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0

I haven't climbed out of an airplane at extremely high speeds, and would prefer not to do so. I've climbed out of many at lower speeds and altitudes (to low 20,000's), and have free-fallen. The best description I can offer for being in freefall or in the free air slipstream outside of an airplane is that it's like floating in loud water that you can breathe....


2

A LOT of wind 3-5 times the speed, means 9-25 times the drag, as subsonic drag scales roughly with square of speed. Multiply that by the relative density of air at your cruising altitude. For 30000ft, that is 37.5% So: You would feel 3.4 - 9.4 times the wind drag / air rush. You might also notice the difference in wind chill factor. The -45C air will feel ...


0

It would be incredibly painful for a minute or so, and then you’d be dead. As others have noted, drag goes goes up with the square of speed, so three times the speed means nine times the drag. If you used a simple belt harness, the belt would be pulled straight through your torso. The two halves of your body would then free-fall, but you’d lose consciousness ...


21

This is from Irish Luck - Surviving Partial Ejection from A-6 Aircraft. In this incident, the bombardier/navigator's ejection seat came part way out of an A-6, leaving the head and upper body exposed. (The web page includes pictures of the incident, as well as the pilot's account of the event.) Some quotes from the bombardier/navigator's report: Before I ...


30

It won't be pleasant. The main result of being exposed outside at altitude, besides the obvious hypothermia, frostbite and hypoxia, will be bruising from the 280-ish knot slipstream (it's the indicated airspeed that matters as far was what you feel, not the true airspeed), and injuries from being flung around by any turbulent flow you are in. Most of your ...


12

A skydiver in free fall is fully supported (i.e. no longer accelerating, but falling at constant velocity) at about the same speed as your example motorcycle. Wind resistance is generally proportional to the square of speed, other factors equal (same shape in the same orientation, mainly), so moving at three times the speed on the wing of an airliner would ...


-2

If we are talking about 737 then there is maximum headwind. Landing speed for 737 is Vref + 1/2 headwind and cannot exceed Vref + 20. That means that maximum headwind component can not be more than 40knot


1

The only speed that matters to a fixed wing airplanes ability to keep flying is airspeed. Whether that airspeed results from acquired groundspeed or changing headwind is irrelevant. To the airplane, airspeed and any kind of wind are the same thing. No airspeed, no airlift and yes, that turns flying into falling, which makes the ground come up. However,... ...


5

Yes. The theoretical concept of "moving with the airmass" essentially says that for any given constant wind or no wind, airspeed is dependent on thrust and drag and reaches a steady state. However, in nature, especially close to the ground, obstacles such as buildings, trees and hills can make airflow anything but constant. This is why the modern ...


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