used as reference, there would have been multiple speeds to memorize, as the weight is not the same from mission to mission. Remember, wings basically always stall a certain AoA, not certain speed. Specifying a AoA to maintain, the weight of the plane is ...


6

If your optimal lift coefficient for long range cruise flight is greater than what you need, you are flying too fast, or too low. For cruise flight, your lift needs to equal the weight, otherwise the aircraft will accelerate upwards (in the body frame of reference). If you know the lift coefficient that is optimal for cruise, you need to adjust the airspeed ...


6

With thrust/weight ratio above one, you can use the thrust of the engine to accelerate upward (at least at some point in the flight envelope). As long as the engines can deliver full thrust, you can maintain that position. Below one, vertical flight is still possible, but you will be losing speed in the maneuver. Gliders are capable of loops without any ...


5

This related ASE answer may help -- "Does Lift equal Weight in a climb?". Note that a steady-state climb is associated with a smaller lift force than level flight, not a larger lift force. On the other hand, a loop is associated with a larger lift force than level flight. If you increase the lift coefficient, you've increased the lift force -- if ...


4

Correct that changes to one performance parameter will affect others, but it isn't totally clear what you are asking. If you are in the pattern at 11 deg AOA and level flight you are in equilibrium. 11 deg AOA correlates to a certain airspeed at a given weight. That airspeed will vary depending in weight, and the correct indicated airspeed must be for each ...


4

Without knowing more about what you are designing it is impossible to come up with a specific number. But there are a number of factors that you should take into account: the lower the thrust to weight ratio, the longer it will take to accelerate, so the longer the required runway will be. During the take-off roll the lift can usually be neglected, but the ...


3

Yes. Plenty of airplanes with thrust to weight ratios less than 1 can perform vertical maneuvers though time in high pitch or vertical lines is limited as airspeed drops rapidly. Often such airplanes have to be placed in a shallow dive to accelerate them to an appropriate entry airspeed for the maneuver. This is sometimes true for aircraft which have a ...


3

The picture you have displayed is correct. But, your understanding of what it is saying is incorrect. The picture is explaining the reason your Indicated Altitude will change with temperature for the same True Altitude. And, your True Altitude will change with temperature (a potentially dangerous situation) for the same given Indicated Altitude. Your ...


2

Because Pressure altitude is a measure of the weight of the air above you. Temperature does not affect that. Heating the air just makes it expand. It still weighs the same.


2

Power and force are different things. Power is force times velocity. The calculation is done in the reference frame of the air mass. In the reference frame of the aircraft none of the forces are doing work, and the engine power all goes to accelerating the air, but we don't have formulas for that. The lift is, by definition, orthogonal to the flight path, ...


1

I am wondering about the g-load and its relation to the so called gliding ratio. ... So the g load factor is defined as: g=Lift / Weight We'll adopt that definition for the purposes of this answer. Note that that is not the entire apparent g-load felt by the aircraft and pilot. It is just the component that is acting in what we might loosely call the &...


1

Your understanding of induced drag is correct. It is caused by turning the air flow and the force that does it must be tilted, otherwise conservation of energy would be violated. The stream ‘tube’ affected by the wing is obviously as wide as the wing, and always considered to be roughly as high as wide. That is, wings with higher span affect air to greater ...


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