118

The reason is the large spinning thing on the front. Residual fuel in the engine has been known to auto-ignite (i.e. combust without a spark), causing the prop to spin, causing serious injuries and deaths. A lean cutoff reduces the risk that someone handling the prop will get maimed or killed. In a car when you turn the engine off usually it is in park or ...


117

Several advantages: Wing structures are hollow and voluminous in order to provide structural rigidity against flutter and carry flight loads. This provides the space needed to store fuel. On a conventional aircraft, placing fuel tanks in the wings places the fuel mass very close to, or on, the center of lift. This dramatically reduces Cg shift during ...


88

It's for wing bending relief (for cantilevered wings). As the generated lift bends the wings upward, the weight of the fuel will counter that. As the plane loses weight in-flight due to burning fuel, so does the need for wing bending relief (less weight → less lift), that's why the wing tanks are the last to be used. For context, a Boeing 777-200ER can ...


79

I see what you're saying, but there's something you're overlooking in your logic. You're looking at an airplane sitting on the ground, where the wheels are near the fuselage and most of the wings are dead weight that creates strain on the structure. Think about one in flight. Now all the lift is coming from the wings, imagine the airplane suspended by ...


60

You can find the full incident report here and this topic is touched upon briefly, but in short they had little to no time to entertain any other options but a full speed landing. It was not until the aircraft [was] on the final descent for landing that the Commander realised they could not reduce the thrust on the number 1 engine. The speed was not ...


58

Engine #2 wasn't doing its job either Had the situation just been engine #1 stuck at high thrust, with engine 2 normally controllable, than what you describe would be a reasonable response to the situation. However, that was not the case with CX780 -- during approach, Engine #2 was stuck at 17% N1 (or rather below idle) and thus delivering effectively nil ...


49

A quote from the book of regulations, Chapter 14, part 23, verse 951(b): (b) Each fuel system must be arranged so that— (1) No fuel pump can draw fuel from more than one tank at a time; or (2) There are means to prevent introducing air into the system. On a high wing aircraft satisfying #2 on that list is pretty easy: If you connect both tanks to ...


48

Having all the payload of a plane concentrated at the fuselage creates a large bending load on the wings in order to support that weight. Storing fuel in the wings allows some of that weight to be placed at the same place where it's being supported, in the wings. Distributing the weight into the wings reduces the loads where the wings meet the fuselage.


47

Maybe This is dependent on the air frame and varies from plane to plane and not all planes have capability of moving fuel although most large planes do. The Concorde moved fuel all over the place from its 13 tanks to cool the nose cone as well as trim the aircraft. It was perhaps one of the most complex implementations of such a system and kept the flight ...


38

Which fuel tanks are used in order of priority in aircraft? What you're talking about, in large aircraft, is often referred to as the fuel burn schedule. Light aircraft generally do not have a fuel burn schedule though they may have have minimal requirements. The fuel burn schedule is dictated by the aircraft design and is thus different for different ...


35

Combustion in a gasoline internal combustion engine for most aircraft, requires four things: fuel, oxygen, compression and ignition. If the engine is starved of fuel, accidental combustion (and an accidental spinning prop) will not happen. So shutting off the fuel is one way to prevent accidental "start" if even for one stroke. Oxygen is ubiquitous and ...


32

You're right. But it's not because of the slats. It's because of what the plane is doing when the slats are being used. The slat position is used in some system logic because it's indicative of a takeoff and approach. For example, on the MD-11 the engine ignition is automatically put into continuous mode when the slats are operated, because that's ...


29

It's both a maintenance and safety feature. You need a way to cut off fuel flow to the engine compartment, either to work on the engine, or because of a fire at the engine, or because you are doing a forced landing and it helps reduce the risk of your entire fuel contents seeping onto your hot engine if you bend things a bit putting it down and a fuel line ...


27

added weight increases the structural load applied to the wings different gravitational forces and wing-bending between full and empty tanks result in repeating stresses shortening the aircraft life-span As a result of the effects of lift (and the deceasing need for it as the plane lightens) the reverse is actually true see here higher risk of ...


26

No it is not normal. It can happen if the wing tanks are fully filled, typically for long trips or when the airline is tankering fuel to airports where fuel is more expensive. When cold fuel warms up it expands. With full tanks, the fuel has to go somewhere and it flows through the vent channels and will end up in the surge / vent tanks in the wing tips. ...


26

The conversation may have been about fuel pumps or fuel transfer valves but the flight attendant was probably told that as a simple explanation - it would not have been the real cause. Aircraft have multiple systems to pump fuel, transfer, and pipe it so no single failure will affect normal operation. For example, pumps have automatic bypass valves so ...


