Hot answers tagged

33

The runway ahead of you is useful to accelerate and - if needed - to decelerate. If you enter (or touch down) the runway in the middle, you will not be able to benefit from the part of the runway behind your entering point. It is the same as if that part would not exist. Therefore it is useless.


13

You asked about commercial aircraft in general, so I will give an answer from that point of view. Is there any obvious warning when auto-pilot is disengaged? Yes, both visually as flashing lights, and aurally. Furthermore, the lights and tone does not go away until a second confirmation is received from the pilot. For example, pushing the button on the ...


13

The Boeing 737 allows a mode called control wheel steering (CWS). The A320 doesn't. For what is CWS, see: Is it possible to disengage only one axis of a two-axis autopilot? The wording on Wikipedia doesn't emphasize this point; however, the final report does. The pilots may also manually control the aircraft in a normal manner with the control wheel and ...


10

It refers to takeoff from an intersection rather than using the full runway length. The part of the runway behind you is now useless. It is part of the saying because the TODA (takeoff distance available) is now reduced and this needs to be taken into account when doing performance calculations. It is e.g. discussed in this thread on pprune.org. One could ...


7

It comes from previous accidents and improvements in auto-deploying/inflating slides. One airline wanted the FAA to impose a 90-second limit in the 60s, but the FAA opted for a two-minute limit based on previous accidents. But in 1966 the limit was changed to 90 seconds with improvements in auto-deploying slides. Two-minute limit One air carrier ...


5

The most obvious reason is that the ITU allocated the VHF and UHF bands for aviation purposes generally, and then aviation authorities had to split those limited bands into adjacent comm and nav sub-bands. If aviation had gotten separate ranges for nav and comm, then that would double the risk of interference from adjacent non-aviation users, plus it would ...


4

It's called "partial panel" flying and if you ever advance to a commercial license, you will have to demonstrate proficiency at partial panel during training and on the commercial check ride. On my commercial check flight in the late 70s I even had to demonstrate recovery from an unusual attitude (diving spiral) on partial panel under the hood because my ...


4

The most common killer of inadequately trained pilots who fly into clouds is a spiral dive, caused by the aircraft entering a steep bank without the pilot realizing it or understanding the direction of turn. Eventually the aircraft is destroyed due overspeed or excess G-load. A magnetic compass is generally useless whenever an aircraft is banked and ...


4

Is it true that a Turn and slip indicator is a valid back-up for the attitude indicator? Partially, but it would need to be used in conjunction with one or more other instruments if the Artificial Horizon is inoperable. Change in the DI and/or compass will indicate a turn. Change in altitude on an altimeter will indicate a climb or descent. Usefulness of ...


2

A direct flight from Toronto to Manila is about 16 hours. It is classified as a "Polar" flight and very little of it would be over the open ocean. Depending on the weather and upper wind conditions, you would be initially flying either North East, or North West, from Toronto. Most of the flight will be over land, with some of it over the frozen Arctic ...


1

The part of the runway behind you, during takeoff, cannot be used for acceleration, or during landing, for deceleration.


1

No, there are no civil aviation authorities that require QMS implementation. ICAO documentation (Document 9859) discusses the integration of other systems, such as quality and environmental management systems. There are advantages of integrations, such as facilitating data management and reducing redundancies. For example, a QMS has many of the same ...


1

The highest peak in Saudi Arabia is Jabal Ferwa at 9,856 feet above sea level. Add some padding for safe terrain clearance, instrument error and human error, and 15,000 feet looks like a reasonable transition altitude. The highest peak in the contiguous United States is Mt. Whitney at 14,505 feet, so 18,000 feet for the transition altitude looks similarly ...


1

If you're talking about flex thrust, then NO - it is not at all a problem. It is basically a FAKE temperature which the pilots provide the FADEC with so that the FADEC purposely reduces the amount of thrust generated by the engine. This can improve engine lift by reducing wear. But remember, PILOT'S ARE NOT SUPPOSED TO USE FLEX THRUST DURING ROUGH WEATHER. ...


1

No it's not dangerous. Flex thrust simply exploits all of the runway available, taking advantage of any length that is surplus to the minimum required at max thrust, to allow takeoff with less than maximum thrust to save wear and tear and fuel (wear and tear is a big deal taking off in a sandy/dusty environment and use of flex has a significant effect on ...


1

Early research on post-crash fires focused on their causes and development, but soon it became obvious that the best way of reducing fatalities from post-crash fires lay in speedy evacuation of crew and passengers. Quoted from DOT/FAA/AR-95/84: In April of 1964, the FAA crash-tested a Douglas DC7 transport aircraft to examine the postcrash causes of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible