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Detroit, MI is the center of Class B airspace, however a good portion of that airspace within the inverted wedding cake is in Canada. What are the mechanisms that allow US to define Class B airspace force and effect in Canada?

The VFR Terminal chart for reference: https://aeronav.faa.gov/content/aeronav/tac_files/PDFs/Detroit_TAC_91_P.pdf

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    $\begingroup$ It's not US Class B airspace if it's in Canada. $\endgroup$ – pericynthion Apr 19 '19 at 2:38
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The portion over Canada is not designated US Class B but Canadian Class C.

Note that Canadian Class C airspace definition is similar to US Class B. In particular, VFR aircraft must obtain clearance prior to entry. A mode C transponder is required.

To add: airspace over Canada is generally managed by NAV CANADA. Definition for the Canadian side of the Detroit Terminal Control Area (TCA) can be found in NAV CANADA's Designated Airspace Handbook, portions excerpted below (from page 78):

Summary for Detroit TCA bounding coordinates

We can see that these definitions matches the eastern portions of the Detroit TCA exactly, e.g, the outer area altitudes from 6,000' to 10,000' bounded 30nm from the Detroit VOR (DXO).

The Detroit TCA airspace was modified a few years ago, which required coordination between the FAA and Nav Canada. The following discussion from the US Federal Register (page 3307) may be of further interest:

Also, as noted in the NPRM, the eastern portion of the DTW Class B airspace area extends into Canadian airspace. The equivalent Canadian airspace to Class B airspace, as designated in the United States, is Class C airspace. NAV CANADA, the Canadian air service navigation provider, generally designates Class C airspace with a 12,500 feet MSL ceiling, however, has advised the FAA of its willingness to establish corresponding Canadian Class C airspace adjoining the FAA’s DTW Class B airspace with a ceiling of 10,000 feet MSL. Additionally, NAV CANADA advised it would make the Canadian Class C airspace action effective to match the effective date of this DTW Class B airspace modification action.

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  • $\begingroup$ Who is the controlling agency for the space within Canada? $\endgroup$ – mongo Apr 19 '19 at 12:30
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to aviation.SE! Can you include a source or reference for this information? $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Apr 19 '19 at 15:32
  • $\begingroup$ I've added a couple of references. @mongo in Canada, air traffic / navigation services was privatized in the mid 90s (no longer controlled by a government agency) -- since managed by NAV CANADA, a not-for-profit corporation. $\endgroup$ – peekay Apr 20 '19 at 8:34
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All airspace in each FIR (or UIR) is by default controlled by the corresponding ACC (US: ARTCC). In the case of metro Detroit, it's Cleveland FIR/ARTCC on the US side and Toronto FIR/ACC on the Canadian side.

All other controlling agencies get their airspace by delegation from the ACC via an LOA. Cleveland ARTCC delegates the airspace on the US side to Detroit TRACON, and Toronto FIR/ACC delegates the airspace on the Canadian side also to Detroit TRACON. So, despite being a US agency, Detroit TRACON ends up controlling airspace in Canada as well. This is common along international borders, even in places where the land border isn't as well agreed as the US/Canada one.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you kindly provide a source for this information? $\endgroup$ – mongo Apr 19 '19 at 19:28

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