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On cars, it is often to replace all four tires at the same time. Is this true also for aircraft?

I imagine the nose gear and main gear probably can be replaced at different intervals. However, are tires within the same gear assembly replaced together? What about left and right gears? For example, is it ok to replace all tires on the left gear only while keeping old tires on the right?

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    $\begingroup$ 'On cars, it is often to replace all four tires at the same time. ' I think this is a false assumption. Most people replace one tyre at a time, or maybe an axle (Front or back) at a time. There's no need to replace all 4 tyres on a car. For light aircraft it's definitely the same (Replace as required) $\endgroup$ – Dan Aug 2 '18 at 8:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Dan in several (maybe many) countries it's required by law to replace all tyres on the same axle together (except in emergencies of course, like putting on a spare when you have a puncture). This to prevent control problems due to uneven wear. $\endgroup$ – jwenting Aug 2 '18 at 10:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Dan I've never not replaced all four tires at the same time, and know of nobody who suggests that. With proper rotation, all four will reach end of life at the same time. Plus you must have tires matched on the drive axle or wear to the differential will result, so if you're replacing one at a time, they become mismatched. (On an AWD/4WD, you'll damage the transfer if all 4 aren't matched). In fact, this observation answers the question: there's no drive axle and differential on an airplane, so there is no need to match tires precisely. $\endgroup$ – user71659 Aug 4 '18 at 5:26
  • $\begingroup$ @user71659 Here in the UK I'd say it's fairly rare to change all tyres at once. Truth is, most people don't rotate and punctures and minor tracking issues will generally dictate that odd tyres get replaced. You won't damage you're average 2WD car by a minor mismatch of tread depth, though of course you should always have 2 similar tyres on an axle $\endgroup$ – Dan Aug 4 '18 at 9:32
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Airline tires are replaced on-condition and are generally recapped until the tire carcass condition deteriorates or is damaged to the point recapping is no longer viable. There is no regulatory limit, at least in North America, on the number of times a tire can be recapped if the carcass is serviceable.

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Nope.. they are replaced 'on condition'. Exception is when one tyre has deflated before landing (cockpit indication and later confirmed) then the good tyre on the same axle has to be replaced irrespective of condition.

Tyres have a hard life and get damaged by rubbish on the runway and stand. Also airplanes don't always hit the ground straight .. when they come in at an angle it wears the side of the thread more on that tyre.

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  • $\begingroup$ True for the US (the only country I have experience) however jwenting implies this is not the case for all countries - though they failed to qualify that statement. $\endgroup$ – jwzumwalt Aug 2 '18 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ @jwzumwalt jwenting's comment was about cars. For them, common sense (and sometimes laws) require to replace tyres on the whole axle. For aircraft, the situation is very different. $\endgroup$ – Zeus Aug 3 '18 at 2:04
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On small planes, tires & inner tubes are used, not like cars which use tubeless tires.

Tires are also different sizes & plys. For example, my POH (Pilot Operating Handbook) calls for 4 ply 5"x5 nose wheel and 6 ply 6"x6 main gear. I recently had a pinhole wear thru on a main gear tire, so it went flat after 2-3 days, requiring a tube change. The tire itself was fine.

So changing the parts that are worn is the norm.

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