1
$\begingroup$

I was wondering if all generations have this angle of attack sensor, especially after recent 737 MAX Lion Air accident.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Are you sure you are asking about the sensor, as opposed to indication of AoA? Practically all airliners have the former, but not all (esp. western ones) have the latter. $\endgroup$ – Zeus Dec 3 '18 at 0:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Zeus, I don't think any version of 737 has an AoA indicator at all. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Dec 4 '18 at 19:54
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Alpha vanes are absolutely essential sensors providing the stall warning. What contributed to the Lion Air flight 610 accident is not the presence of alpha vanes alone, nor the fact one was installed incorrectly. If they fed just stall warning, it would be relatively easy to recognize it as spurious. The main factors were that the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS)—kind of unusually implemented stick pusher—does not check for mismatch between the sensors, and that maintenance instructions don't include the alpha vanes as possible cause for the issues from preceding flight. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Dec 4 '18 at 20:11
  • $\begingroup$ This is like asking which generation of Civic doesn't have a tachometer. This is not some data you need to feed the computer, but the pilot as well. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 Apr 29 at 19:45
5
$\begingroup$

I have experience on the 737 -100,-200, Classic, Next Gen and the Max8 and even the 707 every one has an AOA sensor. Different part numbers to be sure but they still have them.

Obviously it senses angle of attack and feeds numerous systems: stall warning and auto slat come to mind immediately.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ And to feed the pilot, obviously. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 Apr 29 at 19:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.