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It appears to be a Rolls Royce Viper turbo jet engine made in 1966. The maker's mark (BSB) derives from Bristol Siddeley, formed from Armstrong Siddeley (the company that originally developed the engine) and Bristol Aero-engines. Bristol Siddeley were later taken over by Rolls Royce. Source: Wikipedia


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This has actually been done, at least on the CFM-56 series at some point. The image is taken from here, the article is about the F108 engine which is the US military version of the CFM-56. In newer versions of the engine the blade-tip shrouds have been replaced by mid-span shrouds as below (from Wikipedia), or have been removed. As pointed out by Camille ...


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What forces air to move from lower to higher pressure? In the compressor, the pressure continuously increases from first stage to last stage, that's the purpose of the whole thing. But your question is valid: Why would air move from the first stage to the second stage where the pressure is higher? The reason is indeed the rotating blades of a stage push air ...


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The engines were mounted well inboard to reduce the hazard of asymmetric thrust. Four turbines are placed so close to centerline of plane that even if two on one side cut out, pilot has little trouble maintaining straight, level flight. [photo caption, p. 101] ... The Comet's engines are snugged in so closely to the fuselage that there's no need for the ...


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Land-based turbines sometimes use rotating shrouds, with something like a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labyrinth_seal to reduce leakage. So it's structurally sound in principle. But turbines in airplanes have to tolerate nonaxial loads, foreign object ingestion, and a broad range of ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity. Affixing the blade tips to ...


2

To add to the fine answers: The rotating shroud woud add extra mass, as the duct would still have to run past it. This mass would also be rotating at high speed, creating substantial gyroscopic forces, and on top of all that, making the engine less responsive. Then there are the constructional issues: although not at all impossible to engineer, as there are ...


1

This depends greatly on the engine. However, given the 737 MAX situation, I'll assume you mean re-engining with larger, more efficient engines. This still leaves a lot of room for interpretation- what aircraft are we working with? Something like the 757, with tons of ground clearance? Or something like the 737, with very little clearance? I'll answer both. ...


1

We take axial flow turbines as our example here. Tangental flow of air (flow that circulates around the engine's central axis) is imparted to the air by viscous drag between the air and the rotating fan and compressor blades. Between those fan discs are stator blades that act to straighten out the tangental flow and help convert the kinetic energy of the ...


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It depends on a lot of factors. Most valves with the specs you need will work really, but you'll have to carefully determine your specs. There's not really a single answer. What kind of thrust are you designing your engine for? This (amongst other things) will determine your minimum needed flow rate, and will determine the pressures this valve will need to ...


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Based on the GE website, where they used a GE90-115B as a power generation unit, called the LM9000. GE cited 65,000 horsepower, which seems to scaled more reasonably when compared to the RB211 XWB https://www.ge.com/news/reports/ge-oil-gas-just-turned-worlds-largest-jet-engine-65-megawatt-power-plant?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=...


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