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31 votes
Accepted

Do pilots reject takeoff if aircraft doors are not properly locked down?

The crew has already secured the door just before leaving the gate, cross-checked them and the pilots saw the sensors indicate closed. So if the warning goes off during take-off roll, it is not ...
Jan Hudec's user avatar
  • 56.3k
23 votes

When, if any case, can it be considered justifiable to reject a takeoff after V1 speed, if the aircraft is incapable of taking off?

If the aircraft is truly incapable of taking off -- the locked controls case, let's say -- then the only choice involved is along the lines of, go off the end of the runway really really fast (you ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
23 votes

What are the effects of a rejected takeoff?

If an airplane is close to V1, the brakes - which have to absorb kinetic energy and dissipate heat - can get hot to the point where the tires automatically deflate, to prevent them from exploding. For ...
Wasserwaage's user avatar
  • 1,704
21 votes
Accepted

What is the procedure for a rejected Jet/Rocket Assisted Takeoff (J/RATO)?

JATO (more correctly: RATO) typically uses simple solid-fuel rockets for their ease of maintenance, simple construction, long-term storability, robustness, and reliability. However, a simple solid-...
Jörg W Mittag's user avatar
18 votes

Do pilots reject takeoff if aircraft doors are not properly locked down?

Yes if prior to V1 (takeoff decision speed). On most modern airliners there are proximity sensors that monitor the latching system at various points, that will produce various warning or advisory ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
17 votes

What are the effects of a rejected takeoff?

The outcome depends on the speed, aircraft, weight, and other factors. If the takeoff is aborted at low speed (maybe up to 30-40kts), there may be no issues. The pilot would be able to vacate the ...
fooot's user avatar
  • 73.4k
12 votes

What should the pilots do when fire is detected during the takeoff roll at high speed?

Before starting the takeoff, the pilots will have calculated at least 3 V speeds: V1, VR and V2. The important one for your question is V1, the takeoff decision speed. This is the critical speed that ...
Bianfable's user avatar
  • 56.5k
10 votes
Accepted

How does the B737's 'throttle offline' setting work?

That article is about somebody's simulation. In the real aircraft, the pilots can always override the A/T and can always turn it off entirely. The A/T will push the throttles toward the target ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
8 votes

Why would pilots "call the company" after an aborted takeoff?

While many of the answers shared "may" be partially correct, there is a compliance issue that requires the "call company" to occur. The Dispatch Release (the document that permits the flight to be ...
Kirk Tuttle's user avatar
8 votes

Why can’t takeoff rejection be automated?

What about a deer on the runway? What about a BANG coming from the back somewhere? What about a bird strike? What about some indistinct object down the way that looks like it could be an airplane ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
7 votes
Accepted

Why don’t aircraft undergo contaminated-runway landing-distance and rejected-takeoff certification testing?

Baseline performance data was developed some years ago by an FAA test program called the Joint Winter Runway Friction Program to develop mathematical models of the effects of the different types of ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
6 votes
Accepted

Can water-cooled brakes be used for takeoff aborts?

This solves the problem of rejected takeoff, which is certainly a major factor in brake design. However, dumping the water after takeoff means that benefit is unavailable for landing. Events such as ...
fooot's user avatar
  • 73.4k
6 votes
Accepted

What would happen if a takeoff is not rejected following an elevator malfunction?

There are a number of scenarios that I can see happening, most of which depend on the aerodynamics specific to the aircraft. Scenario 1: Nose Down Force > Up Force I believe this to be exactly what ...
Ron Beyer's user avatar
  • 36.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Why don't commercial aircraft have drag chutes for aborted takeoffs?

The answer to this is much the same as they answer to any "Why don't airliners have [XYZ safety equipment]?"; the answer is generally along the lines of questioning whether the occurrence of such ...
Jamiec's user avatar
  • 33.7k
5 votes

How to keep an aircraft stationary with an inoperative parking brake?

Keep pushing hard on the wheel brakes... And hope those do work, obviously. If there's soggy ground next to the runway, let the aircraft roll onto that and the wheels should bog down into the mud. ...
jwenting's user avatar
  • 16.1k
4 votes

Can water-cooled brakes be used for takeoff aborts?

I'm sure it could be used, the question is what problem it would solve that would make it worth doing. Dumping water for each take-off means more stuff that could break on the aircraft itself, and ...
bjelleklang's user avatar
  • 4,165
4 votes

Why are landing-distance and rejected-takeoff certification tests performed without thrust reversers?

Would it be better to have numbers with thrust reversers and then forget to deploy them (or failed reversers) or to have numbers without reversers and use them on landing? The first case will cause ...
wbeard52's user avatar
  • 12.7k
3 votes

Why don't commercial aircraft have drag chutes for aborted takeoffs?

An A380 at maximum load weighs 575 tonnes. That would need an enormous parachute and lots of difficult engineering. And the main difficulty is that you're talking about adding a system that's ...
David Richerby's user avatar
3 votes

What is the procedure for a rejected Jet/Rocket Assisted Takeoff (J/RATO)?

Once the rockets are ignited, it is basically too late to abort the takeoff, so the decision would have to be made before doing that. This is one reason why RATO is not used today as much as it used ...
J. Southworth's user avatar
2 votes

Why would pilots "call the company" after an aborted takeoff?

Almost certainly refers to calling station ops in order to get a gate. After a rejected takeoff, even at fairly low speed, it's common to need to let the brakes cool, and if they aren't so hot as to ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
2 votes

What would happen if both engines of a twinjet cut out at or immediately after V1?

Basically, yes. You will get on the brakes and hope for the best. If the runway is 10000 ft and your accelerate stop distance at max thrust is 7000, no problem. If the runway is marginal, or you are ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
2 votes

What is the rejected takeoff procedure for a blown tire?

With smaller planes, if you blow a tire on takeoff and have enough runway left to abort, then you should do so. Staying on the ground can be a much better option than a go-around and landing with a ...
Aaron Holmes's user avatar
  • 4,847
1 vote

Can water-cooled brakes be used for takeoff aborts?

Of course, they could technically use water-cooled brakes, but there are downsides. For example, airports don't want water spilt all over the ground just because one airplane had some hot brakes. It's ...
Air Canada 001's user avatar
1 vote

What are the effects of a rejected takeoff?

Depends upon the reasons for aborting the takeoff, how fast the aircraft is moving relative to V1, the amount of runway available to the aircraft, the response time of the flight crew to intervene and ...
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
  • 74.1k

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