91

Practically speaking, the 'heavy' designator ('super' for A380 and An225) is to help enforce separation requirements due to wake turbulence. In case of AF1, it is not as if other aircraft are going to be allowed near it, so the designator is redundant. Regulation wise, FAA JO 7110.65T Section 4. Radio and Interphone Communications, specifically states that ...


52

The scenario you're asking about is common. Let's say that your Delta 158 from South Korea to Detroit is running several hours late, and the decision is made to operate the A320 DTW-BOS on time. ATC doesn't accept having two aircraft flying with the same callsign at once due to exactly the sort of confusion you suggest, so something has to change. What ...


50

What that probably means is that the pilot is reporting that they have ATIS information kilo. Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) is a radio broadcast on a specific frequency (often a local navaid like a VOR) which a pilot dials up to get weather and airport information before joining one of the airfield's frequencies. Each time the information is ...


34

Delta Air Lines uses the ICAO three-letter designator DAL and the ICAO telephony designator (also known as callsign) DELTA. In general, callsigns should be similar or equal to the name of the airline according to the following ICAO rules: 3.2 In the registration of telephony designators the following rules will apply: a) the chosen telephony ...


29

Tactical call signs are typically given in the format "word" "number" - "number". For example, Camel 1-1. In this example Camel 1-1 is the lead Camel in the Camel flight. As you may have guessed, instructions are always acknowledged in order. This helps the lead aircraft determine who may not have received the instruction (and some instructions are ...


23

The purpose of the "heavy" designator is create situational awareness because of its wake turbulence. There are also different separation requirements when following a heavy aircraft. Since all air traffic around Air Force 1 is likely to be heavily controlled, there's no need to call out that it's a heavy.


21

ICAO Annex 10 - Aeronautical Telecommunications Vol 2 When replying, you end the message with the call sign. 5.2.1.9.2.2 PANS.— An aircraft station should acknowledge receipt of important air traffic control messages or parts thereof by reading them back and terminating the readback by its radio call sign. Note 1.— Air traffic control ...


18

When multiple U.S. military aircraft are operating in formation, they do so as a "flight". This flight has a callsign, and in the case of Presidential transport flights, this callsign is the Presidential one, such as Air Force One or Marine One. For POTUS transport using a fixed-wing aircraft, the flight typically consists of a single aircraft, usually one ...


17

I'd expect Executive One: Executive One is the call sign designated for any United States civil aircraft when the President of the United States is on board.


17

Air Force One is the call sign of whatever USAF aircraft (see @slookabill's comment below) the US President travels in. Once he boards another aircraft, the call sign AF1 is transferred to that aircraft (for a dramatic example of this, see the climax of Air Force One movie). If a president were to fly in their own aircraft (or commercially) the appropriate ...


17

As best I can tell, Amazon Air does not hold its own air carrier certificate; they contract with cargo airlines to operate their flights. Per Wikipedia, those contractors are Air Transport International, ABX Air, and Atlas Air. These operators then use their own callsigns. For example, the aircraft shown in your first link, N1997A ("Amazon One"), is ...


17

Delta DOES have its own callsign. It's "DELTA". There are literally thousands of airlines in the world, many of which have designated radio telephony callsigns. Some of them are very close or even identical to the airline name, others are more diverse. Bianfable gives a good explanation regarding the origin of the Speedbird callsign. While not the case ...


12

Executive One is used while the President is on a civil aircraft according to FAA JO 7110.65W (.pdf). Apparently, this information hasn't been published in the AIM for a while. (b) When the President is aboard a civil aircraft, state the words “Executive One.” (Page 2-4-10)


11

As I am sure you are aware, the convention is that any aircraft that has the current US president on board is given the "One" call sign. For military aircraft, this is the branch of the military followed by "One", which is why you have Air Force One, Marine One, Navy One. If he is on a civilian jet, it is called Executive One. The actual plane that ...


