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87

Extremely safe. Firstly, your pilots will have access to much more detailed and real-time weather information than you can get. They want to get home safely as much as you do, and will not fly if it is not safe to do so. If the wind is coming from straight ahead, there is no maximum limit, which is good as aircraft takeoff and land into the wind whenever ...


75

Since it hit a bird, it was a bird strike. Nothing else matters for that classification. The puff of flame suggests there probably was a momentary compressor stall. That is the compressor was unable to maintain the pressure as the flow was disrupted by the bird, the flow through the engine slowed down for short while, some extra fuel accumulated in the ...


74

When I worked as a flight attendant back in the 80's we were told that water landings frequently resulted in very damaged trailing edges to the wings. Flaps and spoilers will most likely have been deployed prior to landing and the velocity of the water impacting these extended surfaces would tear them up badly, along with the hinges and fairings that ...


68

NASA has lots of cool aircraft. They get them sometimes when they get to the end of their life/retired, sometimes they are custom built trainers, and sometimes they are used to test research projects. You can find the full history of that particular 737 here NASA’s Boeing 737-100 Transport Systems Research Vehicle was the prototype 737, acquired by the ...


60

The main thing to avoid in aeroplane stability & control, is an aerodynamic nose up moment that is not commanded by the pilot. The uncommanded nose-up moment would not auto-stabilise, but rapidly get progressively larger with increasing angle of attack, and run away to a stalled aeroplane. During certification of a passenger aeroplane, many tests are ...


60

The pictures show water condensation on the wing upper surface due to very cold fuel in main tank number 2. The fuel is cold because the air temperature at cruise altitude is significantly colder than the air temperature encountered during the descent. The condensation appears to be oozing from the wing but it is in fact flowing slowly over the surface, ...


55

MCAS doesn't have its own on/off switch It is a fly-by-wire feature designed to account for a particular flight regime that would not (or was not expected to) be encountered very often in normal operations, and is intended to account for some of the aerodynamic effects of the LEAP-1B (CFM International) engine installation for this model. Its activation ...


53

The 737-800 is not grounded (and never has been). The aircraft type has an excellent safety record. Since 1997 over 5000 have been produced. The 737 MAX 8 is its successor. The aircraft is very similar to the 737-800. One of the differences is the placement (more forward and higher) of the slightly bigger engines. This changed the stability of the aircraft ...


46

It's the air inlet for the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Slide 18 here has an image labelled "APU Air Inlet door with Vortex Generator". The inset image on the slide looks almost exactly like your posted image. I found a much better image here, captioned "Boeing 737-800 with APU inlet". There is some discussion about why the 737 has vortex generators for ...


45

For one, the early 737s had a design flaw which allowed the rudder to reach a hard-over position, and get stuck there. Boeing initially dragged their feet in rectifying this, so it took a number of accidents before this design flaw was corrected. This is a major contributor to the high number of fatalities in the early operational years. To have a more ...


39

The engine in question is a CFM56 turbofan engine which is larger than the JT8D the plane was originally designed for and thus has less ground clearance. This meant that they needed to flatten the bottom by moving the accessory gearbox to the side from the bottom and shrinking the fan. To quote Wikipedia: In the early 1980s Boeing selected the CFM56-3 to ...


39

This is the forward Master Call Light Panel installed in the ceiling of the cabin. A second one is located aft. These panels exist on all large aircraft for the cabin crew members to be alerted without staying at their seats. The number and color of lights vary according to customer requested options for the cabin. Some lights may be duplicated to indicate ...


39

Short version: yes, the plane can take it The 737 — or any other plane — will not take off unless the wind is within safe limits for the aircraft type. Long version: your question almost answered itself Did you know that last year there was not even not one single airfare-paying passenger fatality? Keep this in mind for a while... Now, you came here ...


38

No it does not, it does not need one, there is a mechanical connection to the flight controls that can be used if all else fails. The B737 flight controls are hydraulically powered. There are three hydraulic systems: System A, System B, and Standby. Only one main system (A or B) is required for hydraulically flying the aircraft, during normal operation they ...


37

There are many factors that would increase the business cost for taking an operation across the Atlantic/borders: ETOPS Crew accommodation overseas Acquiring airport slots in Europe Aircraft cycles (two flights for one destination) Cruise speed (being 10-12% slower is huge over long distances) Geography, especially latitude. I will focus on the sixth point,...


