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21

According to this blog: Up until 1977, the FAA required all jets to be operated by two pilots. In ‘77, Cessna was given approval on a single-pilot variant of the Citation I, the Citation I-SP. The aircraft met the 12,500-pound maximum takeoff weight threshold for small aircraft, but that wasn’t the only single-pilot qualification. Cessna also had to ...


5

It would make sense if you've ever been involved in a development program. It's important to understand the trade-offs Boeing was faced with. It was either the band-aid, MCAS, or kibosh the program. The "proper" solution to the problem was doing something physical to aircraft; limiting aft C of G, enlarging the tail, stretching the fuselage, or ...


4

The video starts with Mt Everest straight ahead while in a left turn. And based on the video description, the flight took off from Kathmandu. The Nepalese AIP depicts this Mountain Flight Route, shown in red below, and the turn we see is the video would be the turn going back to Kathmandu. — https://e-aip.caanepal.gov.np Note that the Tibetan Plateau is ...


4

Admittedly, the 10 degree sloped roadway is an anomaly, and you would never see an actual runway built on this grade. Don’t try to apply any of this logic to a shallower runway without some careful analysis. Here's my take on the possible landing approaches. I think my performance estimates are generally conservative. I think the flight maneuvers are ...


3

Unless the wind is too strong you should try to land uphill. Tailwind will increase the required length of the runway. When you land uphill you have a significantly larger angle between your glide path and the hill slope compared to landing on a horizontal runway. That means the required length of the runway decreases. Both effects work against each other ...


3

To clarify some misconceptions about Linux which run across many of the answers given. Linux is NOT a "commercial" OS. It is free for anybody to download and hack about as they please. (Some companies package it up with a load of apps as a distribution or "distro" and do charge for supporting the package). Linux is NOT a monolithic build ...


2

Theoretically, if the Neutral Point was still aft of the C of G with the tail gone, you could still be statically stable to some degree, but without the trimming surfaces of the elevator/stab providing the pitching force-balance system to control AOA, you become statically stable about the wing's zero-pitching-moment AOA somewhere, and you are more or less a ...


2

No - though the vertical stabilizer might be worked around, the same is not true for the horizonal stablizer. Without it you will loose stability in the pitch axis so much that I doubt there will be any chance for a controlled flight on nearly all aircaft (though there is a possibility that a few ones might remain some kind of controllability)


2

It really depends on the aircraft. A DC-8 is known to have done this. (https://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/i-was-there-when-the-dc-8-went-supersonic-27846699/) There are 2 sources of stress on the airframe in this situation- airliners aren't designed to fly past Mach 1 (except the Concorde and Tu-144...), so there's one issue. There's also the ...


2

In the US, the ARTCC where the incident occurs acts as the focal point for search and rescue operations. They work directly with the US Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, local, state, and Federal law enforcement (if necessary), and the Civil Air Patrol during search operations.


2

Ok, for the F-16 to fire the gun on the ground you need, Ammo, electrical and hydraulic power, hold back tool removed, electrical safety pin removed, rounds limiter set to off or at least 100. No avionics need be powered. Master arm to arm, ground Jett to enable. Squeeze the trigger. The gun will fire until the last round switch opens because it’s out of ...


2

none of the arguments exchanged in here is completely wrong, but i would wish some participants would apply a little more effort in balancing their arguments. The real buzz-words for aviation are real time and safety. Of cause, in aviation safety comes first and if you need something to happen, most of the time it has to happen immediately and something has ...


2

Landing downhill/into the wind may result in more wear on the brakes if done often, but would be much safer as an emergency procedure, especially in unfamiliar terrain. A 10 degree downslope on a road would be a 17% down grade, a very rare road indeed. The glide slope of a 172 is around 1:8 which works out to a 7 degree downslope (using sin and arcsin ...


1

If there was no wind, I'd probably land uphill, but in the circumstance you describe I'll take the into-wind direction landing down the hill. This gives the lowest ground speed and therefore the lowest energy state if things don't go so well (you have a 30 knot energy difference between the two landing directions - that's a lot, and a bigger deal all around ...


1

How does one launch unmanned high-altitude balloons without posing a safety risk to aviation? By using some common sense, and not relying entirely on the regulations to ensure safety. In the US, FAR 101 governs free balloon operations. Note the requirement to notify ATC before launching. One odd "loophole"-- it's arguably permissible to operate ...


1

Also relevant: there are other considerations. Its generally acceptable to launch small experimental payloads (ie simple telemetry + call sign transmitter on a permitted ISM band) as long as the total uninflated weight is below the limit for a Class 1 drone ie <250g. The radar reflector must be a specified size and shape, connected to the balloon via ...


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