40

Really there's nothing you should do in cases like these. Flightradar24, FlightAware, and similar services should not be used for flight safety purposes, and most of them specifically state so in their terms of service (such as sections 12 and 14 of Flightradar24's terms and conditions). Their sources may go down for whatever reason -- that does not mean ...


33

They have Mode-S transponders / ADS-B transmitters specifically for vehicles such a the ERA SQUID, Thales MOSQUITO or Saab Sensis VeeLoPDF. Typically vehicles that operate on taxiways and runways are equipped with such transponders, which ensures the vehicles can be tracked by the Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). Vehicles ...


30

FR24 relies for most of the tracks on ADS-B data. Part of the ADS-B transmissions is the position. There are three causes of the behaviour that you observe: 1). Aircraft landing next to the runway The position source onboard the aircraft is not always GPS. Mainly older aircraft (e.g. Fokker 100) have their Inertial Navigation System (INS) coupled to the ...


19

A recent article in Aviation Week showed a modified Bombardier Global 6000 with a "canoe" type fairing underneath the fuselage which typically houses a variety of radar or electronic intelligence (ELINT) equipment (link (free registration req'd) with pic) (alternate). The UK's RAF flies the Sentinel aircraft which is based on a prior Bombardier model, the ...


14

Not to take away from already great answer provided. In my experience the jumping behavior you are describing in Flightradar24 is due to MLAT triangulation that is used to establish approximate location rather than absolute (using GPS). Older planes transmit a SUBSET of ads-b data, which does not include aircraft location. So FR24 knows that there is an ...


13

My theory here is that this was a flight check of the NDB at Jalalabad, but I could very well be wrong. Land-based navigation aids (such as VORs, DMEs, ILSes, and NDBs) can fail, and not always in a "no signal" way -- some failures are more subtle, but can cause the NAVAID to put out dangerously wrong information. Hence, on a periodic basis or after ...


13

Nothing you should do. Flight Radar 24 does not have coverage down to ground level in all areas. ATC has better surveillance and will be aware of the aircraft. Probably it's just in a fast descent, the Citation II / Bravo is quite a nice toy.


13

That flight pattern is almost certainly aerial surveying / mapping work and it's quite common all over the world. Companies like Google, Bing, etc pay for low to medium altitude photography and surveying of areas.


12

FlightRadar and similar websites use several sources for aircraft detection, most commonly they use ADS-B. Not all General Aviation aircraft, to which helicopters would count normally, are equipped with transponders that are capable of emitting ADS-B data, so they would not show via regular means on FlightRadar. The primary technology that Flightradar24 ...


11

@mins answer contains good information, however the conclusion that the mistake is in the Flightradar 24 database is not correct. It is not Flightradar 24 that has a database error: 30040D IS I-PTFT it is NOT I-MOFI F2TH I-MOFI is miscoded on one box and using 30040D incorrectly. I-MOFI is 30047D please change it back! Why was it changed in the DB ...


11

No, that has not been faked. Flightradar is updated with a low frequency (from that screenshot I'd estimate once per 10 seconds, maybe more). This is done to reduce the computational demands on both the service that sends the radar info to Flightradar, and on the Flightradar servers. Each dot in the track is one position update, and the website software ...


10

While Him's answer is correct, part of the reason that there aren't many airways over central China is just that there's rarely a reason to fly there. Where possible, aircraft prefer to take paths along great arcs, which are the shortest distance between two points on the surface of a sphere (such as Earth.) In short, there simply aren't many common air ...


9

Based on this discussion at FR24, mode S transponder addresses 0x30047D and 0x30040D were not associated with the correct airframes (as @Ralph early suggested). 30040D IS I-PTFT it is NOT I-MOFI F2TH I-MOFI is miscoded on one box and using 30040D incorrectly. I-MOFI is 30047D please change it back! Why was it changed in the DB when I-MOFI was correct ...


8

Because there is only 1 airway (B345) in Tibet. Source: Chinese AIP - 15 Jan 2019 China (PRC) creates 2 sets of Aeronautical Charts, AIP and NAIP. AIP is aeronautical charts only listing airways for International flight. It is open for public and foreign organisations. NAIP is a confidential and more accurate aeronautical charts listing airways for both ...


