60

You can find the full incident report here and this topic is touched upon briefly, but in short they had little to no time to entertain any other options but a full speed landing. It was not until the aircraft [was] on the final descent for landing that the Commander realised they could not reduce the thrust on the number 1 engine. The speed was not ...


58

Engine #2 wasn't doing its job either Had the situation just been engine #1 stuck at high thrust, with engine 2 normally controllable, than what you describe would be a reasonable response to the situation. However, that was not the case with CX780 -- during approach, Engine #2 was stuck at 17% N1 (or rather below idle) and thus delivering effectively nil ...


42

To supplement Jimmy's answer, if they had to land right away, they could have; it just would've resulted in an overweight landing being recorded, and which on most airliners triggers a special inspection of the landing gear and its attaching structure, and if nothing is permanently bent or cracked or broken, you are good to go. An overweight landing in ...


32

Stalls occur based on a wing's angle of attack rather than the aircraft's airspeed. (In fact, one of the basic facts that all pilots learn in their initial training is that an airplane can stall at any airspeed). The A330 measures angle of attack using vanes mounted on the fuselage: However, below 60 knots, these vanes become ineffective. During the ...


31

It is the avionic compartment access door as described in the Flight Crew Operating Manual! An inward-opening, manually operated, hinged door gives access to the avionics compartment. This door is in the lower fuselage, forward of the nose landing gear bay. A ladder is stowed inside the compartment adjacent to this door, which may be either be operated ...


24

First of all, keep in mind that the Philippines has one of the shortest average populations on Earth. Their average passenger weighs a lot less than an average American or European, since weight scales roughly with the cube of height. So, 436 Filipinos don't weigh nearly as much as 436, say, Americans or Europeans, assuming average populations from each ...


24

I think the characterization that it's "too heavy to land safely" is erroneous; the fuel burning is probably out of circumspection and to allow for a better safety margin. The runway length may also be beyond the landing field length and/or the brake energy limit of the heavy weight, so decreasing weight would add to the safety if immediate return to land is ...


23

The short answer is that it's what the market wanted. There is always a lot of discussions between the airlines and manufacturer's before Airbus or Boeing commits to building a new aircraft. In this case both Boeing and Airbus came to the same decision -- the airlines were being driven by one single factor to replace their A320 or B737 fleets, they just ...


23

If fuel contamination is suspected (because of engine control system fault indications, slow engine responses or rapid engine pressure ratio (EPR) fluctuations), there is an associated checklist procedure to followed which can confirm the contamination: Fuel contamination checklist as posted by "330 skipper" at Nov 24th 2017 13:47Z on Avherald: If ENG ...


22

From the incident report section 1.1.4: a. At 0519 hrs during the descent to a cleared level of FL230, ECAM messages “ENG 1 CTL SYS FAULT” and “ENG 2 STALL” were annunciated within a short period of time. According to the Commander, a light “pop” sound was heard and some “ozone” and “burning” smell was detected shortly before the ECAM message “ENG ...


19

Short answer: To create a funnel for all the air streaming towards the fuselage. Slightly longer answer: Air approaching a swept wing will be accelerated towards the area with the lowest pressure and, therefore, will be sucked towards the wing's center. The center itself will show a markedly different pressure distribution over chord than the two-dimensional ...


15

It is a seal- to prevent entry of air into the stabilizer mounting area. For aircraft with trimmable horizontal stabilizers (THS), there is an opening to the rear of the aft bulkhead to allow for the movement of the THS. It can be seen in the following image for Boeing 787. Boeing 787 aft fuselage structure; image from aero-news.net Now, as the opening ...


15

To add to Gerry's answer (and this will be slightly too long for a comment), there is a huge disadvantage to drastically changing the cockpit when going from an A320 to the A320 NEO or from a B737-300 to the B737-700, or 737 NG to 737 Max, and that has to do with the existing fleets. If you keep the cockpit basically the same and just add what new switches ...


14

Complexity and weight, what airlines hate most. Has it been done before? Yup. A variant of the Convair B-36 Peacemaker was able to stop the windmilling when the jet engines were not needed (that variant had 6 piston engines and 4 jet engines). (Source) The metal petals filling the inlet prevented the jets from turning in the wind as the B-36 cruised for ...


13

It is the port for mid-air fuel jettison. (Image credit: http://opilotoprofissional.blogspot.hk/2011/08/consideracoes-sobre-overweight-landing.html) The A330 is a long range airliner, capable of serving flight routes that are 10~12 hours long. It is equipped to dump fuel while in-flight to reduce its landing weight. The A320 is not a long range airliner, ...


