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37

(disclaimer - Former USAF armament specialist) The intention was not necessarily to "ram", but rather get eyeballs on the situation and take whatever action was needed. That may have, eventually, been a "ramming". Obviously, that was not their first choice of action. And ramming a 757 was not a thing that was practiced or planned for. As ...


17

Searching through the Aviation Herald database for incidences with the word tree, I found 3 cases: An Eagle Air Let L410 contacted a tree during departure from Lankien in South Sudan. The right wing tip was damaged, but the aircraft continued to its destination, where the wing tip was repaired: A China Eastern Airbus A320 contacted trees during a go-around ...


11

Because an inch or two of rubber isn’t going to stop a 300lb cart from breaking your foot if it goes out of control down an aisle. If your elbow is in the wrong position, you could hit it with a 300lb roll of memory foam and cause a compound fracture. The maker of this video is just looking for things to complain about. Keep your body parts out of the aisle ...


8

Yes, for example an MD-83 operating as American Airlines flight 1572 impacted trees on a ridgeline (and an ILS antenna!) on approach to Bradley Internal Airport in Connecticut in 1995. It ultimately landed short with no fatalities and one "minor" injury. The NTSB report AAR96-05 is currently here, but probably subject to link rot (so I'll post the ...


7

When I was flight crew on CRJs for a private operator we got abbreviated FA training for pilots, which was mostly a kind of crowd control course, taught by a contract FA. Their training is about managing a chaotic cabin full or panicking passengers. FA's are more or less under-cover riot control cops who spend their careers working as servers/attendants and ...


6

Gallium does not interact strongly with steel so it is unlikely to damage hydraulic pipes (these are made from steel, not aluminium). Same source says it also does not interact much with polymers so unlikely to damage the insulated wiring or rubber hoses or epoxy floor panels. It may damage some sensitive point where important device is attached to the ...


4

if that was a real event, shouldn't Captain Townsend (as the instructor) interrupt the relaxing gliding with a warning? Something along the lines of "excuse me, sir, we're losing altitude, if you want me to restart the engine we have to do it now", or even "I'm restarting the engine now". I mean, shouldn't he be checking the limit ...


3

Most pilots are not currently qualified to serve as flight attendants, but they could be trained easily enough following an abbreviated syllabus. Since pilots are already familiar with all the aircraft emergency equipment and procedures, training would just need to focus on specific tasks in different areas of the cabin. That, plus operation of beverage and ...


3

In all big air craft, the retraction cycle involves the opening and extension of many bay doors where the gear is stored. Practically it means that initially you will experience an increase in drag when the gear is retracted. We do not want this when close to ground.


2

That scene is completely unrealistic as you have guessed. When the engine of a single engine airplane fails there's always a chance you may not be able to restart it, so the procedure is to slow to best glide speed, choose a field to land in, and start flying an approach. Next you work through your engine failure restart procedure, and if you can't get it ...


1

At least some of the remarks here show a very poor understanding of what cabin crew are and what they do. No, pilots cannot replace cabin crew without substantial formal training. Cabin crew are highly trained professionals, just like pilots. It's true that unlike pilots they are not in command of the machinery, and that their role requires them to do many ...


1

Is there such thing as "standard visual inspection" at all? Is it normal in such circumstances? What's its purpose and how necessary is it? Visual inspections are very common. Military pilots train regularly to visual inspections of other aircraft, and typically close to within 25-50 feet of another (cooperative) aircraft to do so. At a 25-50 foot ...


1

The bail-out procedure is usually only available on the first and second prototypes, which are the riskiest because they are usually designated for testing aerodynamics, dynamics, performance and flight controls, as well as for envelope expansion. Obviously, it's only used as a last resort when recovery is deemed impossible. In an efficient and professional ...


1

Yes, you can safely plug in a 6A load. Possibly a circuit breaker will pop out after some time. That depends on the rating of the circuit breaker serving the outlet and if there are any other loads on that circuit breaker. But it is completely safe to try it.


1

It could work both ways. Having a steward that is qualified to fly or "sit in" as a flight engineer in high workload situations (take off/landing/illness to pilot or copilot/inclement weather/aircraft malfuction) would be an asset, especially on a smaller carrier. Pilots could also add diversity to their job by rotating to serve passengers, if ...


1

I found a blog post that answers the question by using commercial aviation as a metric. General aviation (US) 1 death in 64,000 hours 156x as dangerous as commercial aviation Flying sailplanes (Germany, France) 1 death in 50,000 hours 200x as dangerous as commercial aviation The following graph shows the relative difference between sailplanes and powered ...


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