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One of the reasons for this is too cause the wing to stall differently or at a different rate at different parts of the wing. In other words the angle of attack near the tip of the wing will be lower than the angle of attack near the root. This will cause the wing near the body of the plane to reach the critical angle of attack and stall before the wing ...


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The A320 wing is a complex design with no clear mention of chord or angle of incidence, as it is not topical to the operation of the aircraft. The wing is swept back, has variable symmetry from root to tip , as some say twisted. This info is not shared by Airbus.


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You can use the Lifting Line Theory to first calculate the downwash at each spanwise station, which are then converted to the induced AOA ($\alpha_i$). The sectional moment coefficient and lift coefficient are: $$c_m = c_{m_0}+c_{m_\alpha}(\alpha-\alpha_i)$$ $$c_l=c_{l_0}+a(\alpha-\alpha_i)$$ To get the total moment of a straight tapered wing (about the root ...


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I would recommend the use of Aeolus ASP for aerodynamic shape optimisation. Edit: I am not associated with the software in any way. I had found its shape optimisation features useful for an assignment at my university.


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The really big show stopper in the high wing/low wing issue for airliners is bullet point #3 in Peter's answer; the need to place the wing box for the high wing mostly outside the circumference of the fuselage, so overall frontal area is higher and you have this big projection above the fuselage. This is driven by the need for headroom in the cabin as shown ...


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Large commercial aircraft have low wings to easily stow away their long landing gears in the wing root, to hide the wing spar carry-through below the passenger deck, and to improve the accessibility of wing-mounted engines. Long gears make it possible to stretch the fuselage and still be able to rotate during take-off. Stretching makes it possible to ...


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The leading-edge slat was independently invented by Gustav Lachmann and Handley Page just after WWI. (Lachmann presently came to the UK to work for Handley Page.) It diverts airflow downwards over the wing, allowing the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack and hence at lower airspeeds, without stalling. It is most needed near the wing tips and, as it ...


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No. Slow-moving also means low mass flow. In order to re-energize the boundary layer, the air has to move fast, meaning high mass flow. Also, speed means reduced pressure, so the stagnation pressure is not sufficient to produce that desired high-energy flow. Also, contamination (bugs, ice) accretes close to the stagnation point. Ideally, in order to remove ...


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