We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
80

Advantages of towbarless pushback. You don't have to store different tow-bars for different a/c types. This is especially good for ground handlers who handle different airlines with different aircraft types. Also handy for ad-hoc one-off flights. Removing need for tow-bars means one thing less to check daily, weekly, monthly, annually. Towing with a tow-bar ...


69

Yes. Human beings can get sucked into jet engines if they are close enough- this has happened multiple times in a number of aircraft ranging from A319 to A6E intruder. However, it happens only in rare cases- usually in case of miscommunication or a mistake, when safety procedures are not followed. The following image shows the safety hazard area for ...


53

The "headset man" is a wing walker, and he is there for a reason - he is not just someone who needs a ride to where the aircraft is being pushed to. Essentially, he is an extra pair of eyes for the tow driver. He needs be able to see everything going on around the aircraft to avoid collisions with other aircraft or stationary objects. This task cannot be ...


52

what is the minimum or maximum weight that these engines can suck? Quite a lot, considering they can ingest ramp equipment... This is a JAL 747 ingesting a baggage container. Delta L-1011 doing the same.


48

Flare (pyrotechnic) type According to Wikipedia and ynetnews.com, the flare system burns at low temperatures and doesn't pose a danger. Nonetheless Europe in 2006 objected to it and Switzerland threatened to ground El Al if such system was found on board. "If we catch Israeli planes fitted with this system in our airports, they will be grounded," a ...


46

The taxiway is being used for parking. Specifically, parking of two MD-80s that have attracted press attention—The Australian: Clive Palmer’s $10m in tax-haven jets sitting idle: TWO 155-seat jets owned by Clive Palmer and branded with the name of his controversial and longtime loss-making company Mineralogy sit mothballed in a remot­e corner of ...


45

There's a good example which is the A319 LR which flies scientists down to Antartica. They utilize (very) little ground support, except for the stairs (they seem to have inbuilt ones in the front as well, although these are not used on site) and the trucks to offload the cargo. APU provides the power on the ground, and the aircraft has sufficient juice in ...


42

The aviation industry is already running at near-peak efficiency, performing crucial tasks simultaneously to ensure quick turn-around. Trying to speed up the boarding process by allowing entrance from both ends would be doable with a large amount of changes to the existing process, in both operations and infrastructure. However, the result would be ...


40

Some B-29s had reversible pitch propellers. All the B-29s used for the Atomic bomb missions had reversible pitch propellers. Wikipedia B-29 Variants Moreover, engine packages changed; including the type of propellers and range of the variable pitch. A notable example were the eventual 65 airframes (up to 1947's end) for the Silverplate and successor-name ...


38

The airports that feature this parking orientation are of small size, with the apron (or part of it) very close to the runway. Taking Dortmund Airport as an example: When an aircraft of a certain size (for example Airbus A319, Boeing 737) reaches one of the parking positions 5-12, it is pushed backwards into its parking position. The engines are switched ...


37

A couple of my CFIs have asked me to help them park the airplane (in absence of a tow bar) when I was pushing the airplane by putting one hand on the hub and the other on the propeller near the hub, and them (the CFIs) pushing the tail down and nose wheel elevated. But according to AOPA, it is not a good thing: ... never push or pull on the prop blades. ...


36

Here in the United States these are called blast fences. They protect whatever may be behind them from the direct effects of jet blast by directing the blast upwards.


36

This is a ground power unit (GPU) which supplies the aircraft with electricity while the generators or the auxiliary power unit (APU) are not running. This is important especially during boarding, when the cabin lighting needs to remain on for passengers to embark or disembark. The GPU is also used to start the APU, which in turn provides electricity to ...


36

It's happened before, both with civilian and military aircraft. This video was shot in 1991. Crews ready an A-6E attack aircraft for launch aboard Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) for a night sortie over Iraq during Operation Desert Storm when a fatigued green shirt walks in front of the port jet intake at full power. He is one of the few people who had this ...


33

How are aircraft aligned with these bridges They are not (but read on) Aircraft are aligned to a point on the concrete, not to the jetbridge(s). It is the jetbridge itself that carries out the final alignment to the aircraft door. Jetbridges are actually motor vehicles with wheels, tyres, motors and (often) steering. It just happens that their rear end ...


