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Is there a difference between Minimum Safe Altitude and Emergency Safe Altitude? Or are they same things used by different authorities (MSA by EASA and ESA by FAA)?

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    $\begingroup$ Are you sure EASA uses MSA for "Minimum Safe Altitude". All I could find was "Minimum Sector Altitude" (e.g. in SEAR). SKYbrary warns that this is not the same definition. $\endgroup$
    – Bianfable
    Apr 1 at 6:45
  • $\begingroup$ No, I am not sure. That was a guess. $\endgroup$ Apr 4 at 7:30

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Perhaps this helps - from the FAA Glossary -

MINIMUM SAFE ALTITUDE (MSA)-

a. The minimum altitude specified in 14 CFR Part 91 for various aircraft operations.

b. Altitudes depicted on approach charts which provide at least 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance for emergency use. These altitudes will be identified as Minimum Safe Altitudes or Emergency Safe Altitudes and are established as follows:

  1. Minimum Safe Altitude (MSA).
    Altitudes depicted on approach charts which provide at least 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance within a 25-mile radius of the navigation facility, waypoint, or airport reference point upon which the MSA is predicated. MSAs are for emergency use only and do not necessarily assure acceptable navigational signal coverage.

  2. Emergency Safe Altitude (ESA).
    Altitudes depicted on approach charts which provide at least 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance in non-mountainous areas and 2,000 feet of obstacle clearance in designated mountainous areas within a 100-mile radius of the navigation facility or waypoint used as the ESA center. These altitudes are normally used only in military procedures and are identified on published procedures as “Emergency Safe Altitudes.”

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