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It should come as no surprise that flying an airplane is not like driving a car. When driving a car, you can come to a complete stop and nothing exciting will happen. You cannot do this in an airplane; coming to a complete stop is either the beginning or the end of a great deal of excitement. Flying near the ground in any circumstance is a hazard. As you say,...


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It is active whenever the flaps are being moved by the hydraulic system on the 737; it isn't available when using the backup (electrical) system. Allowing asymmetric flap extension before takeoff could have consequences as serious as asymmetric extension in flight. Plus, tying the protection to an air/ground sensor is one more way that the system might fail. ...


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The primary reasons large airliner-sized aircraft would stay in formation is for a photo flight, or for reasons related to military operations. Very few civilian airliner-sized aircraft are grey. The two grey aircraft are surely military tankers, both of the same type. The white aircraft is in position to receive fuel from the front aircraft. Based on ...


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The first two aircraft seem really close in lateral distance, but at much different altitudes. If they are separated by 4000-6000 feet of altitude (which could be the case), they are about a mile apart. That is a safe and respectable distance. The third aircraft is about 30° (rough estimate) of displacement from the first two. Depending on the distance ...


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Yes they are. FAR 25.427 has the requirements for lateral gust loads. I don't know if there was FDR information for the BOAC flight, but it may very well have been a similar event to AA Flight 587, the one that lost its vertical fin over NYC when the pilot got on the pedals in reaction to a wake turbulence encounter that induced a large yaw, and made rudder ...


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Aviation is an exercise in mitigating risks. There's usually more than one hazard at any given time. So, yes, running your engine at full power might increase risk of engine failure versus a lower power setting. However, taking off at lower power settings increases risks in other areas. For instance ... ... you have to reach rotation speed before you go ...


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Because Runways Are Short (relatively speaking) The simple answer comes down to the fact that you only have so much space to take off so getting off the ground as fast as possible is the most practical and most safe option. Aircraft will fly when the wings generate sufficient lift to overcome the weight of the aircraft, this happens when there is enough ...


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I was looking this up, because I am taking IATA DGR training. Per IATA carbonated beverages are not subject to dgr regulations as they are foodstuff IATA ref 3.2.2.4.2 (very slow pdf download) 3.2.2.4 Exemptions 3.2.2.4.1 Gases of Division 2.2, are not subject to these Regulations if they are transported at a pressure less than 200 kPa at 20°C and are not ...


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