32

Those lights are used to show obstacles that may interfere with the aircraft's course, such as antennas, buildings, wind turbines, and they are mandatory. The name of those lights is Aircraft Warning Lights, and here is an article from Wikipedia about them.


30

They are specially designed apron jet bridges. It looks like the normal gates but required to transfer passenger by bus. A model shows how it runs (credit) :


29

It is a temperature probe for the preconditioned air (PC air) unit. Bleed air is required in order to operate the air conditioning packs on an aircraft*. Thus, either an engine or the auxiliary power unit (APU) must remain running, burning jet fuel. PC air pumps heated or cooled air into the aircraft and allows the pilot to shut down the engines and APU ...


29

Quite simple ― use a (special) towbar! Aircraft with such unique front wheels (like the Antonov An-225 Mriya and Lockheed C-5 Galaxy) carry their own towbar around, which is then attached to the tugs for movement. For example, here is the Galaxy's towbar: From left to right: 68th Airlift Squadon loadmasters, Senior Airman Katy Mackey, Master Sgt. Kevin ...


28

They simply aren't necessary. Brake lights are on road vehicles because often they travel at relatively high speeds, and follow relatively close to one another. If a driver suddenly slows, the brake lights help provide a visual cue (which grabs the attention of other drivers, and is visible from quite a long distance) that the vehicle intends to slow or ...


28

You can find a full list of airports on the continent here, the majority are ice/snow runways with two gravel runways at Rothera Air Facility and TNM. Supported is a loose term down there, however Williams Field which services McMurdo Station is groomed and has fuel available. Phoenix Airfield which also serves McMurdo can accept wheeled landings and seems ...


27

It's a steering bypass pin which isolates the nose wheel steering and enables the tug to turn the aircraft. The operator holds it up so that the captain can see it to confirm that it has been removed. This Wikipedia article refers to it On some types, there may also be a "downlock" pin which prevents the nosewheel gear from retracting whilst the aircraft ...


26

It depends on a number of factors like: the aircraft size and variant the range required the aircraft load equipment available Ground crew proficiency ...among others things. This figure from the 737 Airport Planning document gives 9 minutes for the fueling time for a Boeing 737-600: Image from B737 Airplane characteristics for Airport Planning The ...


25

There are actually two types of de-icing fluid, one is orange and one is green. According to a product safety sheet for one brand: The dye is intended to indicate which parts of the aircraft have been treated and to differentiate between fluids (Type I fluids are orange, Type IV fluids are green). As to why orange and green, presumably they aren't ...


25

Apart from blast fences, they also serve as wind breaks and to deflect engine noise away from the area behind them. And of course they can (and the one you showed looks like it might be) intended to be a visible marker of a closed taxiway or runway.


25

Yes. Here's an incident that happened at Mumbai (India) Airport in December 2015. A technician was sucked into the engine and killed. A news report of the incident and AvHeald report for completeness


24

I’ve not heard of software programs to do this, but the Navy has made use of a relatively low tech solution to address this problem for decades aboard their aircraft carriers. Known simply as the Ouija Board, the aircraft handler and his crew utilize a scaled physical map of both the carrier flight deck and hangar deck along with appropriately scaled ...


23

The claim that de-icing must have been done perfectly in Brussels or the plane would have crashed on take-off is patent nonsense. Ice on the aircraft degrades performance. A little bit of ice degrades performance a little bit; a lot of ice degrades performance a lot. It's perfectly possible that they took off from Brussels with slightly degraded performance, ...


23

The value will obviously vary for different aircraft models (and also with the loading, c.g. location etc), but the usual range can be found in the airport planning document for the particular airliner, where the values for ground clearance for the aircraft at the OEW (max. value) and MTW (min. value) would be given. The difference should give you the ...


22

Classic example of one corner case leading to a blanket belief. Grabbing a propeller by the tip, especially a wooden prop, can cause damage. In use, the tips generate most of the thrust but are also held straight by the rotational forces. Pulling on a prop right beside the hub will cause no harm - that's where the propellor thrust goes anyway. If you grab ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible