Hot answers tagged

24

You can't get real-time data from the FAA without an operational need, and organizations which do receive real-time data cannot legally re-distribute this data publicly, except to other organizations approved by the FAA. An operational need pretty much means you have to be a flight dispatcher for an airline or commercial operator, not just have an interest ...


21

The OpenSky Network has a free open-source API for real-time air traffic data. In its current version it allows users to retrieve live (and partially historical data). The data is retrieved by a network of ADS-B receivers and consists of ICAO 24-bit transponder ID to identify the aircraft the flight's callsign aircraft's current location (latitude, ...


20

No, you were not nearly involved in an accident. If the flight crew is ready to go, an Airbus A320 takes about 40-50 seconds from the moment take-off clearance is given until lift-off. As soon as the aircraft is off the runway, the next one can land. On some busy airports, 60 seconds between take-off clearance and the next landing is a daily occurrence. ...


12

Nice question. There are several ways how to get these information. http://www.fallingrain.com/: free to use, no registration needed. World database of the airports and waypoints. From these information you could easily make DB for waypoints. EUROCONTROL EAD (https://www.ead.eurocontrol.int/eadcms/eadsite/index.php.html): free to use, registration needed. ...


12

Yes, and no. FlightAware (and I believe FlightRadar24) will show General Aviation aircraft (I panned around a bit and found N802AF, a Pilatus, buzzing around over Bethlehem, Pennsylvania just now). The catch is most of these systems are fed with ATC data, and generally only pick up flights that are either on an instrument flight plan, or which have picked ...


11

TL;DR To properly track GA aircraft, one needs to operate professional equipment or an ATC datastream, both which are not available to most websites. Flight radar 24 shows GA traffic in some occasions, but in general it cannot track these aircraft. FR24 works primarily on ADS-B, which is a surveillance technology that transmits aircraft information ...


8

Although this is a question based on opinion, it might perhaps have some value as a community wiki so I've marked this 'answer' as such. I also borrowed one of Manfred's links. Feel free to append stuff to the list. In terms of free download, I can definitely recommend the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook which can be found on the FAA web site. There are also a ...


8

I have both US and Australian PPLs, and having flown VFR in both countries, there are some real differences in the VFR charts and supplemental data available. Mostly the contents are fairly evident but if you are unfamiliar with a specific type of VFR chart, it is important to look over the chart in detail to make sure you understand it. The US publishes ...


8

I use the National Flight Data Center at http://nfdc.faa.gov I had to write them a letter explaining why I wanted the data (http://fplan.sf.net) and they provided me with a login. Now, every 56 days, they send me an email telling me there's an update available. Bad news: they recently switched from a flat file to some unbelievably convoluted xml format ...


8

The current QNH at an airport is included in METARs so you can grab it form there. There are a few online services to retrieve the METAR automatically, such as this one (using Vienna airport as an example). The latest METAR when I wrote this answer was: LOWW 281050Z 14010KT 9999 FEW040 SCT065 BKN300 04/M03 Q1012 NOSIG which shows a QNH of 1012. Note that ...


5

One possible source is Skyvector You can use it like a paper map using the Latitude and Longitude markings to find waypoints (or other positions). E.g. What waypoints and routes are near S30°0.00' E112°00.00' Hints: Click "World Hi", use your mouse's scroll-wheel to zoom, play with "Layers". There are also sites with lists, by region, of waypoints with ...


5

SkyVector is a great resource for aviation maps and data of all kinds. It offers worldwide sectional- and low-ifr-type charts, and a fully-featured Airports section. I'm not sure if you also want airport diagrams, but you may also get some decent results with OpenStreetMap. The open source maps have some hit-or-miss levels of detail for airports, some ...


4

FltPlan.com has a great airport mapping engine. Just click on "Nearby Airports" on the main page and enter the location that you want to search around. You can search by zip code, city name, or an existing airport id and filter the results by minimum runway length, distance, approach types, and fuel. Here's an example of the results:


4

The term you want to look for is not "accident", but "incident". To figure out whether or not a situation qualifies as an “aircraft accident” we must look to the definitions in Part 830. The NTSB defines an “aircraft accident” to mean “an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the ...


