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Airplanes fly mainly because their wings push air downwards. As the air is being pushed down, an upwards force pushes the wing up. The downwards movement of the air is achieved by two methods, both of which are used on airplanes: The leading edge of the wing is higher than the trailing edge, making the wing act as a wedge. The angle between the line from ...


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One engine has a diameter of 2.96 m, the area is 6.88 m2. Airplane speed of 486 kts is 250 m/s. The density at FL280 is 0.493070 kg/m3. @ Q1) In case there are 2 engines (not specified), having each an intake flow of (assuming that the column of air is sucked into the engine without inlet spillage (drag)): $$ \dot m = {\rho\times \dot V = \rho\times A\times ...


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As Jpe61 wrote, the important thing is that the air gets pushed downwards. Contrary to what's often said, it doesn't really have anything to do with the Bernoulli effect. Flow on the underside of the wing is quite easy to understand: air collides with the surface, which it can't penetrate, so it is forced to change its path from moving horizontally, to ...


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Aha! finally found the answer. Based on this and this F-15 uses an APU named Jet Fuel Starter (JFS) which is fitted centrally between the two engines. See 15 on the figure below Another figure of the intake and exhaust of the JFS from bottom of the fighter: The below figure shows the danger area of the JFS: And finally here is an image of this JFS: Hope ...


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Your question: Here is a section view of a sample and I indicated the connection area. What type of connection elements are used there? Anything related will be helpful. From the title of your question I guess you assume the bolted element is a HPC rotor, and you might be wondering why a rotor would be bolted to a stationary element, the fan frame. Indeed ...


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The reason you can't find them is that they don't exist. All US military references used the commercial designations for these engines. Why? Because (except for the YC-15) the airframes were purchased as Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) and then modified for their mission. Since the engines were already integrated into the aircraft and had an existing ...


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In short, airplanes fly because the shape of their wings and the attitude they move through the air at generate lift. While there still remains some debate as to exactly how wings do this, science has resolved the reason to a basic principle cause resulting from two different phenomena. Wings generate lift by altering the momentum of air passing around them. ...


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In effect, this question is related to In a turbofan what holds the spinning axis?. This question has an excellent answer that closely relates to this question (but isn't a duplicate). The following figure is re-posted for a relevant answer. Credits go to user mins. HP rotors of CFM56-7B. Adapted from CFM56-7B Familiarization Manual This answer hints to ...


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