37

It's a serious crime, but what that guy did, only affecting one system out of three, would be unlikely to cause a crash if the pilots were half way reasonably competent. The take-off would be rejected as soon as the blocked side's speed tape failed to "come alive", well below 80kt (the pilot not flying checks that both speed tapes start to move as the ...


34

With the gear handle in the UP position, the retraction side of the landing gear actuators remain pressurized. The gear will stay in the full up position, however they will not be hanging on the mechanical locks designed to hold them in the up position. They've simply hit the full up mechanical stop. When the handle is placed in the OFF position, hydraulic ...


33

According to BBC's description, he blocked one of the pitot tubes. (...) a piece of foam was found glued inside a navigation system part which stopped it from functioning. It was reportedly inside the tube leading from the outside of the plane to its air data module, a system that reports aircraft speed, pitch [sic] and other critical flight data. A ...


32

When UP or DOWN is selected, the hydraulics pressurize in the appropriate direction. Once the gear is up and the mechanical locks are keeping the gear locked in place, OFF can be selected to disconnect the hydraulic power.


32

They are the overwing exit markings. You can see them in full in the following photo. Boeing 737 Max overwing exits. By Oleg V. Belyakov - http://spotters.net.ua/file/?id=110706&size=large, CC BY-SA 3.0, Linkec This is because as already noted in another answer, B737 does not have self inflating slides for its overwing exits and as such, the passengers ...


30

Winglets are fixed to the ends of the aircraft. As can be seen below, the winglet has no movable parts and is fixed to the end of the wings. http://www.sae.org/dlymagazineimages/2861_2313_ACT.jpg Boeing 737 winglet; image from sae.org What you'd seen is an optical illusion. The port and starboard side winglets would not be much different, usually (except ...


30

It appears to depend on how much changed. You do have to have some training between models. The selling point was that an airline with 737 pilots could fly the MAX variant with minimal retraining "The airplane is configured to be very common with the [737 NG]," Wilson, who is now retired, said, "and so a pilot can walk into here and will find everything ...


29

Raw numbers like this are more-or-less useless. You would have to plot the accidents against the year to even begin to have something reasonable. You also need to remove non-airframe accidents like: under-full-control crashes like controlled flight into terrain (pilot screwups have nothing to do with the airframe, and account for a lot of accidents) weather-...


29

They are called vortex generators, and their function is to create a small vortex which re-energizes the boundary layer. Here is a better picture which also shows that their leading edge is swept like that of a delta wing: Vortex generators on a T-45 (picture source) In essence, they are small wings which each create their own delta wing vortex. This ...


28

That looks like Flaps 1, and that is not only normal and safe, it is very common on relatively long runways (7500' and longer). For slightly shorter runways, a Flaps 5 takeoff is often used, and for the shortest runways (less than 5500', roughly), even Flaps 15 or on some aircraft, Flaps 25. All of those are entirely safe options. As the runway gets ...


28

No, it is perfectly normal to operate without any fuel in the center tank. Until your fuel load is over about 17,000 lbs, the center tank should be empty. That’s enough for about 2 hours of flying, plus reserves. If your simulator requires fuel in the center tank in order to start the engines, it isn’t accurately replicating the real aircraft.


28

(airliners.net) Be sure to turn on the appropriate pumps on the lower-left of the overhead panel. The APU can start without them via suction. Otherwise, it's a simulator problem. Also see: Why are fuel tanks in the wings filled first, and why are they used last?


28

To reduce damage in case of a bird strike. The restriction is not only for the 737-100 and -200 models, the 737 NG QRH says: WINDOW HEAT OFF In flight: WINDOWS HEAT switch (affected window) ..... OFF Limit airspeed to 250 knots maximum below 10,000 feet. Pull both WINDSHIELD AIR controls. This vents conditioned air to the inside of ...


26

That's an air inlet -- technically a "Ram Air" inlet -- for the air conditioning packs. There is a "left" and "right" pack, which supply air to the forward and aft part of the aircraft respectively (although either pack can supply enough air to keep the aircraft pressurized to its max altitude). They use high temperature/high pressure bleed air from the ...


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