25

I wrote an email to AirZeroG and asked them: Other than the interior, are your aircraft modified in any way to handle zero-g flight? Here is the response that they gave me: Dear Sir, Except free floating area cabin configuration, there are very few differences with a “standard aircraft”. The most significant one is installation of Zero-G meters ...


25

Yes fuel is moved around, and balance is indeed an issue. The A330 has trim tanks in the horizontal stabiliser, and so does the A380. Fuel can be stored there to balance the aircraft - without trim tanks the stabiliser would be set to produce lift to balance the plane, and this causes extra drag. In the A380 fuel transfer occurs automatically, unless a ...


25

In 747-100/200 aircraft, takeoff was accomplished tank-to-engine (meaning each engine was fed from it's corresponding main tank). After takeoff the fuel burn schedule called for center tank fuel to be used after takeoff until exhausted. This was done by turning on jettison/override pumps in the center tanks that put fuel from the center tank into the common ...


22

You should check your POH but it may just be that the instructor in question was recently flying a lot of Pipers and it was force of [bad] habit. This POH for the 172S is in agreement with you. BEFORE LANDING .... Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH. You should consult the checklist in the POH that is with the airplane in question to be sure.


22

From the incident report section 1.1.4: a. At 0519 hrs during the descent to a cleared level of FL230, ECAM messages “ENG 1 CTL SYS FAULT” and “ENG 2 STALL” were annunciated within a short period of time. According to the Commander, a light “pop” sound was heard and some “ozone” and “burning” smell was detected shortly before the ECAM message “ENG ...


21

In gaseous form, the amount of -- the mass of -- hydrogen you could store in the volume of aircraft fuel tanks would be negligible. In order to store enough mass of hydrogen, you'd have to store it liquified, which is how it's stored in rockets. In order for that to be useful, though, you'd have to have engines entirely redesigned in order to burn cryogenic ...


20

FAA Advisory Circular AC 103-7, Paragraph 19 has this to say: MAXIMUM FUEL CAPACITY OF A POWERED ULTRALIGHT VEHICLE. The maximum fuel capacity for a powered ultralight vehicle is 5 U.S. gallons. Any powered ultralight with fuel tank(s) exceeding this capacity is ineligible for operation as an ultralight vehicle. a. Determination of ...


19

First, to debunk a myth regarding the Hindenberg, which always gets brought up whenever hydrogen is mentioned. Hydrogen is less safe than liquid fuel, but it is not less safe than natural gas or propane. Hydrogen has a higher flame propagation velocity than hydrocarbon gasses, but contains much less energy per unit volume than hydrocarbon gasses. A huge ...


18

The primary reason is availability -- the high pressure fuel pump is running whenever the engine is, while the airframe hydraulic systems may not be available in case of an accessory gearbox failure, hydraulic leak, or maintenance shutoff. Also, this keeps hydraulic lines from needing to be plumbed deep within the bowels of the engine -- this has benefits ...


18

It's pretty much to limit imbalance when parked on a slope, and if the tanks are full, stop fuel from the high side tank from forcing fuel out of the low side tank's vent or seeping out the fuel cap if it isn't completely fluid tight. On the '68 Cardinal I used to own, the vents went straight to the wing tip on each tank's side. If parked on a side slope ...


16

Ground effect plays very little here. When taking off and climbing you need to add kinetic energy and potential energy to the plane in terms of speed and height. Getting that energy requires burning fuel. When landing you want to get rid of that energy. Easiest way is to turn down the engine (or off when something breaks) and let drag slow you down and ...


16

A typical GA airplane will draw fuel from at or near the bottom of the tank. An aerobatic airplane will have a hose from the engine to the middle of the tank, then on the inside of the tank there will be another flexible hose with a weight on the end. This inside hose is called a "flop tube". When the plane is in upright flight, the "clunk weight" on the ...


15

Fuel shutoff valves are a hold over from the days of float style carburetors (and necessary on any float style carb system). With a float style carb when the fuel is on the bowl will fill up until the float floats up and shuts the flow off. Since gasoline becomes a vapor at ambient temperature the small pool in the carb will be constantly evaporating. As ...


14

The new insurer for the Cessna 210 I fly is only charging \$300 to add me to the policy—instead of $1,300 the old one wanted—so I’ve been reading the 210 manual for the first time in several years. I noticed that the Owner’s Manual doesn’t mention anything about leaning on the ground and gives advice about leaning in the air that has been superseded by newer ...


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