8

On this question it is mentioned that ground support vehicles are equipped with ground transponders that work with the airport ground radar. I doubt they have ADS-B. They are most likely getting a feed from the ground radar system. In this thread on the Flightradar24 forum they discuss what types of ground systems are compatible with the FR24 recievers. One ...


8

From the Flighradar How it works page: Flightradar24 relies on volunteers around the world for the majority of our coverage Note it implies: There are people willing to contribute These people can afford to buy receptors, gather the data and upload it to Flightradar About point 1. In case of China how much people are willing to contribute? How many ...


6

Your observation is somewhat correct. Plenty of flights land at hundreds of Chinese airports every day. The main reason why it always seems so empty on FR24 (technological issues aside addressed by Jean), is that 80% of China's airspace is open only to the military. Civillian flights are restricted to narrow corridors, adding many miles onto a flight, while ...


5

Sometimes, prevailing winds will account for the difference -- flights going west to east in the US will generally be scheduled for less time than flights going the opposite direction. The other major factor that can play is in taxi times. If the delays waiting to get in to a gate matched the times waiting to depart at each airport, these delays would ...


5

This is a classic example of fallback to INS. Most of the track data is coming from GPS. For some reason the GPS signal is lost momentarily causing a fall back to INS. The INS is offset by about 1km to the Northeast, which appears as a jump. Next position report is from the GPS again, in line with the original track. This happens several times. In the ...


4

With the way in which it suddenly switched back and forth it appears to be either a software glitch or bad data from one of the feeders. All aircraft displayed in yellow on FlightRadar24 are detected by volunteers with their own ADS-B receivers, of varying quality in hardware, software and range. When aircraft reach the very edge of someone's receiver range ...


4

There are a few consumer-facing easy-to-obtain devices that you could use for this, although they don't quite transmit in real-time (they'll transmit updates down to every 2 minutes). Spot and inReach are aimed at more casual users, and Spidertracks offers real-time tracking that might be considered targeting more of the commercial or "prosumer" market, but ...


3

I don't know where to find flight plans, but according to Wikipedia, the aircraft is a Boeing 747SP with registration NASA747. "747SP" set as aircraft type filter in flightradar24 was enough to find SOPHIA right now :


3

I use my Android cell-phone freeware app called Oruxmaps. It records a very detailed and correct copy of your real-time track updated many times per second. with only one drawback and that is altitude could be off by about a hundred feet. it is also a surprisingly versatile navigation and moving-map app which allows you to use any set of charts or ...


3

If you have the call sign, or Air Carrier flight number, you can track flights with http://flightaware.com. Air Carriers are required to file IFR flight plans so the destination is in the system and trackable. Part 91 (general aviation) and Part 135 (non-scheduled for hire) IFR flights also file a flight plan and their origin and destination are trackable. ...


2

Re: INS - Since there are no ground based radio transmission navigation stations in the ocean (VOR's or ADF's), the INS (inertial navigation system) was designed to help jets navigate safely over the ocean (before GPS). INS uses a series of gyroscopes and accelerometers to measure how far a plane has traveled from a specific point. With multiple ...


2

There is another possible but far less likely answer. If an aircraft is equipped to detect radiological signatures, the baseline data collection patterns look like this. So what does that mean? We live in a world which nuclear technology is used for many purposes, and is probably more prevalent than most people realize. Additionally, there are many sources ...


2

https://www.flightradar24.com/how-it-works - taken from the FR24 website. They use ADS-B - hence the reason the majority of General Aviation stuff doesn't show (unless it has a mode S transponder).


2

Flightradar24 gets all this data from thousands of ADS-B receivers that they have all over the world. Rural areas in China (Middle and western parts) don't have these receivers and hence not much data is shown there. The kit they provide is free or charge and all they require from the recipient is to have a stable internet connection and power. ...


1

Yes, a pilot can change this in-flight, just as they would have entered the data when on the ground before the flight. On the A320, this is done from the FMGS (Flight Management and Guidance System). To do this, the pilot presses the DATA key on the MDCU (Multipurpose Display and Control Unit) keyboard. This brings up the following display: And then ...


1

It may be possible to use almost any Android mobile phone with GPS tracker app, somewhat like this (many others exist). Unfortunately the solution with mobile phones alone only works within the reach of cell towers, while otherwise it is both very simple and convenient. If you have radio stations on these planes, it is possible to develop custom software ...


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