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42

Though routing this far north seems to make the flight about 200 miles longer, flight duration doesn't exactly correlate to route length. For a flight this long, wind plays a large role. Take a look at the image below of the current wind forecast from ADDS, with the two flight paths in blue. You can see if they took the southern route over Mexico they would ...


42

I can't be completely sure but the most likely reason is a planned strike by ATC in south-east France. It was planned from the 30th of June to the 1st or 2nd (depending on the source) of July, meaning that ATC services would be unavailable or at least seriously reduced in that area, presumably with knock-on effects in other parts of the country. Some ...


23

I don't think they are specifically avoiding Shanwick Oceanic airspace. The reason seems to be related to the airways in the Scottish airspace. In general, you have to file a route using airways when operating in this airspace and there simply isn't one available that provides a more direct route. I recreated what looks like the route you show on skyvector....


22

The diversion was roughly 3 hours into the flight (based on FlightAware), at about 0000 UTC (the 13th). At "12 MAR 22:50", i.e. about an hour before, the US issued the following NOTAM (notice to airmen): Those persons described in paragraph a (applicability) below are prohibited from operating in the Baghdad flight information region (FIR) (ORBB) at all ...


19

These "direct" flights are actually not unusual, at least in the US. I was surprised by this discovery based on the routes I personally tend to fly, but fortunately we have the Bureau of Transportation Statistics to provide objective information. Using the July 2019 data for all major carriers, I identified direct flights by counting multiples of ...


13

These are known as “direct” flights. They aren’t popular because each stop adds an hour or more to the travel time for through passengers, so they are significantly slower than non-stop flights yet little better than a connection. This actually used to be the norm, but in the last few decades most larger airlines have moved to a “hub and spoke” model with ...


8

One of the benefits of having a stop halfway is that the aircraft can refuel. It therefor doesn't have to carry the fuel for the second half of the flight during the first half, which saves fuel. The uplift of fuel costs approximately 4% of its weight per hour of flight. That means the fuel you consume in the 4th hour of flight has burned approximately ...


6

There are lots of reasons flights may not take a direct route, some are but not limited to: It's just the route ATC assigned (for whatever reason they see fit) There is an active military operations area or live firing area they are avoiding, these are not always "active" and may be avoided only sometimes. Some kind of natural event on the ground, wildfire,...


6

The tropopause is in the low to mid 30s in the mid-north latitudes that the NATs reside (and is in the 20s in the arctic in winter) so an airliner crossing on a NAT at 55 DegN at FL370 will be well into in the stratosphere. Concorde didn't use the NATs simply because the NATs top out at FL410. And in any case, the NATs are a large band of parallel tracks ...


6

Yes, such arrangements are not uncommon in routes served by commuter airlines and smaller regional carriers. At a stop, the "through" passengers remain seated while others deplane and new passengers enter.


5

Iceland is a perfect transatlantic hub. Most importantly, it makes single connection flights efficient between nearly all European and North American cities. Fuel and equipment advantages have already been mentioned. Look at all the city pairs, not just LHR-NYC, and you'll see that it's better as a hub than London, New York or any other city located on the ...


4

According to the pattern and altitude, this aircraft is probably doing aerial photography or 3D mapping (or both !) for services like Google Maps or Apple Plans. The Partenavia P-68 Observer is actually made for this kind of missions. According to this link, the Italian State Police uses it too. Since it's happening over Rome, it could be on an ...


4

It is part of a larger effort to boost Icelandic Tourism and has more to do with the economic condition of Iceland (of which tourism makes up 42% of their economy) than aviation for the most part. Iceland is a nation that does not have a huge amount of exports and relies heavily on tourism. Budget Icelandic airlines have been operating with Keflavik layovers ...


4

As others have pointed out, “direct“ flights do exist. The airline will have the same plane travel from one city to another with a stop or two along the way. On those flights some passengers will disembark at the stop as that is their destination. Other passengers will get on at the stop to go on to the other destination. Flying out of Love Field, this ...


3

That's just because of your city-pairs. What you're really saying is "Everytime I fly, I must go to an intermediate "hub" airport and change planes". That's not true for everyone, it's just (all due respect) true for you, because of the airlines and city-pairs that you do fly. It's actually perfectly common for an airline to have a "...