13

That 'hole' gives access to the avionics comparment- forward zone. The comparment has a ground access ladder, which is seen in the image. The deployment of that ladder (which is similar in A330/A340) can be seen in this video.


13

If the system detects anomalies for more than about ten seconds, alternate law becomes locked in for the remainder of the flight. The system detected a change in the median value of the three airspeed sources of more than 30 knots within one second (it actually dropped from 274 to 52 knots within 3 seconds). That started a process where the system monitors ...


13

The table in the report omits a condition. Here is the ECAM message in full: The limitation applies when the aircraft is in emergency electrical configuration (run by the ram air turbine), which is one way to have the flight laws degraded. The manual does not give a direct reason (not unheard of), but in fact there's more than one reason. ► As a quick ...


12

What other circumstances may cause the autopilot to trip out? There are numerous circumstances, a few at random pilot presses the autopilot disconnect pushbutton. applying force to control-stick that contradicts autopilot. entering a stall. activation of high AoA protection. descending below MDA on a non-ILS approach. inconsistent data. will it not ...


11

Those two locations you circled out are the under-wing refuelling pods, mounted on pylons (where, I suspect, the A340 outboard engines would be). You can find a picture of them on the A330 MRTT Wikipedia entry, under the Design section. And those propellers on the pods are likely the ram air turbines that power the refuelling pods, according to the ...


11

Aside from what Unrec. and GdD point out, even if the other engine had been running perfectly... A frequent problem with twin engine airplanes is shutting down the wrong engine. Nobody ever expects or plans to shut down the wrong engine, but it happens anyway. So a crew is very cautious to shutdown an engine that is working.


10

The number of flight attendants required on flights are mandated by international safety regulations. For planes with up to 19 passenger seats, no flight attendant is needed. For larger planes, one flight attendant per 50 passenger seats is needed.—Wikipedia Eight cabin crew is enough. 377/50 is 7.54.


10

I have recently flown on a China Eastern A330-200 from Shanghai to Beijing and that noise was heard around 10.000 feet both on the way up and on the way down. It sounds awful! Everybody was rather worried, including myself who, despite being a frequent flyer, had never heard that noise. At first I thought it was some fatigue issue of the aircraft skin while "...


9

You're correct- for cargo aircraft derived from passenger planes, the cabin is pressurized. This reduces the complexity and certification requirements. Also, this allows for easy conversion too. The thick door may be due to two reasons: To improve load carrying/transferring capacity- airbus talks about ... the aircraft’s reinforced fuselage and doors, ...


9

Actually the A330neo is already eating up into the A350-800 orders so much that they have abandoned it. “Their A350 strategy has failed -- they’re really down to one successful model,” Boeing Marketing Vice President Randy Tinseth told reporters at the Farnborough expo near London. “If they didn’t make this choice, they’d be headed for a 30 to 35 percent ...


8

For one reason or another, the main gear was made longer that originally planned and it was decided to avoid the cost and weight also extending the nose gear to match. The nose down angle while rolling along the ground is no big deal one way or the other, except for looking bad and disconcerting passengers who wonder why the plane is tilted forward. Lots ...


7

The [relevant] dimensions of the cargo compartments are published by the manufacturers. For all Airbus planes, visit: Airbus / Airport and Maintenance Planning. You can also search for other manufacturers. For the requested number of containers, here they are for the A330-300/900 (no need for the volume as the containers are standardized): The documents ...


7

Based on general engineering principles, there are multiple reasons why such a locking device could be unhelpful at best, and dangerous at worst: It would be one more system that adds weight and complexity. It would take up additional room that isn't available, and making that room would affect the aerodynamics and the weight. It would be one more system to ...


7

Mainly because of customer concerns. Airbus, or any other aircraft manufacturer can propose a bunch of variants in its catalog, but it's the airlines that defines what aircraft are to be developed next. (On a timeline of 10 years up to 30 years - I don't recall the link, but that's Lufthansa Group's explanation.) Since the decline of the A340s and 747s, ...


7

A330-900neo A350-900 Seating 287–440 325 / 173 (ULR) MTOW 251 t 280 t OEW 137 t 137 t Unit cost US$296.4 M US$317.4 M Thrust/eng 324 kN 375 kN The A330 having fewer seats means a bigger chance of high utilization on any given flight (or having high-density small seats for shorter ...


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