Phil Crowther
  • Member for 4 years, 9 months
  • Last seen more than a week ago
1 answers
1 votes
73 views
Equations for Computing Temperature and Air Density Ratios at Different Altitudes
3 votes

Yes, there are equations that can provide you with values that agree with the values in the ISA tables down to the nearest 100,000th (five digits), using the Geopotential altitudes. Different ...

View answer
4 answers
3 votes
285 views
What are some of the longest flights without modern navigation systems?
2 votes

Don't Forget the flights over the poles: May 9, 1926 - Richard Byrd and Floyd Bennett in Fokker tri-motor made first flight over North Pole from Spitsbergen Island and back, a distance of 1,535 miles ...

View answer
2 answers
1 votes
406 views
Is there any clear picture or drawing, of a Wright brothers' plane, published before August 12, 1908?
2 votes

Are you seriously concluding that the Wright brothers did not fly until 1908 based on the absence of a published picture and a couple of outlier statements? In the past, it has been all too easy for ...

View answer
3 answers
33 votes
7k views
Why did the B-29 have so much leftward torque at take-off?
2 votes

Something about the Tibbets statement does not ring true. I have talked to dozens of B-29 pilots and not one of them mentioned having to do either of those things during takeoff: stepping on the ...

View answer
3 answers
1 votes
442 views
What forward airspeed produces maximum rate-of-climb in helicopters?
1 votes

I find that the easiest way to visualize the answer is with a "power available" chart, which shows both the power available and the power required. Above is a chart from an article by Frank ...

View answer
4 answers
14 votes
9k views
Why does the Cessna 172S Skyhawk use only two blade fixed pitched prop?
1 votes

This is not a hypothetical question since Cessna did manufacture versions of the 172 that included constant speed props. These included: The FR172, aka "The Reims Rocket", produced in ...

View answer
5 answers
5 votes
3k views
Are we changing the angle of attack by changing the pitch of an aircraft?
1 votes

In your Question, you asked for an explanation the NASA image. As pointed out, the image is incorrect because the Lift vector appears to be greater than the Weight vector. The reason the image may be ...

View answer
9 answers
32 votes
7k views
Is excess lift or excess power needed for a climb?
1 votes

Interesting example. MY INTERPRETATION OF THE QUESTION [NEW] Here is an image from GlobalSecurity.org which I have modified to illustrate my interpretation of the question. The angle of attack of the ...

View answer
15 answers
94 votes
17k views
Are wings any more efficient at creating lift, versus orienting the engine's thrust downwards?
0 votes

Regarding the article: You say that your understanding is that the article says that wings on an airplane basically create lift by "pushing" air down. This statement is incorrect to the ...

View answer
6 answers
29 votes
6k views
Can a fighter jet land on a modified airliner?
0 votes

Don't forget the good old space shuttle: Although the shuttle was not landed on the 747, it does demonstrate that it is aerodynamically possible to fly piggyback. The picture illustrates another ...

View answer
4 answers
10 votes
1k views
Why does the P-51 Mustang take so much altitude to recover from a spin?
0 votes

The POH for the P-51 (p. 24) indicates that stalls and spins are easily handled. However, the war stories I have read and videos I have seen indicate that a spin in a P-51 could be quite violent. This ...

View answer
8 answers
22 votes
20k views
Does lift equal weight in a climb?
-2 votes

Upon further consideration, I concur with the Answers concluding that, in a climb, Lift is less than Weight. The applicable formula which appears in several engineering sources indicates that, in a ...

View answer