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20

There should be no problem in general with flying with a passenger in a front row seat in a GA flight, as long as the aircraft is certified for single-pilot operations. You'd want to check your national regulations to be certain, but I have a hard time imagining that it would be prohibited as long as you're allowed to carry passengers in the first place. In ...


5

It sounds like just another theoretical scenario. If that "hacker" wanted to do harm, he could also loosen a few bolts, disrupt the engine timing, plant a bomb, you name it. Sure, in today's world of aircraft loaded with electronic systems the operators have little knowledge of and trust implicitly, it's quite possible that something that deliberately feeds ...


4

Yes, friends & family can sit up front with you in a light aircraft. It is your responsibility as PIC to brief the passenger regarding the controls - which anyone not used to a light aircraft may not be familiar with - the last thing you want is them pushing the yoke forward at the wrong time.


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Just last year the crash of an Air Niugini flight was directly related to pilots ignoring warnings The captain and first officer ignored a total of 17 audible warnings that they were flying too low. “The crew seemed to have disregarded and talked over all the caution annunciations. The crew had experienced those type of cautions on previous ...


3

A Valan Air Cargo An-26 crashed in Cote de Ivoire on the 14th of October, 2017, while performing a charter flight. The aircraft descended below minimums on approach and impacted terrain, in this case a water body, short of the runway. Among the contributing factors, the BEA listed "De-activation of EGPWS audible warnings due to nuisance alerts". The ...


3

A notable accident was the Helios Airways Flight 522 crash, where the pressurization system was turned off and the pilots ignored the warning horn because they thought it was the takeoff config warning. From the Wikipedia page: As the aircraft climbed, the pressure inside the cabin gradually decreased. As it passed through an altitude of 12,040 feet (3,...


3

The first answer deals with avionics (displays, autopilot, annunciations, stall warning), whose single source failure is usually of minor criticality. If your stall warning misfires, it's not a big deal since the pilot is expected to cross-check against the other sources (co-pilot screen, ISI, etc.), and finally cut off the stick shaker (stick pusher, on the ...


3

Beta props are pretty rare on anything smaller than Twin Otter or King Air or Porter or Turbo Beaver. Can't speak for MT's system, but most beta mode systems use mechanisms to switch control of propeller blade angle from the propeller rpm governor to the throttle. Beta mode is the mode of throttle or power lever control of blade angle, with engine torque ...


2

Yes, it is safe. Prior to every flight, ground technicians and one of the pilots will complete a pre-flight walk around of the aircraft, which includes checking the engines thoroughly. Any issues with the turbine blades would be noticed at this point and the flight would not depart.


2

In general, no. Only in cases where system failure has very little impact on continued safe operation of the aircraft. As mentioned in this question, an analysis needs to be made on: Severity of the consequences of system failure. Exposure time to the failure condition. The failure rate of the hardware. The consequences of a cruise autopilot failing are ...


2

CNN's take on the DHS announcement: https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/30/politics/airplane-hacking-risk/index.html Washington (CNN) Physical hacking of airplane electrical systems is a realistic possibility that could bring down aircraft, the Department of Homeland Security warned Tuesday. The government said researchers at a cybersecurity firm ...


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On May 9th, 2012, a Sukhoi Sukhoi Superjet 100-95 on a demonstration flight in Indonesia crashed into a mountain while in clouds. The Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) gave warnings, and the crew could have still avoided the terrain up to 24 seconds after the first warning, but they ignored and then inhibited the warnings, commenting that it must ...


1

Probably safer in the belly than anywhere else due to stress, bending, and weight balance issues. The wings would be closest to pitch CG, but loading them with fuel would affect the roll rate as well as a possibility of creating a sickening uneven "sloshing" motion that could affect passenger comfort. The solution is called "inerting" or eliminating one ...


1

Yes the fuel from the centre tank can be moved to another place in the aircraft. It's a lot of fuel though. Some ideas I thought of: Store fuel in anti-shock bodies on the wings (or they could be just small sears-haack bodies on the wings). Technically possible, but there will be a large amount of pods. Store fuel in the empannage. This is already done ...


1

I think one more reason is the pitch of the aircraft during climb and descent phases, and the take off acceleration. During take-off and early climb, as acceleration (almost 0.3g for an A320) slams the passenger into the seat back, it would be very uncomfortable to seat backward with only a belt retaining the pax (a 80kg passenger will be subjected to a ...


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