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2

While I don't know of any airplanes that move load in flight for CG purposes, there are definitely airplanes that have various fuel tanks that can be used to trim the airplane during flight. Some of these systems will move the CG aft after takeoff for better performance in cruise, and then move the CG forward before landing for a more stable approach and ...


0

Desert Air makes R/C aircraft engines. The 200 cc DA-200 puts out around 19 hp. I would go with 3 DA-100, two on the wing, one on the nose, giving it the Ford Trimotor look. But these engines run around $ 1000.00 US dollars each, and are NOT designed for human flight. It may be possible to time share a safer aircraft such as a Cessna 152 at a local ...


1

Scale up to the DA-150L, https://www.desertaircraft.com/products/da150l. It's more mature and widely available. With a 32x12" prop it gives 82 pounds of thrust at 5400 RPM. It puts out 16 hp. The "original ultralight" Easy Riser flew with just 11 hp. So it's possible. Here's some broader discussion of more than just the powerplant: Can an ultralight ...


1

You can use any engine in a homebuilt or ultralight, including one from a Model A Ford if you want. A 10 hp RC engine that runs at 8000 rpm? Even if you were building a single seat ultralight, in most cases you'd need at least 3 to 4 of them to have any kind of decent performance, if you could stand the racket they make. For something that can carry two ...


4

It's a 100cc engine, and it's in the Radio Control section of that web site. It's an engine for model aircraft. I suppose, technically, that's a home-built aircraft, but you're not going to sit in it!


17

They probably had a fuel imbalance that was marginally outside the limit for takeoff, and perhaps the powered fuel transfer system was unserviceable and was deferred. Typically there is a gravity transfer capability by just opening a transfer valve and letting fuel run across on its own with the imbalance present, or by skidding slightly. If they were say ...


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The Maximum Taxi Weight (MTW) is one of the weight limitations in the FCOM: (Boeing 737-800 FCOMv1 L.10.3 Limitations - Operating Limitations - Weight Limitations) It can be the limiting factor when the actual takeoff weight including required fuel is very close to the MTOW and adding taxi fuel would get you above this limit. Note that the difference ...


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