StephenS
  • Member for 3 years, 2 months
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  • KADS/KTKI
What flaps and throttle settings are used on takeoff, climb, cruise, descent, and landing?
2 votes

The exact numbers vary for each model of aircraft, so the FAA et al can't provide direct guidance; regulations just say to operate according to the manufacturer's specifications and procedures. Still,...

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In what cases does an airplane return to airport?
Accepted answer
1 votes

It would be impossible to list all the possible emergencies that would make a pilot choose to land rather than continue a flight; it may be easier to list the ones that wouldn't cause them to want to ...

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Why don’t aircraft have interlocks to prevent high-lift devices from being retracted when doing so would stall the airplane?
-1 votes

While flaps do slightly reduce stall speed, that is not their primary purpose. Planes pass quickly through both Vs0 and Vs1 during takeoff or landing, and pilots are too busy to mess with flap ...

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What emergencies or failures should I report to ATC?
Accepted answer
3 votes

You don't specify a country, so I'll answer for the US and hope that other countries are similar. 14 CFR 91.183(c) is the closest I can find to a "requirement" to report an emergency. It only ...

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Why can’t air traffic control radars determine the altitudes of primary targets?
4 votes

Primary (2D) ATC radar provides azimuth and slant distance but not elevation. If you use the slant distance as horizontal distance, it will be somewhat inaccurate, but since aircraft don't fly all ...

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Is the whole world's airspace covered by ATC?
3 votes

The entire world is divided into Flight Information Regions (FIRs), so in theory there is someone responsible for everywhere. However, those FIRs are then subdivided into different classes of ...

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Is this Class G Airspace?
2 votes

Yes, you're reading the chart correctly. Either your drone's GPS is off by quite a bit, or it was deliberately designed to be overly sensitive so that you couldn't accidentally fly into nearby ...

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Flying VFR in uncontrolled airspace, what to do if one spots an apparently out-of-control fire on the ground?
1 votes

Who you call doesn't depend on whether you're in controlled airspace, but whether you can reach them may. Call whoever you would call for anything in that general area, and if they can't hear/see you (...

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Do any aircraft have a "self-contained ILS"?
11 votes

Approaches guided by GPS are called RNAV; it can provide both lateral and vertical guidance, in some cases to the same precision as ILS Cat I, without need for a radar altimeter--which is not standard ...

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confusion between RNAV and RNP approaches and specifiations
2 votes

RNAV was/is in the older model where each approach was designed around a specific technology, and any detected failure to meet the (assumed) fixed accuracy of that technology means you can't use the ...

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Are there any publically available recordings of conversations between ATC and pilots?
18 votes

LiveATC.net has live and recorded ATC radio for most countries/airports. There are lots of flight tracking websites, e.g. FlightAware, that have live and recorded radar/ADS-B tracks. You'll have to ...

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What would be a safe minimum vertical separation distance between passenger-carrying multicopter aircraft?
1 votes

The downwash is directly related to total lift; more rotors just means each rotor is producing a smaller fraction of the total, and the end result should be no different for separation purposes than ...

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With radio not working, why it is more important to stay away from exactly class D airspace?
Accepted answer
4 votes

The procedure in the linked answer assumes you're VFR. If you're in class A airspace, that means you must be IFR, and there are specific (and somewhat different) procedures for IFR flights that lose ...

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Please provide some expert commentary to the aborted flight of the German chancellor
Accepted answer
3 votes

Satellite phones would be for passenger use. Over land, ATC uses VHF/UHF radio, and over sea, ATC uses HF radio or (text-based) satellite data links. Based solely on the quotes in the question, it ...

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Compering between ILS / BARO-VNAV
1 votes

ILS provides both lateral and vertical guidance with high precision, which means aircraft using an ILS are allowed to get very close to the ground and each other without visual contact; in theory, a ...

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Is there any website which is offering free real time tracking data of flights?
1 votes

There are numerous web sites that provide flight tracking data, including radar and ADS-B. Most are free for personal use, but AFAIK all of them charge for commercial use. This makes sense since ...

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When an emergency happens, why do pilots need to stay on the current ATC frequency?
Accepted answer
2 votes

This doesn't mean you won't change frequencies if you move into another controller's sector or there's another reason for a handoff, such as moving from Center to Approach or Approach to Tower; it's ...

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Please explain real-world procedures behind this "ATC joke"
Accepted answer
11 votes

As you commented, it's a play on "state [say] your intentions". However, the pilot has said his intentions several times and ATC rejected them each time, so he's turning it around by asking ATC to ...

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Is there a specific procedure for grounding a pilot?
0 votes

It depends what you mean by "grounded". In the case of suspending or revoking a license, I think it requires a civil case in front of an Administrative Law Judge--unless the pilot voluntarily ...

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What does "radar contact" mean in ATC calls?
1 votes

Context: You will typically get this the first time you contact an ATC facility and they reply with a squawk code. "Radar contact" is to tell you that they now know which blip (aka contact) on their ...

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Is it possible to know why an airline operates specific equipment on certain routes?
4 votes

There are many factors, but you can often predict what class of plane will be used for a particular route by the distance and demand. For smaller cities, they want to fill the planes, but they also ...

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How to achieve shorter taxiing time by elongating the airfield
0 votes

Notice that most airports are square-ish. For various reasons, it's usually a lot easier to get a compact parcel of land than a long, thin one. In particular, aviation authorities really don't like ...

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How can we avoid running out of airport abbreviations?
6 votes

There are multiple airport code systems. The one you seem to be asking about is the 3-letter IATA code, which is mostly assigned to airports with scheduled commercial service--and even some railway ...

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Are you required to disclose medical conditions to your flight instructor?
4 votes

There is no obligation to disclose anything to your CFI, just your AME. That said, your CFI may have useful advice about common problems, if you're willing to talk about them, and they may suggest ...

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Need help to clarify the terms "arrival", "departure", "approach", "terminal" and "transition" fix for US STAR and SIDS
2 votes

A standard arrival procedure (STAR) will have multiple entry fixes (called "transitions" because that's where you transition from the en route phase to the terminal phase) that converge on a single ...

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Instrument approach DME VS instrument approch ILS DME
2 votes

The name for each approach indicates what equipment is required, so DME, ILS/DME and LOC/DME would all be different--and some aircraft may be able to fly one but not another. Generally, the better (i....

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Who decided which airspaces not to fly through and how?
0 votes

In addition to permits, some countries simply don't allow planes registered in certain other countries to overfly them, period. Conversrly, some countries dont allow their own planes to overfly ...

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Where do extra planes come from?
14 votes

HF radios are only used on transoceanic flights, so in that specific case, all the airline had to do was swap your plane for another one at LAX that had a working one but didn't need it, i.e. a ...

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"Total time away from gate", "Longest time away from gate" - what does this mean?
1 votes

Planes can be stuck on the tarmac for long enough periods that they no longer have enough fuel to make it to their destination safely, so they have to return to a gate to get more--and as soon as they'...

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In the US, is there a way for a pilot to legally "maneuver at will" in actual IMC?
6 votes

"Maneuvering at will" within a particular area is called "work". This is particularly common for news/police helicopters, which often need to wander around above some event in class B/C airspace. I've ...

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