6

Here's the difference in a nutshell: When you change the number in Kollsman window to bigger number and the atmosphere stays the same, the reading on your altimeter increases. When you leave the number in the Kollsman window the same (let's say you have it set to 29.92 to see the pressure altitude) and the atmospheric conditions change so that the correct ...


5

A copy of the flight manual was released under a FOIA request and can be found here. It actually does not say a whole lot about stalls but it does reference some minimum speeds in the emergency engine out procedure section under "COMPLETE POWER FAILURE IMMEDIATELY AFTER TAKEOFF" Maintain a safe flying speed and control until contact is made NOTE: ...


4

This is the nearest you will get to aerobatics. You can check out their website for more information. Company History After 11 years of surmounting meticulous procedures and safety regulations, co-founders Dr. Peter H. Diamandis, veteran astronaut Dr. Byron K. Lichtenberg and NASA engineer Ray Cronise acquired FAA approval for G-FORCE ONE, a specially ...


4

First, we must be clear on what exactly is "excess thrust". I will list two possible definitions, although many more may be possible. Excess thrust is the component of the resultant force in the direction of the flight path. Using this definition, excess thrust and steady state flight are directly at odds (because any net force results in an ...


3

Circulation may be controlled via either air blown through spanwise slots or horizontal-axis rotors, alone or in combination. Experiments on wing systems go back at least as far as 1902 and since then almost every variation imaginable has been tried. The problems come in the engineering implementation. Where investigations have reached the stage of flight ...


3

A. It simply means that the airplane will perform according to the combination of pitch and power control inputs that you make. B. Yes, why wouldn’t it be? Aircraft are subject to basic laws of physics. These laws are consistent. Every time you pitch nose down and add power you will descend and accelerate. Every time. C. N/A because it is always true, ...


3

All you need to do is to plot vertical versus horizontal speed using the same scale on both axes. Then the solution is the point with the steepest angle from the origin of the graph. Of course, it helps to do this in metric units. And to add a description to the axes of a plot. The solution can then be directly read from the graph.


3

Induced drag $D_i$ is proportional to the square of lift $L$: $$D_i = \frac{2\cdot L^2}{\rho\cdot v^2\cdot\pi\cdot b^2\cdot\epsilon}$$ where $b$ is wingspan, $v$ is flight speed and $\rho$ is air density. $\epsilon$ is an efficiency factor which tends to be between 0.8 and 1. Compared to straight and level flight, induced drag will quadruple when turning at ...


2

Aircraft power curve (a.k.a “polar”—a completely illogical name because somebody long ago plotted them in polar coordinates, which makes no sense, but the name stuck) This is just the power balance of the aircraft: the power provided by the propulsion system minus the power taken away by drag. You can divide the values by velocity (true airspeed) to get a ...


2

I thought we could just check the thrust and weight, but it's not that easy. The static thrust of one engine looks like it is enough for both aircraft: B744 has MTOW 4050 kN, estimating L/D to 18 it needs 225 kN to maintain altitude and the static thrust is 276–282 kN (depending on engine option). A388 has MTOW 5640 kN, using the same L/D it needs 313 kN to ...


1

The point of thrust vector control is post-stall maneuvering. Control surfaces lose much of their effectiveness when the flow over them is separated. Pointing the jet exhaust in different directions works almost regardless of angle of attack. All that is required is good intake flow, and by placing the intake below the forebody (as done on the X-31, the F-16 ...


1

Commercial aircraft are designed to be as lightweight and hence cheap to operate as possible. The aerodynamic and inertial loads of aerobatic manoeuvres demand stronger, heavier, less economic construction. Even military types such as bombers often baulk at outright aerobatics; a bit of ducking and diving is about it, and even then that can shorten the ...


1

No it cannot climb with only one engine. If it can climb with one engine the plane would be a twin jet not a quad jet. The number of engines is determine by power require for normal operation plus a margin in case one engine malfunctions during climb out. An engine is a very expensive piece of equipment both in term of up front cost and maintenance so two ...


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