59

In order to fly commercial you will need a first class medical certificate, and getting that with aspergers is going to be tough. The first consideration is the safety or people in the air and on the ground, so the criteria is conservative. Getting a first class medical would mean lots of extra hoops, even if it is possible. If you did get a medical you ...


37

No. The purpose of air traffic control is to prevent collisions and expidite and maintain an orderly flow of air traffic. An air traffic controller has no say in who gets to fly and who doesn't. Refusing a certain flight would be something that needs to be done at a political level, and certainly far away from an operational level. Also remember that, ...


35

See Page 9 of TCDS A.064 ANNEX - Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 - Special Conditions TCDS A.064 ANNEX - Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 - Special Conditions EQUIVALENT SAFETY FINDING E-2107: Passenger Extension to 180 APPLICABILITY: A320 REQUIREMENTS: JAR 25.807 ADVISORY MATERIAL: N/A ...


34

There could be a lot of reasons for this... EU closed airspace to 737's MAX 8's on March 12 They needed to go into a holding pattern until ATC figured out where to put them They needed to be in the holding pattern until they could get a landing slot They were redirected to an airport that had a maintenance facility that the airline uses They redirected to ...


30

(This is very closely related to this question, and see this one too.) At least in the US, cutting into fuel reserves isn't an emergency by itself. But assuming that things have gone beyond "minimum fuel" and you clearly need priority for landing then you should indeed declare an emergency. The wording you mentioned seems 'weak' to me; if you do have to ...


28

There is no limit to the number of type ratings that a person can hold. The world record for most type ratings held by an individual currently stands at 105! For safety reasons, most airlines only allow a pilot to be currently assigned to two aircraft types at one time so that they don't start to confuse the different airplanes and mix things up. This isn't ...


25

In the US you have, effectively, zero rights over the airspace above your land by default: Control of airspace is entirely delegated to the FAA, and they're super serious about it. If you designate your land as an airport you can certainly establish a control tower and request an airspace designation from the FAA - whether or not they approve your plan ...


23

In the US, taxi time can be logged. 14 CFR 61.51 says the pilot must log (emphasis mine): Total flight time or lesson time. And 14 CFR 1.1 says (emphasis mine): Flight time means: (1) Pilot time that commences when an aircraft moves under its own power for the purpose of flight and ends when the aircraft comes to rest after landing; or (...


22

FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 150/5300-13A covers "standards and recommendations for airport design." It does not include any restrictions on proximity to bodies of water, but it does make the following recommendation in paragraph 319(a): It is recommended that the entire RSA and RPZ be accessible to rescue and fire-fighting vehicles such that no part of the ...


18

In Bernstein of Leigh v Skyviews [1978] 1 QB 479, the High Court of England and Wales held that, at common law, the right of a landowner to the airspace above their land was "to such height as was necessary for the ordinary use and enjoyment of his land and the structures upon it". As another answer has suggested, the use of UK airspace is now regulated by ...


18

European Civil Aviation Authorities use the imperial system to depict altitudes and airspace restrictions (feet), speeds (knots) and distances (nautical miles). Some VFR aircraft have speed indicators in km/h, gliders can have altitude and variometer in meters and meters/second and apart from a special ICAO VFR chart being available in metric in Germany, ...


18

ICAO According to an IFALPA Briefing Leaflet of 2012 "Amendment 36 to ICAO Annex 6 Part I" The pilot-in-command shall advise ATC of a minimum fuel state by declaring MINIMUM FUEL when, having committed to land at a specific aerodrome, the pilot calculates that any change to the existing clearance to that aerodrome may result in landing with less ...


17

First of all, this aircraft was flying in Europe, not in FAA land. In Europe there is no general limitation to 250 knots below 10000 ft. There is no EASA airspace restrictions, every country has their own set of rules. There are airspaces that have speed restrictions below 10000 ft, others don't and sometimes aircraft are allowed to go faster than 250 knots ...


17

There are indeed several steps between a pure glider and a powered aircraft. The criteria were historically quite simple: Gliders with an auxiliary engine, which is just for getting them home in adverse weather, but not powerful enough for take-off. The propeller is in almost all cases retractable, so their aerodynamics is identical to their pure glider ...