3

why are they so unusual? You could turn the question around and ask why bus and train companies run sectors where the vehicle is mostly empty and making a loss. Often it's because the city requires a minimum level of service for remote areas as part of the franchise. Also, it's cheap and easy for a bus or train to stop and change passengers, but an airline ...


3

"mins" linked to a set of rules at https://www.fai.org/sites/default/files/documents/sc_section_2_2013.pdf , I will try to interpret these in light of your question. I do not take any position on whether those are the official rules and I do not gaurantee my interpretation is correct. I have not read the entire document, just the parts that seemed relavent ...


3

Not having been there I can't tell for sure, but I would guess congestion. For safety reasons, the number of flights handled by one controller, and thus flying through their sector, in an hour is limited (to 35 IIRC). If there are more flight plans filed though it than the capacity, the flow management, handled in Europe by the Network Manager Operations ...


3

Do high flying jets have to use the NAT, and if so, why? They do not need to use the tracks when above the HLA (High Level Airspace), which is FL 285 to 420 (inclusive), but they need to be aware of the NAT procedures and have the current tracks. The why is in case they need to fly lower, say due to a loss of an engine. This is highlighted in ICAO Doc 007 (...


2

In both examples, the aircraft was crossing the direct path between origin and destination, sometimes even flying perpendicular to the direct line. It would take more than one obstacle (like severe weather) to explain these patterns. It is very likely that the pilots were deliberately delaying their arrival with respect to traffic congestion at the ...


2

In addition to the other reasons, it might simply be a matter of avoiding ATC charges. ATC charges by the mile multiplied by a factor for the size of the plane. However out in the Bay of Biscay ATC is pretty much free. See this article on the BBC for more details. Here is a table comparing the costs.


2

MIAT used to regularly fly from Berlin to Ulaanbaatar with a stop in Moscow. All of the passengers had to get off (and on again) in Moscow, although the plane and quite probably the crew would stay the same.


2

Sure. Flew Amsterdam-Dubai-Jakarta a few years ago that was just that, just the people needing to get off in Dubai did so. Same with a flight a long time ago Amsterdam-Bonaire-Curacao. Fuel stop in combination with letting some passengers on and off.


2

Southwest Airlines in the US does it all the time. Here's a flight from Houston, TX to New York, NY that has a stop in Atlanta, but still only a 5 hr flight end to end. Note the "1 STOP - no plane change" here on the flight listing on their website: And checking on the actual flight tracking shows the stop in Atlanta, but both legs are the same ...


2

It's also common in areas with islands. Many flights into Cape Verde islands hop one or more islands along the way in or out. Apparently it's lucrative enough to hit the airports in the region instead of having seperate flights.


1

Most of the answers focus on the US, but there are lots of such flights on international routes, at the very least on the Europe-Australia flights operated by European or Australian airlines, most of which have a stop somewhere in South-East Asia (Singapore, Bangkok...). Those flights are long enough that all passengers actually deplane before re-boarding (...


1

This is basically a milk run flight. I'm aware of two: Alaska Airlines runs one in Southeast Alaska from Seattle to Anchorage, and United runs one in the Pacific, from Honolulu to Guam. I've been on the Southeast Alaska one—if you're a through passenger, you don't really have time to get off the plane and use the airport facilities. https://simpleflying.com/...


1

There are various intercontinental, some as extra stop, and some as "triangle flights". E.g. Air Canada going from Canada, to Argentina and then Chile and then to Canada (or the contrary). If you need to go to Chile, you have a stop in Argentina, where there is change of people. But if you stopped in Argentina, at flight back, you will stop in ...


1

Widerøe definitely do this in the north of Norway. You can read about one traveller's experience of the Tromsø-Hasvik-Hammerfest-Honningsvåg-Mehamn-Vadsø-Kirkenes "milk run" here: https://simpleflying.com/flight-review-wideroes-explore-norway-pass-land-of-the-midnight-sun/ Here in Finland, I know that (pre-Covid, anyway) one of the Helsinki-Kemi ...


1

It lets an airline offer transatlantic service using aircraft that can't make the non stop trip, and/or don't meet the navigation requirements to fly the North Atlantic Track system.


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