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105

Towing is quite feasible, and even landing while in tow is possible - I've done it myself in gliders. The hard part is catching up with the stricken plane. To stay with Keegan's Boeing 777: It most likely will travel at Mach 0.8 and somewhere between 30.000 and 39.000 ft when disaster strikes. Let's further assume that power fails instantly, so the aircraft,...


63

No, and this applies to any pilot, not just an airliner pilot. After the pilot has been cleared to land (or even if you're landing at your own discretion at an untowered airport), he can decide to go around instead of landing if he's dissatisfied with the approach for any reason. The pilot might need to abort the landing for reasons the tower can't possibly ...


56

I've had this happen a few times on aging C152's and in all cases I have been able to simply push it against the airflow enough to pull it closed. On a PA28 with the door the other side of the cabin from the pilot seat, this wouldnt be possible. Not that I have experienced it in a PA28, but I might ask a passenger to attempt the same (hard push followed by a ...


47

What's the procedure? The procedure is, be creative to save as many lives as possible! Really. The procedure is to determine a course of action which will likely result in the best outcome for everyone, utilizing all resources and given all constraints. Period. It is as simple as that. There are infinitely many scenarios, and one cannot be trained for ...


44

In theory, if the lone tower controller is incapacitated, the airport is no longer controlled and pilots should use the standard procedures for uncontrolled airports, i.e. making traffic calls on CTAF. In the KLAS case, the pilots had every reason to expect the tower to be open, and rather than getting no response, they were getting unintelligible gibberish....


43

It depends on the type of situation. If the aircraft is unable to land for some reason, we'll want to know the remaining fuel to get an idea of how long the aircraft can realistically stay airborne. For an aircraft coming in for an emergency landing - as you have already guessed - the reason we ask for remaining fuel is because the fire and rescue personel ...


41

If the plane is on final approach and the pilot flying loses his displays the co-pilot (who is also rated to fly the aircraft) may take over. Perhaps more importantly the system is built to avoid this. The "screens" you mention are independent and both (2 screens per side) are capable of displaying the primary instrumentation/information, a situation where ...


40

It is possible for the engine to not respond to shutdown sequence, so you'd have to get the passengers off before dealing with the rogue engine. In the Qantas Flight 32 one engine had an un-contained turbine failure in engine No. 2 leaving them unable to shutdown engine No. 1. This was due to a piece of debris severing all communication to the engine, ...


40

There is no automatic shutdown. However, shutting down the engines is part of the evacuation checklist done by the flight crew. It's happened before that the controls link was severed and an engine could not be shutdown, such as in Qantas Flight 32. Upon landing, the crew were unable to shut down the No. 1 engine, which had to be doused by emergency ...


39

The image looks like four engines running at the same cruise thrust. The wake vortex is blowing the exhaust of the inboard engines down and the exhaust of the outboard engines out and in the perspective of this image this makes the lower two streams look merged while the upper ones further apart. Close behind the engines it is clear there is four of them and ...


37

There is no standard because there's no standard emergency. The response to "Say fuel onboard" (or the way the question is phrased) depends on who cares most about the answer. Fuel Remaining (in minutes) This is how you report it when you declare a minimum fuel emergency, and it's most useful for approach and tower controllers to know exactly how long they ...


36

Do whatever it says in the POH for your aircraft. This is from the C172S POH, for example: Accidental opening of a cabin door in flight due to improper closing does not constitute a need to land the airplane. The best procedure is to set up the airplane in a trimmed condition at approximately 75 KIAS, momentarily shove the door outward slightly, and ...


36

The first thing you're going to want to do is get fresh air into the cabin, by ensuring the vents/windows are open. This will dilute the amount of CO in the cabin and stop your symptoms getting worse - allowing you to land as soon as practical. There is also some good information online which contains further advice: Turn the cabin heat fully off. ...


35

The pilot of an aircraft is responsible for the safety of the flight. If he wants to go around or cancel takeoff, he can and will just do so. The purpose of ATC is to provide a service to help the pilots, not to tell them how to do their job. More technically speaking, when a flight is cleared for an approach, they are also automatically cleared to fly the ...


30

As a tower controller, in case of an unexpected unusual situation for an aircraft on final approach, this will be my list of priorities: Clear the runway of other traffic Determine if fire and rescue services need to get involved (Call fire and rescue services) Call approach and ask them to stop inbound traffic. In case of other traffic on final behind the ...


28

What's the general protocol for cabin crew, when asked by passengers who notice potential issues like this and get curious? The flight crew and pilots are under no obligation to inform the passengers about non critical issues and broadly speaking it's often better to provide only needed information so as not cause some kind of panic. In the vast majority ...


27

I am picturing something like a 777 being towed due to a complete engine failure. Please correct me if you had something else in mind. This is unheard of, but it would be possible, and is a very interesting thought. The first thing that comes to mind is something like a C-17 being refueled by a KC-135 Of course, a loaded 777 will weigh more carrying ...


26

No, the captain will simply have the first officer land. The co-pilot normally lands half the flights anyway, one more isn't an issue. If the airport is restricted to captain only landings, dictated by airline policy, they should divert to a non-restricted airport. Pilots should not switch sides in flight because the sight picture is slightly different on ...


26

There's not much else they can do in a situation like this. ATC, in this case the tower controller is the only person(instance) that has a comprehensive enough view (both literally and metaphorically) of the situation to give orders, clearances etc. What the pilots can and will do in a case like this, is proceed according to their last clearance. If you are ...


25

Before we delve into this one. Let's be clear that it is much easier for us to sit at a computer with books in hand and review decisions made under urgent circumstances. Technically, the airport manager was correct here because per 14 CFR §91.126(b)(1): "Each pilot of an airplane must make all turns of that airplane to the left unless the airport ...


25

There's two schools of thought. First is the keep the engine on school because keeping the engine on: Gives you more control of the airplane Gives you the option to go around Keeps the procedure simple and allows the pilot to concentrate on a good touchdown Keeps the dynamics of the airplane predictable and familiar to the pilot The shutdown the engine ...


25

The pilot has 100% responsibility for how, where and when to fly/land. The movies make it seem like pilots are just mindless drones, under the control of ATC. In actual fact ATC are there as an aid to the pilot, helping stop big metal tubes from colliding with one another. This was borne out (to some extent) on US Airways 1549 where ATC were advising the ...


25

This aircraft does not have fuel dumping capability. In general, only large wide body airliners have fuel dumping capability. Aircraft can land overweight quite easily but getting stopped on the runway safely is the main problem. Even with fuel dumping, aircraft will often still plan to land overweight. The amount of fuel to be dumped would be planned to ...


23

If lower airspeed and the push/pull technique don't get the door closed, I have always had great success opening a window and trying again, especially in Cessnas (check your POH and observe max window open speeds). This helps equalize the pressure between inside and out and makes the door close much more easily. The windows are usually very easy to open ...


23

I'm basically going to echo what's already been said, but with a twist. Yes, of course you can keep talking to the people you're already talking to, on the frequency you're already on. If you're actually talking to someone already, that's probably your best bet, not least because they know you're there. In fact, especially if you're in controlled airspace, ...


22

You don't brace -- you're still operating the aircraft! The pilot seats have shoulder harnesses; in many cases you can lock them, plus they also have inertial reels that keep you from slamming forward at an impact. Additionally, the pilots can presumably see the moment of impact coming, and tense for exactly that moment in a way that passengers cannot.


21

(Source) That was the case on July 23, 1983 (but not quite). It was luck the manual gravity-extension didn't lock the nose gear in position. That has been attributed to the shortening of the landing roll/slide. Two factors helped avert a potential disaster: the failure of the front landing gear to lock into position during the gravity drop, and the ...


21

At the time of the imagery, it appears the airport was undergoing major renovation, now completed at least insofar as the runway is concerned. See iqaluit-airport-s-runway-gets-a-facelift-as-construction-completed. During the reconstruction they kept a minimal portion of the runway open for operations, enough to bring 757s in but not enough to get 767s in. ...


20

You keep it clean: adding flaps adds drag. You can see this in Section 3 of the Cessna POH, which includes a Maximum Glide (distance) diagram. In the C172S POH that I checked, it notes that maximum distance is achieved with: SPEED 68 KIAS PROPELLER WINDMILLING FLAPS UP ZERO WIND (A tailwind would extend your range, but only in one direction.) ...


20

No, there is no standard procedure for handling a scenario like the one you describe. It is up to the pilot in command, in cooperation with air traffic control, to decide what to do. There are generally very few specific procedured defined for handling emergency situations. Handling unusual situations is exactly why there are pilots and air traffic ...


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