21

The answer you are looking for is: 9V-SMF. Current registration number: 9V-SMF (source) Let's try to add some related details. Aircraft can have multiple ID during their life, at least a preliminary ID to be used by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the customer, and then at least a national registry ID. Manufacturer pre-delivery ID Airbus aircraft ...


18

The registration number painted on the aircraft is required to match the aircraft's registration certificate (and airworthiness certificate). If the numbers don't match the aircraft's paperwork isn't in order, and it can't legally be flown. There is a procedure for changing your N number which is usually used to put a "special" (reserved) number on an ...


16

The FAA provides an online reporting tool here I would say it falls under "aviation concern". In your description if you include tail number and time they should be able to figure out who was flying (or in the cockpit if its a 2 man situation). You can also contact your local FSDO and report the tail number and time of incident. Aircraft owners/renters (the ...


15

It's not just small aircraft in the US - all aircraft with US registration follow the same rules. The FAA has guidelines on how an N number must be formed. Basically, there are relatively few limits - you can have N + up to 5 characters, up to 2 of which can be letters (at the end). Here's what the FAA has to say: U.S. registration numbers may not exceed ...


15

Aircraft registration are no more or less public than car registrations (although they are a bit easier to get access to). Generally speaking you can go down to the DMV and request data on a plate number, for example here is the form for doing it in PA (there is a fee involved). Since cars are registered by state its up to the states how this works, planes ...


15

Under FAA jurisdiction, these items are regulated under 14 CFR 45. The size of the registration markings must generally be at least 12 inches high: §45.29 (a) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this section, each operator of an aircraft must display marks on the aircraft meeting the size requirements of this section. (b) Height. Except as ...


14

The origins of this can be traced back to CINA (the Commission Internationale de Navigation Aerienne / the Convention for the Regulation of Air Navigation) established as part of the Paris Peace Conference immediately after WWI. A part of this conference was the adoption of a system of international aircraft identification still in use today. The U.S. ...


13

14 CFR 45 subpart C governs the display of "nationality and registration marks". 14 CFR 45.21 says: Except as provided in §45.22, no person may operate a U.S.-registered aircraft unless that aircraft displays nationality and registration marks in accordance with the requirements of this section and §§45.23 through 45.33. Section 45.22 gives some ...


13

If it has a US registration number on it (N followed by 1-5 numbers or letters) you can search the FAA registration database to find out what aircraft has that particular registration number, and who owns it. In the case of a 4-5 foot styrofoam wing this would likely only be useful if the aircraft in question was a registered UAV. Some common sense needs to ...


13

Most accidents are referred to by flight number It depends who it is that is referring to the accident, and on who they are addressing. News media and the general public Newpapers and other media use flight numbers because that is the number known to friends and relatives of the individuals concerned and because most members of the public who have flown ...


10

Yes. The tail numbers are indeed places on a placard inside the cockpits of commercial airplanes. Following are some examples:


10

That's because the aircraft (some of them at least) are leased from Aerotron Ireland Ltd., an aircraft leasing company in Drogheda Ireland. I only looked up one. It was EI-FVA. Here it shows it being registered to Aerotron on Aug 23, 2016. And here it shows it entering Blue Panorama's fleet on Dec 8, 2016.


9

Yes, on a commercial airliner typically the tail number and the SELCAL (if so equipped) are placarded on the panel. It's hard to find sometimes in picture because it may be behind the yoke, but it should be there somewhere.


9

The tail number is the civil registration, and the manufacturer serial number (MSN) is a build number used by the manufacturer. It is similar to the licence plate on your car, and the vehicle identification number applied by the builder of the car.


8

The step-to-step guide: 1. Search for Flight Number: Get hold of the flight number, such as LH123 or AA789 for instance. This is usually found on your ticket, baggage tag or some email. Enter it on a site such as www.flightradar24.com or www.planefinder.net. Note down the registration (such as N1234A or D-ABYT) for the flight on the day your are interested ...


