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The buoyancy of hydrogen is not as high as expected, and is even lower at high altitude due to the lower ratio of the density of hydrogen and air. Just for comparison: The tail tank of the A380 has a capacity of 23698 l. When this tank is filled with kerosene / air / hydrogen, the content weights: Substance | Density [kg/l] | Weight of 23698 l [kg] ...


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It is customary to pump liquid fuel for this purpose, as a given trim change requires far less volume than moving gas around. Exchanging the actual gas requires large volumes, and also some way to keep the hydrogen and air separate as their relative volumes change. Airships typically have an inner gasbag called a ballonet for this purpose. In the case of an ...


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Airbus will store hydrogen by chemically binding it to carbon for a looong time. This way, it can be put into the wings, a belly tank and the horizontal tail and its gradual disappearance during the flight will not shift the center of gravity much. What the PR department just published is just for political correctness. It has not been thoroughly checked for ...


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The situation is not as dire as one might think, as the energy content per kilogram of hydrogen is 3.3 times larger than that of kerosene (142 vs 43 MJ/kg): Wikipedia: Energy Density - Energy density in energy storage and in fuel Taking into account a slight weight saving in wings, and a little heavier hydrogen tank and fuel lines (insulation, pressure),...


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As you said, it will vary by airline. Mine has a few screens, and the pilots enter in number adults and children in each seating zone, number of total infants, number of standard and heavy items in cargo, any additional weight in cargo (shipping cargo, mail, ballast, etc). Also the desired runways to get data for and their condition (dry, wet, snow, etc). ...


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