163

That one thing is to unload the rotor too much (i.e. "push on the stick"): From explainxkcd: ... Unfortunately, as soon as the rotor stops spinning, the whole aircraft falls like a brick and the rotor may be impossible to restart in flight. This is a situation that should be avoided at all costs. Normally it is not a problem since the weight of ...


61

Blown tire - can't raise gear, shredded tire will not fit in the bay. -> Gear down - much lower maximum speed and lots of additional drag -> Both of those mean very poor fuel economy -> Very poor fuel economy means not enough fuel to reach destination So that's off the table. Given that, there's no question that it's better to follow the safest ...


41

That kind of thing would be a judgment call on the part of the crew (ultimately the capt) and would come down to what is the safest action based on the circumstances, with logistical/convenience considerations being a distant second. When you have a blown tire you will want to avoid raising the gear, because they can catch fire and you don't want to ...


38

Which fuel tanks are used in order of priority in aircraft? What you're talking about, in large aircraft, is often referred to as the fuel burn schedule. Light aircraft generally do not have a fuel burn schedule though they may have have minimal requirements. The fuel burn schedule is dictated by the aircraft design and is thus different for different ...


36

The pilot (and the ATC) use the UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). The flight's departure and arrival are in terms of the local times at the respective airports. As for data logging, the FDR/CVR usually records in UTC (preferred) or the relative time count (usually count increments each 4 seconds of system operation). See Appendix M to Part 121 - Airplane ...


31

On long-haul flights, most passengers will want to sleep, often including when the aircraft is flying through daylight. It's especially common on East-West long-haul flights for lots of people to want to sleep when it's daylight outside the aircraft, since the aircraft will often be crossing many time zones (and, during the summer months, also often flying ...


25

The question speaks of a very old 747 landing tutorial. And as such I take that to mean it would be of a 747-100/200 aircraft, and that's the reference point I'm answering from. First, concerning the comments below the question that wonder whether you have to worry about unwanted objects on a runway at an international airport, there is no such thing as a ...


25

To expand on Quiet Flyer's answer, it's technical and economic at the same time. Technical: Winch is limiting because you are deposited in the same spot over the field, whereas a tow, if the pilot knows what he's doing, can take you to a thermal up to a few miles from the field. Plus you can get towed higher. If you had to choose the launch method that ...


23

If an airplane is close to V1, the brakes - which have to absorb kinetic energy and dissipate heat - can get hot to the point where the tires automatically deflate, to prevent them from exploding. For a 747 this involves a lot of smoke and glowing brake disks.


23

ICAO SARPs Annex 2 (Rules of the Air) states: 3.5 Time 3.5.1 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) shall be used and shall be expressed in hours and minutes and, when required, seconds of the 24-hour day beginning at midnight. 3.5.2 A time check shall be obtained prior to operating a controlled flight and at such other times during the flight ...


21

I believe what the comic is referencing is Mast Bumping. Rotor blades are very flexible, and for a bunch of reasons, are free to pivot around the mast.(The shaft the blades are spinning around) In normal flight, the blades are held taut by centrifugal forces and the weight of the rotor craft they are supporting. If a pilot were to suddenly push down on the ...


21

This is a well known problem with gyrocopters. The first answer was partially correct in that the problem was caused by pushing the stick forward and unloading the rotor. However, the problem wasn't a slowing down of the blade. The actual problem was that many of these gyrocopters would tumble under these conditions. If you were close to the ground you would ...


17

In most modern jets (e.g. Boeing 757/767) when you pull the fire handle the engine shuts down (fuel, hydraulic, etc., are cutoff). But pulling the fire handle only "arms" the extinguishing system. You have to rotate the handle (left or right) to discharge a bottle. (there are other bottle configurations based on the airplane type, but this is the general ...


17

These are the main challenges I can think of: High takeoff and landing speed: To generate enough lift for takeoff in the thinner air at FL300 (gravity has almost not decreased, so required lift stays almost the same), very high speeds are required. Combine this with less thrust from the engines available and you need very long runways. It should still be ...


16

At least in the United States the FAA recently (I think in 2012?) changed the recommendation for transponder operation in the AIM. It now reads: Civil and military transponders should be turned to the “on" or normal altitude reporting position prior to moving on the airport surface to ensure the aircraft is visible to ATC surveillance systems. IN ALL ...


