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In case of depressurization, will the effects of hypoxia be more rapid the greater height the aircraft flies?

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    $\begingroup$ Also Time of Useful Consciousness (TUC) at SKYbrary $\endgroup$
    – mins
    Aug 4, 2021 at 19:05
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what the root confusion might be... If you know what hypoxia actually is, doesn't the question answer itself? $\endgroup$ Aug 4, 2021 at 19:54
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    $\begingroup$ I did a chamber ride to 25000 once as part of a skydiver high alt cert course. It was just to experience and become aware of your onset symptoms. I lasted about 4ish min, then tunnel vision set in (peripheral vision greyed out), then at maybe about 5 min the euphoria came on, in a gush that surprised me. I reconnected my mask and the symptoms vanished after the first or second breath. Buddy who was a smoker was well into euphoria stage and cackling like he was on laughing gas by 3-4 minutes. Weirdly you are drawing shapes and you know they are lopsided, but you think they are fine like that. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Aug 4, 2021 at 22:44

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The higher the altitude at which the plane depressurizes, the quicker the onset of hypoxia- and the less time the pilot has to get his or her oxygen mask on before passing out.

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    $\begingroup$ The "partial pressure" is too low. Problem is, you don't know it when just sitting there. You can't tell unless you are under exertion. You don't realize there is even a problem until you enter the euphoria stage, and then it's too late unless there is someone else to intervene. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Aug 4, 2021 at 22:34

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