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I tried to see what countries are the most advance in developing aircraft. I found that Germany is not so advanced (CMMIW). Indeed, there is Dornier there beside has share in AirBus. I don't know whether they are the biggest share holder or not in AirBus.

In another side, among of the G8 countries, US is the leader. They have lot of aircraft industries. Boeing, Lockheed Martin, GulfStream, and many other. Canada has Bombardier. British has BAe with their RJ70, RJ100, so do Roll Royce with their power plant. Italy has Avanti and Augusta Westland, beside small aircraft industries. France with Dassault, Mirage, also joint venture AirBus, and some more small industries. Russia has Sukhoi, Ilyushin, Tupelov, Mikoyan, Beriev, and there are more. And Japan has Mitsubishi, Kawasaki, and Honda, now they are massively develop and research aircraft, both for civil and military. But Germany is look like not so aggressively take part in this technology like they do in another part. Even China is now growing. With Comac, they has now C919, and now with Russia is developing C929 which will emphasizes their presence in aviation manufacture. ABC, AirBus, Boeing, and Comac are considered as the biggest manufacturer, leaving Germany behind. Is any reason why? Germans probably can explain.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by GdD, xxavier, Ralph J, SMS von der Tann, FreeMan Dec 5 '18 at 14:52

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Setting aside for a second the fact that, imho, this question might be off-topic. Airbus is a Franco-Spanish-German consortium with plenty of plants in Germany. You list it as one of the biggest manufacturers. Why would that leave Germany behind? $\endgroup$ – Federico Dec 5 '18 at 6:52
  • $\begingroup$ indeed, EADS has a lot of German facilities. Germany just elected to merge all or most of its aviation industry into EADS whereas France did not. $\endgroup$ – jwenting Dec 5 '18 at 7:01
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    $\begingroup$ Your spelling of AirBus already implies you did no research on Airbus. $\endgroup$ – Bianfable Dec 5 '18 at 9:10
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    $\begingroup$ You look at big names. Germany's economy is based up on mid-sized manufacturers in general, which are know to the customers for which they matter. hph304j named already some from the aircraft industries. A lot of this mid-size companies merged already into Airbus, therefore the big name is Airbus. Looking at America, McDonnell Douglas merged into Boeing, Lockheed and Martin merged into Lockheed Martin and in Canada large parts of Bombardier are now part of - Airbus. We even create companies for single planes, Eurofighter GmbH (Typhoon) and Panavia Aircraft GmbH (Tornado). $\endgroup$ – Peter Dec 5 '18 at 14:06
  • $\begingroup$ A large part of the reason is that after WWII, Germany was prevented from having any industries that could be used to build up their military. Aircraft production was essentially banned. One of the consequences of this is that there is a robust glider industry. $\endgroup$ – JScarry Dec 5 '18 at 15:03
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May i suggest, you read the wikipedia artikle "History of Airbus".History of Airbus There are also other big aerospace companies in germany, like MTU, DIEHL and LIEBHERR just to name a few. These companies don´t build their own planes, but manufacture major components for the aerospace industrie.

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  • $\begingroup$ Germany was in the head of Aircraft Development, aerodynamics and engines, until May 1945, when all their research was seized, industry destroyed, and constraints put in further development, not the lesser of it their envisaged market size, from taking the place F Engels described as UK goal in his 1845 work about British workers, being a manufacturer nation supplying an agricultural Europe, became impossible. If you don't have enough people buying your products, your industry can't get enough capital for R&D, this is why the population of a nation, besides commodities as energy, matters. OK? $\endgroup$ – Urquiola Dec 5 '18 at 17:13

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