11

It's a solution to the Call-sign Confusion. Many large airlines operate call sign de-confliction programmes. These involve reviewing company call signs to ensure that aircraft with similar call signs are not likely to be routinely in the same airspace at the same time, and a process to systematically resolve ongoing issues arising from reports of similar ...


11

The 'Center' suffix is indeed more common in the US for the en-route call-signs under radar control. There is also New York Radio, for example, for the non-radar service over the Atlantic. Another example is the 'Director' suffix that is not common in the US, but is common elsewhere for the final approach controller. In this case we need a referee, enter ...


9

Marine one is the call sign of any of the (300+) United States Marine Corps aircraft carrying the President of the United States. So, if he's not on board, the aircraft reverts back to its original radio call sign. In case you are asking about the Marine Helicopter Squadron One, you can find the ID from helis.com. HMX-1 uses the call sign 'NIGHTHAWK' ...


9

One of the suggested communication strategies for uncontrolled airports is to announce the type of aircraft and color. e.g. “Brown and white Cherokee entering downwind”. Rather than using your initials, which like the tail number, don‘t really give any information, why not use your color or some distinguishing feature. e.g “Red tricycle ultralight” or “...


9

It starts with the International Telecommunications Union, which assigned radio call sign prefixes for each country in 1927. The OK prefix was assigned to Czechoslovakia. Other than the largest countries (US, USSR, UK, France, etc.) there seems to be no specific pattern to the assignments. When ICAO assigned aircraft registration prefixes for each country it ...


9

These designators are assigned, on request, by ICAO. The request is made by the applicant through their National Aviation Autority. There are actually two designators: the ICAO three letter code and the ICAO R/T designator. All assigned designators are published in ICAO document 8585. Two things are to be considered: The three letter code must be unique ...


9

The controller was probably referring to an airplane in a different livery but operating under the American call sign. A likely example is US Airways. After the two companies merged, from October 2015 all flights were operated under the American call sign, but re-painting the US Airways planes took at least a couple years. This is not standard phraseology ...


8

The standard procedure for a pilot: 1. Who do I want to talk to? 2. Who am I? 3. Where am I? (not necessarily needed after initial contact) 4. What do I want? After initial contact, some of the requirements may be ignored when back and forth communication is happening, without other airplanes talking to that ATC. For read back, it is needed that the ...


7

Who assigns these callsigns, and what is the pattern for the naming? Callsigns are allocated by ICAO. Their Annex 10 Radiotelephony Procedures says 5.2.1.7.2 Radiotelephony call signs for aircraft 5.2.1.7.2.1 Full call signs 5.2.1.7.2.1.1 An aircraft radiotelephony call sign shall be one of the following types: Type a) — the ...


7

It is all in your link (in the "See Also"), E.g.: Brazil: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_Air_Force_One France: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotam_001 India: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_One Japan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Air_Force_One Vatican: "Shepherd One", or just in Italy "Volo Papale #" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


6

For the US, this is covered in AC120-26L, or in a more human-interpretable way from an NBAA article. When are you required to use your aircraft registration By default unless you have a callsign Can anyone use whatever call sign they want or is it limited to airlines only? What you use must be registered. For international flights if you fly ...


6

It is no problem to have the same call sign on the same day. As long as the same call sign is not uses at the same time there is no problem. For VFR flights, the same call sign can even be used at the same time as long as it is not in the same airspace. Many of the ADS-B duplicated call signs on a single are aircraft registrations coded in the ...


6

I fly a Part 103 Ultralight. I simply use "Ultralight" when announcing my position and intentions. If there are any other ultralights in the area, I will add the color for a more descriptive designator "Blue and White Ultralight". Also, if I am flying in a close group of other ultralights (50-100 yards apart or so), Only one of us will simply announce, for ...


6

I couldn't find any specific guidance on this, the AIM 4-2-4(a)(3) just says (emphasis mine): Civil aircraft pilots should state the aircraft type, model or manufacturer’s name, followed by the digits/letters of the registration number. When the aircraft manufacturer’s name or model is stated, the prefix “N” is dropped; e.g., Aztec Two Four Six ...


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