56

Private business jets have a few requirements: Operational costs must be within budget. The concorde is pretty expensive to run as demonstrated by the high ticketprices you had to pay for a trip on one of them. Fuel is only part of that costs; maintenance is a pretty big part of that as well. Be able to land and take off close to where the CEO has his ...


53

Why was this cockpit much more complex than any other modern day aircraft Firstly, as others have noted, you imply Concorde was modern when you compare it with "other modern" aircraft. OK, it was a "jet-age" aircraft, but it wasn't a 21st Century design. it was designed before "glass cockpits" were possible, in the 1960s. There were no real multifunctional ...


47

The simple answer is that the Concorde had no single assigned altitude, it was allowed to climb freely above ~FL450; this is discussed in depth in episode 166 – Flying the Concorde (worth the listen as it answers just about every Concorde question!). As @pilothead alludes to in their answer it climbed as it burned fuel but the aircraft never actually ...


44

The main purpose of the wing fence is to prevent the boundary layer thickening in the wing due to the spanwise flow observed in swept wing, as can be seen below. Image from fuckyeahfluiddynamics.tumblr.com This is the reason for having wing fence in aircraft such as Mig-25- to avert stall and improve stability. In case of highly swept wing like the ...


43

There is a discussion on it here that's worth reading but in short the requirements were just different. A few of the key points, The black color on the SR-71 offered some night camouflage in addition to its heat dissipation The Concorde had an Aluminium airframe while the SR-71 had a primarily titanium airframe which could lead to different coating types. ...


39

While it was never explicitly sold as such (although BAE would have happily delivered it as such) it was operated in such a manner on many occasions. As detailed by this former pilot of the Concorde, the plane regularly flew as a charter with small passenger loads of VIPs often. So even though no one ever owned it specifically for private business it served ...


38

Why no flaps? Flaps change the pitching moment of a wing. After all, they add lift over the full chord, so the sum of the increased lift attacks at about mid-chord, which is a quarter chord aft of the regular lift. If there is no separate tail surface to compensate for the pitching moment caused by that extra lift, the aircraft will quickly pitch nose-down ...


29

As others already said, the keyword in your post is "modern" and Concorde is not one. You compare dissimilar things. Try comparing with something similar, a Boeing 747-200 cockpit for example: Copyright owner: Achim Pfennig Now compare the pictures. You will notice the same level of complexity in the cockpits. Sure there will be differences if you make an ...


27

The Concorde makes use of vortex lift (link). While one of the reasons for applying wing fences is to prevent air from flowing sideways, they are also able to create vortices (R. Whitford, Design for Air Combat, 1987), though this only applies to wing fences that don't extend over the entire wing. The need for vortex generators can be overcome if the wing ...


25

Actually, the Boeing design for the SST (Super Sonic Transport), the Boeing 2707 had a swing wing (swing wing was the hot thing during that time). It is instructive to look at what happened to that design. Image from up-ship.com The 2707 concept was a larger aircraft, with a 174' wingspan for TO/landing and low speed regime (In comparison, Concorde had a ...


24

Concorde had a 10,000fpm climb and a max altitude of 60,000ft, so time to climb was not a problem. It had an optimum cruise altitude that varied with weight, so as it burned fuel it climbed higher to stay on the optimum. There were no other aircraft operating at those altitudes, so it would get clearances to climb 15,000ft at a time and would cruise climb ...


23

Yes, a sonic boom produced at 60,000' can be heard on the ground. First of all, a sonic boom consist in a steep increase of air pressure, followed by a slow, linear decrease below the nominal ambient pressure, and again a steep increase back to the nominal pressure. It is therefore called N-shaped wave or just N-wave. Here is a graph with several sonic ...


23

You compare SFCs at different speeds. That is like comparing payloads for differently sized aircraft. SFC goes up with speed and, therefore, must be compared at the same speed. The work performed by an engine is thrust times distance, and higher speed means that the same thrust will perform more work per unit of time when the engine moves faster. The moving ...


22

The Concorde doesn't need reheat to cruise supersonically, just to get there (the range would be pretty short if it did). If it loses an engine it's not going to put the other 3 into reheat to hold altitude and speed (fuel burn) and it will do what just about all airliners have to do when at they lose an engine, descend to whatever its engine-out service ...


21

Why was this cockpit much more complex than any other modern day aircraft or a fighter jet. It looks to have much more buttons and controls, and very small(interesting) screens The cockpit is much more complex than any other modern day aircraft or a fighter jet because it is an Analogue cockpit. Concorde was designed in the 60's and at that point of time ...