17

A frozen ATPL holder is somebody who has passed all the required (14) exams for the issue of an ATPL but does not have the required flying hours. Strictly speaking, there is no such thing as a 'frozen' ATPL, though a number of training schools do use the term: A Frozen ATPL holder refers to somebody who has passed all the required theoretical exams but ...


15

From a private pilot's perspective, there are two possible options: a foreign-based license or a 'full' FAA pilot's license. The first type is defined in 14 CFR 61.75, which starts like this: §61.75 Private pilot certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license. (a) General. A person who holds a foreign pilot license at the private ...


15

I will answer your question with what we can see in Brazilian Airspace and its rules. In Brazil, there are some airports - non towered, operated by radio stations - which give information such as wind direction/intensity and temperature and QNH. Based on this information, the pilot decides on which runway they will land or take off, and relays this message ...


15

The Canadian Arctic has B737 scheduled airline operations to many uncontrolled airports that have no control tower.


14

Europe uses imperial for distance (nm), speed (knots) and altitude (feet). Russia and China are the only major countries that use meters for altitude - and it causes all sorts of confusion. Some aircraft (more in europe) use kilometers and statute miles/hour on the ASI - but the same is true in the US.


14

No, ETOPS is not satisfied solely by range circles, but (among other things) by the "time needed to fly to that airport". See the requirements of 14 CFR 121.633 (emphasis mine): (a) For ETOPS up to and including 180 minutes, no person may list an airport as an ETOPS Alternate Airport in a dispatch or flight release if the time needed to fly to that ...


14

This is just because of the way EASA treated B737 MAX grounding. They just stopped accepting flights with these aircraft into the EU airspace even for already airborne flights with valid flight plans. For this company two flights were involved. On from Cape Verde ended up in Tunisia and one from Dubai in Ankara. Both of them were originally hoping to get ...


14

It has nothing to do with LVP, but with the fact that there are standard routes at Schiphol to the main piers; From the AIP AD 2.1 (EHAM) section 2.1: Aircraft shall comply with the standard taxi routings to and from the stands as depicted on AD 2.EHAM-GMC. Deviations from the standard taxi routings will be given timely to the pilot by Schiphol Ground. ...


13

For the FAA, a "complex aeroplane" must have: A retractable gear (not necessary for a seaplane); In-flight adjustable flaps; and A controllable pitch propeller. The FAA's definition is given in 14 CFR 61.1: Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, including airplanes equipped ...


13

It will not work in EASA for a variety of reasons. Of the top of my head: Like Lnafziger mentioned, you will need to do at least 10 hours solo. Most jet engines (but the smallest such as the D-Jet) have a minimum required crew of two. Also, you are not allowed to switch airplanes in the PPL course (ie. fly solo with one airplane and dual with another see ...


13

In the UK, you have rights up to about 1000 feet According to In Brief (a free legal-information website written by legal experts) The common law distinguishes between two different types of airspace. The lower and Upper stratum. The lower stratum is concerned with the portion immediately above the land and interference with this air space would ...


13

This will differ from country to country, but I will give an example based on the German law, so you can derive how countries can work with airspace. In general, following BGB §905, the airspace above and ground below your property is also yours, unlimited. Das Recht des Eigentümers eines Grundstücks erstreckt sich auf den Raum über der Oberfläche und ...


13

It's going to depend on the specifics and severity of your condition. You can't generalize autism spectrum disorders. But Aspergers should not exclude you from flying. Flying commercial is another story. There's only one way to find out, so if you are really serious, you should contact the certification board and find out what the challenges are going to be. ...


12

There is no such limit indeed. Princess Juliana International Airport in Sint Maarten is possibly the most iconic example of airport located near a water body, because of the beach over which airliners fly when approaching RWY 09. As other mentioned, they are numerous other examples of airports that may be even closer to a water body (i.e. without a beach in ...


12

This is what I could find. I looked on the Civil Aviation Authority's website and found this article. Seating Allocation Families, children and infants The seating of children close by their parents or guardians should be the aim of airline seat allocation procedures for family groups and large parties of children. Young children and ...


12

American Airlines operates an A319 seasonally from DFW to Gunnison (KGUC), which is an uncontrolled airport. There are probably many other similar examples. An airline flight arriving at an uncontrolled field operates just like any other aircraft: it will almost certainly be IFR and fly an instrument approach, or a visual approach if conditions allow it. ...


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