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In general, what effect does the angle of attack have on lift and drag?

I understand the the B-25 take-off run was normally in excess of 1500 ft, the exact value dependent upon load, density altitude, pilot skill, etc. The B25s used in the 1942 Tokyo Raid had to take off from the Hornet deck in about 500 ft. I've heard that with coaching from a USN pilot, they learned to optimize the AoA so all 16 made it. So I am interested to know more about the trade-off of lift vs. drag.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome. For context, can you please add the relevant statement concerning the Doolittle Raid? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Mar 7 at 0:42
  • $\begingroup$ I understand the the B-25 take-off run was normally in excess of 1500 ft, the exact value dependent upon load, density altitude, pilot skill, etc. The B25s used in the 1942 Tokyo raid had to take off from the Hornet deck in about 500 ft. With coaching from a USN pilot, they learned to optimize the AoA so all 16 made it. So I am interested to know more about the trade-offof lift vs. Drag. $\endgroup$ – MarkW Mar 8 at 0:34
  • $\begingroup$ My understanding was they put the planes on diet (removed many items to make them a lot lighter). If you have a source that gave you that information, please add it to the question. $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Mar 8 at 4:14
  • $\begingroup$ Ymb1 is correct. I could not find documentation as to how much weight was removed, but according to the books "30 Seconds Over Tokyo" and "I Could Never be so Lucky Again," items removed were radios, tail guns (replaced by painted broom sticks) and the secret Norton Bomb sight. I was looking for general information like that supplied by Michael Hall, below. $\endgroup$ – MarkW Mar 9 at 16:51
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As angle of attack increases, both lift and induced drag will increase until sometime after L/D max is achieved. Beyond that the lift will decrease dramatically. This fundamental principle is the same for Doolittle's raiders as it is for a Cessna 150.

Generic Graphical Representation

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