8

I don't think the information is accessible on a public website. According to the German wikipedia the Luftfahrtbundesamt (LBA, the German Civil Aviation Authorities) cannot publish the information for data protection law reasons. On their website (in German) they state that they do release information to members of the public at a fee (they love that ...


7

Aircraft don't have to be actually flying for people to notice something fishy going on. In particular, there are always people hanging about at airports keeping an eye on everything going on. Furthermore (at least in the US), aircraft registration details are a matter of public record and can be easily looked up online. For example, here is the ...


7

I seriously doubt there's any system that would have such information for a non-trivial number of aircraft. Not only is the information pretty irrelevant except for the purpose of internal planning by the owner/operator of the aircraft (who obviously have it for their own aircraft in their internal systems), it's also liable to change suddenly. For example ...


7

The usual way would be to find out which airline operates that aircraft. Usually Google will give the answer. Otherwise planespotters.net will help. In this case it is Norwegian. Then seatguru will show you what the interior configuration is. I don't know whether these website have public API's that could help you and I think that is a bit off topic for ...


7

The FAA has a page that sort-of takes you through this process. Basically it boils down to this: If your registration has expired you still have ~90 days to register the aircraft If a renewal application was first received by the Registry after the expiration date, the renewal process no longer applies. An aircraft owner may apply for registration of an ...


7

You verify new (expiring) registrations the same way you verified the old ("for life") registrations -- by looking at the document. You just have to pay attention now (it's not just "It's there", you need to check the expiration date too). New-style registration certificates (issued some time after October 2010) are supposed to have the expiration date ...


7

In the US, aircraft numbers are requested or reserved from an available list by the aircraft owner: N-Number Availability Query. Then the owner, the manufacturer in the case of new aircraft, submits an application for registration with the reserved or available number. This order of events (to reserve then request assignment) is important as registration ...


7

N133AA appeared on an American Airlines DC10, but American Airlines retired, sold or scrapped all their DC10 and MD11 aircraft by 2002, releasing the registrations for other uses. Wind the clock forward 15 years and somebody has used N133AA for a Robinson R44 helicopter. I speculate that the effective owner of the helicopter is one Agustin Anaya, who ...


6

Two other answers specify the algorithm for generating valid U.S. aviation IDs. Many who view this question might also be interested to learn that the aviation scheme is part of the entire U.S. radio station identifier scheme. IDs beginning with AA-AL, K, N, and W are allocated to the U.S. (by ITU). CF-CK are used in Canada, DA-DR in Germany, etc. ...


6

For the US, this is covered in AC120-26L, or in a more human-interpretable way from an NBAA article. When are you required to use your aircraft registration By default unless you have a callsign Can anyone use whatever call sign they want or is it limited to airlines only? What you use must be registered. For international flights if you fly ...


6

Yes, every aircraft has a registration number--or "tail number" since it is commonly painted on/near the tail. This links each make/model/serial combination to a specific owner, similar to a car's license plate. Each country assigns tail numbers with that country's unique one-, two- or three-letter prefix(es), e.g. "N" for the USA and "XA" for Mexico, ...


5

The reg number's only set in stone once the plane takes off, so you'll only get this information for past flights. Equipment can and often does change between hops on the same flight number, and a multi-stop flight can even arrive at one gate and depart at a different one because of a scheduled plane change (or a last-minute one). The routing/scheduling ...


5

If you come up blank on the various open sources that have been suggested, which wouldn't surprise me, your best bet may be a personal letter to Air Canada and another as well to whatever headquarters address you can find for Jazz, explaining what you are attempting to do, and asking if they'd be willing to look up the aircraft ID for those flights for you. ...


5

Aircraft registration numbers are assigned by the country where the aircraft is registered. Each country has a prefix (see the full list on Wikipedia), like e.g. D- for Germany. The prefix is usually separated from the rest by a dash, but some countries deviate from this, most notably the United States, where registration numbers begin with N. Whether or ...


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