4

Geographic (routes, land-based infrastructure) data: http://ourairports.com/data/ http://openflights.org/data.html Coordination (scheduling, flight numbers) data: http://www.virtualradarserver.co.uk/FlightRoutes.aspx Aircraft (registration) data: List of national government registers - http://www.gatwickaviationsociety.org.uk/registers_official.asp ICAO ...


4

Another good one for airports and navaids: http://opennav.com/ - has VORs, waypoints, etc.


3

flightradar24 takes as input mainly ADS-B data, as explained here. It seems to be enough to know scheduled departure and arrival time, departure and arrival airport, registration number and some extra pieces of data you may not need. For technical failure, you may see the aviation herald website (I don't know how to access ACARS messages)


3

Airservices Australia now publishes electronic versions for free. Use requires acceptance of an agreement. Access as follows: Click Publications on the Air Services Australia website. Click Aeronautical Information Products – (AIP) at the top. Accept the agreement Select an AIP Charts option on the subsequent page.


3

One place to look is models of the planes for flight simulators. There is generally a "sounds" folder of some sort inside the airplane folder that includes some cockpit sounds. I'm guessing the original files are proprietary and there is really no reason for the companies to freely share them. Shows like Air Crash Investigation might get access to a ...


3

FlightAware picks up GA traffic, but only if it is on a flight plan (which sometimes includes VFR aircraft receiving flight following) or if the aircraft is ADS-B Out equipped and within their ADS-B coverage areas. Either way, you're not currently going to get a full picture of the environment from any source - not in the way that ATC does, at least. Public ...


3

World Aero Data shows airports on a map, although I did find an airport which isn't mentioned. Other than that, the map and airports are easily visible, irrespective of zoom level.


3

I have successfully used The GPX Aviation Waypoint Generator from the free Navaid database (http://navaid.com/GPX/) that outputs a GPX (XML type) file with all the waypoints, airports and every other elements you choose to include. To make a request on this API, make sure you specify the min and max GPS coordinates of the area you want to cover. This is a ...


3

NOAA collects METARs (current weather) from all over the world and publishes them at http://weather.noaa.gov/pub/data/observations/metar/stations/. They also collect TAFs (forecasts) and publish them at http://weather.noaa.gov/pub/data/forecasts/taf/stations/. These reports are what the information told to pilots by controllers or broadcast in ATIS is ...


2

OurAirports, the continuation of DAFIF by community effort (since Australia (and possibly some other countries) copyrighted their official data) would be the obvious one.


2

I did a quick google search and this was a link that I found. Although, the quality of these samples leaves a lot to be desired.


2

Flyermaps provides Australian VFR charts.


2

For historical data, I really like http://flightaware.com/. Even a GA pilot, if one requests VFR flight following, can see a history of his radar returns which can be useful as a student pilot. It also allows you to gather information on commercial flight number.


2

For historical FAA IFR flight plan data, you can get it from www.flightaware.com. They show five minute delayed, and with a free registered account you can get access to the last 90 days worth of data. You can pay for data older than that and I believe in different data formats. I'm not aware of a similar source for other parts of the world.


2

This is my first post so bare with me. I don't know if you are trying to get one region only or a global data set. The issue is that member states are responsible for their own airspace and thus airport/NAVAID/intersection/waypoint/so-on-and-so-forth location data. You may want to see about getting a copy of ICAO document 7910 "Manual of ICAO identifiers" ...


2

I got this response via email from the FAA: PilotWeb is considered a Legacy Application based on the USNS, United States NOTAM System. The FNS, Federal NOTAM System, NOTAM Search is a new application. Many Legacy applications will eventually be replaced with the newer FNS applications over the next year. Both applications should be able to provide you ...


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