16

I used to work at a sport parachuting center - we occasionally had photographers rent one of our Cessna 182 airplanes for the same purpose. An advantage of jump planes is the pilots are quite used to odd attitudes (and even odder requests) so a 60 degree bank angle with the door open and you leaning out of it will get a reply of "no problem". Our conditions ...


16

The outcome depends on the speed, aircraft, weight, and other factors. If the takeoff is aborted at low speed (maybe up to 30-40kts), there may be no issues. The pilot would be able to vacate the runway and taxi back down to the end (assuming whatever caused the aborted takeoff is resolved). Weights closer to the maximum takeoff weight or speeds closer to ...


16

For takeoff and landing, @bianfable pointed out the answer. For longer flights across timezones, they set them to dark in order to not disturb passengers who would like to sleep. And yes, I personally hate it when they do that and avoid the 787 whenever possible.


13

There are two reasons I can think of off the bat: Its possible the controller asked them to hold a slow speed due to increased traffic ahead. The brakes may have been deployed to match the speed requested. I have heard this called on occasion over the radio in the terminal area I fly. The controller cleared them for a steeper decent than usual this would ...


12

There is actually a really good example of this... In 1994 it was decided that the infamous Meigs Field would be demolished and turned into a park. (I say infamous because for all of us young flight simulator aficionados this is the home airport of Microsoft Flight Simulator). On a Sunday night, March 30, 2003, the Mayor Daley of Chicago ordered the ...


12

Well, this depends a little on your situation. In all cases your goal is get on the ground in a controlled manner that leaves the pilot, passengers, and airframe intact - so obviously you'll be heading for the nearest airport (and if you can get in contact with ATC and explain your situation doing so would be a really good idea). No signs of carb ice (...


12

Parking brakes are used by commercial aircraft at the gate if the ground crew can not set the chocks. The most common time for this to happen is during a lightning storm when ground crews are not allowed on the ramp. Large airports like DFW have automatic parking lights that will guide the aircraft to the proper alignment and stopping point. The crew will ...


12

I wanted to add to 757toga's answer. In addition to being required to "pull" the fire handle before you can discharge the fire suppressant, which cuts off the fuel, hydraulics, electrical generation and pneumatic flow to and from the engine. Even aircraft that do not have fire suppression systems (such as the B-52), require the fire handle to be pulled if ...


11

In general terms, the higher you are the better your fuel efficiency, so you will want to climb quickly and then stay as high as you can until you need to start your descent in order to land. For jets, a common way to approximate your top of descent is by using the "3:1 rule" where you take your desired altitude loss in thousands of feet and multiply it by ...


11

Well, the first caveat is that the best plane for aerial photography is one that someone else is flying -- Trying to set up shots while also maneuvering an aircraft is difficult at best, and can be dangerous. Hitting your specific points: Good view of the ground This generally implies a high wing aircraft, assuming you're shooting from inside the plane. (...


11

Those are spoilers...not speed brakes. They do increase drag, but their primary function is that they kill lift. They allow the aircraft to lose altitude rapidly without pointing the nose downhill and picking up speed. You will also see them deploy upon touch down. At high speeds they increase drag and thereby aid in deceleration, but again they kill ...


10

I'm not aware of the Brodie landing system used anywhere now. The system was actually a response to the pressing problem of non-availability of escort carriers in required numbers, similar to the British CAM ships, that launched hurricanes on one-way missions. The only difference being that the aircraft could be retrieved here. The main advantage of the ...


10

From a regulatory standpoint the governing regulation is FAR 23 (airworthiness standards for what we'd generally call "small" airplanes - Normal, Utility, Acrobatic, and Commuter category). FAR 23.3 is probably what you're interested in, and tells us: Normal Category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine ...


10

Two words: chase planes. A few more words: The easiest way to film an airplane in flight is with another airplane in flight. Here's one article on how that's done, including images captured from both sides; the chase plane (a Learjet 25B) getting the shots of the 787 Dreamliner, and crew aboard the Dreamliner getting a few snapshots of the chase plane. ...


10

Is winch launching relatively rarer in the USA than in the rest of the world? Definitely. If so, why? At least in part because airplane fuel, as well as some other costs associated with powered aviation, are cheaper in the US than in many other countries.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible