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296

It's a false cockpit, a type of camouflage patented in 1980 by Keith Ferris, a US artist and camouflage designer. From some angles, it makes it difficult to determine the orientation of the aircraft. The Canadians were the first to apply it; pictured is a CF-18 Hornet with one: Notice how at a glance, it takes a second to realize the Hornet is inverted and ...


76

It's an emergency escape hatch. There are inertial reels in the cockpit ceiling adjacent to the hatch to allow the cockpit crew to exit the airplane. See this link for an account of their use escaping the aircraft during a hijacking. There were five reels in the 747-100/200 aircraft. The cockpit had five seats: pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer, and two ...


67

This is a Military Standard fuel cap, part number MS29525-1. Here is the DOD page for the products: MS29525-1. It is most likely from a military aircraft or some kind of private ex-military warbird. There really isn't much to say on it, other than it is used by the Air Force and Navy, as well as some British aircraft. It is a universal part used on many ...


58

Those are static wicks -- Basically these are little wires screwed to the airframe. Their purpose is to discharge the static electricity that an aircraft picks up moving through the air - especially in clouds. The static discharge tends to happen at "pointy" protrusions from the aircraft - if this happened through antennas it could cause radio and ...


58

That's called the step. Without it, you'd have to fight against the buoyancy of the rear end of the hull when you rotate for takeoff. However, a seaplane float or hull must be designed to permit the seaplane to be rotated or pitched up to increase the wing's angle of attack and gain the most lift for takeoffs and landings. Thus, the underside of the float ...


58

They are definitely not jet engines. They look more like electric motors or generators or blower units or something.


56

Also used by the South African Air Force on its Gripen fighter aircraft and, before that, its Cheetah (upgraded Mirage) fighter aircraft. The intention is to create momentary uncertainty as to which direction an aircraft may turn, both for air-to-air encounters against other aircraft and when doing low-level manoeuvring in the ground-attack role. An image ...


55

(airliners.net) Above I marked five similar plus signs on the 737 (there are more). Beneath the +'s are the contacts for the backlighting of each panel. If it acts up then pressing on the sign will ground/secure the connection and may solve the issue. The electroluminescent light-panels are flexible and the ride can be too bumpy sometimes. Better push the ...


51

It's an airspeed indicator for ultralights. The pitot inlet is at the bottom and the pitot air pushes a little red plastic disc up and down on a central rod, with a calibrated clearance between the edge of the disc and the walls of the tube. They are very sensitive and are good down to 10 MPH or less. You'll also see them on hang gliders. See here: ...


49

It's too big and too intact. In a turbofan engine, you see the fan upfront. The casing (nacelle) surrounding the engine would not survive. And the remaining core that runs the engine is much smaller compared to the fan and engine, in diameter and length, respectively. For comparison, this is the remaining core from the 737 Max crash in Ethiopia (lower-...


46

These are very large electric motors, used in HVAC plants or water distribution, probably. Or possibly main generators out of a diesel gen-set. They are very dense and tough by design, though certainly beat to snot; they may have been inside a building that collapsed. They are on the trailer together because they are going a scrapper who specializes in ...


44

The aircraft is the Boeing E-4B Advanced Airborne Command Post 'Nightwatch', which serves as the survivable mobile command post for the US National Command Authority. The aircraft are based on the same Boeing 747s as the VC-25s used by US President. There are four identical aircraft performing this function in the US. The "bulge" on the top is a radome ...


43

This is because those engines have turbocompressors which are used to supply cabin air. The engine bleed air drives the turbine of the turbocompressor, which in turn would drive a compressor which would pull in air from the atmosphere through the front hole, compress it, and send it down to the Environmental Control System for use as cabin air. The ...


43

It's a Boeing 314 flying boat. From the late 30s (look at the two rectangular windows behind the cockpit). The last dedicated navigators on long range flights had started to disappear by the late 60s in the airline business.


43

It is a fitting for a Hucks Starter. Photos from Vintage Wings Canada


42

That is the mounting point for night vision goggles. The following image shows a helmet with NVG mounted. Helmet mounted NVG; image from lemt.by The USAF has helmets with different mounting and some of the modern pilot helmets (like BAE Striker II, for example) have an integrated night vision device.


40

If there is a problem on-board and the crew is unsure about the condition of the aircraft, the triangle indicates what window should be used to inspect flaps, slats or engines or look out for icing. This saves important time in case of an emergency, as the crew doesn't has to search the right window to look out. For example if there is a failure of the ...


39

This is the forward Master Call Light Panel installed in the ceiling of the cabin. A second one is located aft. These panels exist on all large aircraft for the cabin crew members to be alerted without staying at their seats. The number and color of lights vary according to customer requested options for the cabin. Some lights may be duplicated to indicate ...


39

It is just a design feature, and serves no technical purpose, beyond filtering some light and providing a waterfall feature. Safdie designed the roof of the rotunda as an inverted dome, an asymmetric dish floating above the piazza that lets sunlight in and filters the daylight with a special white fabric ceiling. source: https://www.bdcnetwork.com/ready-...


38

These are secondary intake doors which allow more air to reach the engines. They are opened by the engine control computer when the main intakes are not providing enough air for the power setting of the engine. In order to minimize radar cross section, the engines of the B-2 are buried in the wings and the intake needs to be curved. Also, and for the same ...


38

They are the roots of the variable stator vanes that control the direction of the airstream as it enters each compressor stage to manage and optimize the angle of attack of the compressor blades in each stage. The vanes are connected to the ring shaped gang bar and somewhere around the circumference there is an hydraulic actuator, or a series of them, that ...


36

Wikipedia cites the biological concept of automimicry, or intraspecific mimicry, where a species develops a part of the body which appears similar to another part, e.g. a tail appearing like a head, so that predators become confused as to the orientation or direction of movement of their prey. As per egid's answer, this technological form of automimicry ...


35

Those are Elevator shaft motors, they're wound for high starting torque, not like most pump motors. Here is one of the motors from 2 other angles. It's on exhibit at the 9/11 World Trade Center Memorial & Museum. Photo 1 (Source "More Than Route 66" blog): Next to the radio tower was an elevator shaft motor also recovered from the rubble. The ...


33

(airliners.net) Ejector on the Rolls-Royce Conway of a DC-8. It's called an ejector. Introduced in c. 1958 by Douglas for their DC-8, it is extended during takeoff and landing, and stowed during the flight because it increases the drag at high-speed flight. In the extended position it acts as a noise suppressor, and it also reclaims thrust that has been ...


32

They are the overwing exit markings. You can see them in full in the following photo. Boeing 737 Max overwing exits. By Oleg V. Belyakov - http://spotters.net.ua/file/?id=110706&size=large, CC BY-SA 3.0, Linkec This is because as already noted in another answer, B737 does not have self inflating slides for its overwing exits and as such, the passengers ...


32

According to the Airliners.net forum, they are fairings that cover hardpoints used for attaching outsize loads. Outsize loads that cannot fit into the capacious cabin (including Buran and Energiya components) are carried 'piggyback', the load supported on two main attachments above the center section. These supports and other smaller ones along the ...


29

It is a temperature probe for the preconditioned air (PC air) unit. Bleed air is required in order to operate the air conditioning packs on an aircraft*. Thus, either an engine or the auxiliary power unit (APU) must remain running, burning jet fuel. PC air pumps heated or cooled air into the aircraft and allows the pilot to shut down the engines and APU ...


28

It's called a hull step. Below is with and without: It reduces water drag. As the plane gains speed and the aft body is lifted, only the forward hull will be in contact with the water. Source: Laté 631 Replica - Chapter 3 - Hydrodynamics


27

You're right. It's the ECM/EW antenna/equipment (fairing) in all the aircrafts except Typhoon. This photo shows the details of EW/ECM suite in Gripen. Source: www.w54.biz In Typhoon, it is the engine bleed air heat exchanger. The part is in detail here. Source: b-domke.de


27

Originally there was no instrument at this place, except for UE series with an electrically driven artificial horizon, where there was a fast erect pushbutton/indicator for the copilot gyro. According to Wikipedia, UD series is for the military model and UE series is for 1900D, so I assume UC series is for 1900C model. Instrument panel for series UA/UB/UC: ...


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