18

Concorde's average skin temperature was 92°C (365K). Calculating the black body radiation using the Stefan Boltzmann law we get 1006W/m². This the maximum heat flux possible with perfect radiation, and very similar to the heat flux of solar radiation, which is also about 1kW/m² at the earth's surface in the absence of clouds (and a bit higher at Concorde's ...


18

The coffin corner is the altitude where your maximum speed (limited by high speed buffetting) is equal to your minimum speed (limited by low speed buffetting / onset to stall). The Concorde, when cruising at Mach 1, is not in the coffin corner, regardless of its engines health. Both the upper speed boundary and the lower speed boundary* of the flight ...


16

Bear in mind that these tests weren't to prove the safety of the aircraft per se, just to show that it would work as an airliner. It had to be loaded up with an appropriate complement of passengers and luggage to prove this. However proving flights may not generate revenue from passengers - they are either selected through an application process or chosen ...


15

Ultimately the cost of flying the aircraft was more than the revenue that it generated. The Concorde began a steady decline to retirement after the firey crash of Air France Flight 4590 which killed 113 people, and again suffered setback after September 11th, 2001. Even with the best safety record in airline history, the crash combined with the terrorist ...


15

(Source: concordesst.com) It does have elevators in the form of elevons at the trailing edge. A delta is effectively a tailless flying wing with a really long chord. Like any flying wing, pitch stability is achieved by down force generated at the local trailing edge by a control surface that does the same job as a regular elevator/stab, by applying down ...


13

Unfortunately, there is no hard data available (at least in open literature) to back up these claims. One for the claim may be due to the fact that the Tu-144 was designed to fly higher than Concorde as its primary flight path was over land rather than water. Because of this, the L/D ratio of the Tu-144 was higher than that of Concorde (7 vs 8 in Tu-144D). ...


13

There is no "horizontal stabilizer" on the Concorde like other commercial aircraft, the wing performs that duty because it is a delta-wing. The elevators for the Concorde are combined with the ailerons into something called "elevons" which perform both functions (Think stereotype paper airplane). Note: Elevators and Horizontal stabilizers are not the same ...


12

1) Though already mentioned that this might be too broad, I would dare to guess a properly fitted camera could do the trick. But I doubt that this would be effective considering the technology of the era that Concorde was developed. 2) Concorde due to its design for supersonic speeds, it was generating too little lift at low speeds (like those needed for ...


12

Yes. The extra height was necessary in order to reach lower pressure air, and thereby reduce drag, and heating of the airframe from supersonic compression of the air. Concorde's windows were extra small, so that if a window did blow out, the air compression system could actively compensate by pumping air in faster than it could escape, until the pilot ...


12

Concorde went supersonic during its climb phase to the cruising altitude. The altitude at which the Concorde can go supersonic was limited by the regulations. For example, the aircraft was only allowed to go at 400 knots during the climb phase between 6,000 and 32,000 ft; also, the aircraft was allowed to go supersonic only after it has crossed the ...


12

The Concorde was first used for observing solar eclipse in 1973. The aircraft used was Concorde 001, piloted by André Turcat with a scientific team of 8 people from US, UK and France. The main reason for using Concorde was that the eclipse can be observed above the clouds for far longer than on ground by literally 'chasing the moon'. Multiple instruments ...


11

The Concorde cruised at 1350mph (~Mach 2.05 at 55,000Ft.) Concorde’s fastest transatlantic crossing was on 7 February 1996 when it completed the New York to London flight in 2 hours 52 minutes and 59 seconds. When it flew the average flight time (was) around 3 hours 30 minutes, but can be slightly longer if the aircraft (needed) to hold before landing at ...


11

Those are nose (forebody) strakes, from Wikipedia: On both supersonic and subsonic types, smaller strakes are sometimes applied to the forward fuselage to control the fuselage flow at high angles of attack; for example the Concorde SST has small nose strakes "to get a better directional stability". You can also find them on an MD-88 (shown below) ...


11

At the time the jet was in production private jets were still in their infancy. The largest purpose built one was the Grumman Gulfstream II. I have a feeling the Concorde was a bit out of the reach of all firms at the time. In addition by the time the SST had gone into full production, it had largely fallen out of favor for noise and environmental reasons....


11

"We've hardly got any climb on." This is what Concorde's Captain David Rowland said at around 43,000 feet. While Concorde had better thrust/weight ratio compared to a subsonic jet-liner, most of it was needed for the supersonic drag (image source). This drag is what made Concorde cruise-climb as it lost weight (fuel), and also if the air became colder (...


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