21

Australia Brisbane / Melbourne FIRs boundary PUDYA SWEED LIPPS ALIDL CLOZA TOUDA PHONE (Put your sweet lips a little closer to the phone, Jim Reeves) Brisbane RWY19 STARs LEAKY BOATS SINNK and DRAIN PLUGG SINNK. BLAKA MOOVI by the South. Gold Coast (YBCG) SID 14/32 LUVLY MEETA MAIDS (Lovely meter maids) USA Frederick, Maryland (KFDK) RNAV (GPS) RWY 5 ...


19

Wait until the frequency isn't terribly busy on one of your flights, then just: "Unfamiliar with Creek waypoint, Request clarification" You can reasonably expect them to either explain the waypoint, or if they're busy, potentially give you a phone number or other contact info to try from the ground. You can also call an Airport Manager (801-852-6715) for ...


16

No, they are not interchangeable and indeed, have well defined meanings. A fix is an arbitrary point in space used to establish current position calculated by referring to external references. You take a fix to determine where you are now. A fix might be permanent, for example a compulsory reporting point, or it might be determined by the pilot in advance ...


13

The CAVLR3 is an example of an RNAV procedure. A requirement to fly an RNAV procedure is for the aircraft to have navigation equipment capable of finding all of those points. There are many thousands of those waypoints, and it would create way too much clutter to show them all on a chart. For a pilot planning on flying the CAVLR3, the Enroute H-10 chart can ...


13

I thought this was pretty creative. "Follow the yellow brick road" found on GPS 1R approach into Wichita, Kansas.


12

Published waypoints are waypoints that appear on the charts and in the published navigation databases used by GPS navigators or FMSes. They are referenced using the published identifier for the waypoint. Examples: TPA, ITAWT. Unpublished waypoints are waypoints created by the pilot. FMS allow for the creation/entry of a waypoint by the pilot. The ...


12

That's part of the High Altitude Redesign (HAR) program. As far as the available information, it's now available for flights above FL390, and only in certain ARTCC's in the U.S. The waypoint naming convention is as follows: There are plans to have this system implemented worldwide. The pilot will no longer be limited by airways based on ground navaids. I....


11

Ground based radio navigation (VOR, VORTAC, LORAN, NDB) by necessity have ground stations to handle generation, amplification and broadcasting the signals used for navigation. Here is an example of what a VOR station looks like: "Table Rock VOR" by ZabMilenko - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/...


8

The context of your question is a bit unclear, but assuming that you're asking about navigation waypoints in the US then you're probably referring to these terms as defined in the FAA's Pilot/Controller Glossary: FLY-BY WAYPOINT- A fly-by waypoint requires the use of turn anticipation to avoid overshoot of the next flight segment. FLY-OVER WAYPOINT-...


8

Previous waypoints are not shown on the 787's CDU, and only the last waypoint or PPOS (present position at which a direct-to was initiated) shows on the ND. The 787 EFB does not show the plane position. Only very recently the FAA allowed own-ship display on moving maps. As to why, there is no use for it. The POS REPORT page on the 787 would show the three ...


8

The transition point as defined in RTCA DO-283 RNP MOPS is the point where the aircraft's path passes through a vertical plane that bisects the inbound and outbound legs going through the waypoint. That generic description covers all the possibilities of the aircraft passing the waypoint regardless of how good or bad it is following the defined path. ...


7

You didn't mention if you're asking about a specific country or jurisdiction (although your question seems to be based on European information), but here's some information about the US situation. A published waypoint is simply what it sounds like: it's a waypoint that's published on a chart, approach procedure etc. and has a name. This question has more ...


5

Read it as "wicked party" and Boston is famous for sea food, including crab claws. Chowder, lobster and claws.


5

It's worm, as in tequila worm: Perhaps even more popular than the actual tequila is the worm crawling around the bottom of the bottle. But the worm, or gusano, actually originated with tequila's “lower-quality” cousin, mezcal, largely as a marketing ploy. The gusano is the larvae of a type of moth that lives on the agave plant.—huffingtonpost.com


5

As described in the answer to the previous question, all of the points on the chart are both waypoints and fixes. The difference between the printed icons is how they are identified from the air. The waypoints marked by hexagons, some with darkened edges and some printed inside a square, note where the waypoint is on top of a VOR. This includes Razorback, ...


5

RNAV freed aircraft from the airways that were already in place that may have zig zagged from VOR to VOR, but with the limitations of the ATC system based on human controllers, it is still desirable to keep most aircraft on a "road network" so to speak to make it easy to manage separation, so RNAV airways were created between major centers that provide ...


5

ICAO does actually recommend that names for significant points are unique: 3.4 The unique five-letter pronounceable name-code designator assigned to a significant point shall not be assigned to any other significant point. However, as you already know, not all names are in fact unique. So why is that? This is unnecessary (it would be possible to ...


3

Altitude limits on these procedures have to take many different things into account, including obstacle clearance and communication, but also radar coverage, separation from other procedures and airspace, the overall profile of the procedure, noise abatement, and more. The at or above 2500 restriction on the DEEZZ is similarly included in the other SIDs at ...


3

If you don't already have one, get a SLC Terminal Area Chart. Sometimes they will depict VFR reporting points that the Sectionals will not. Also, airports themselves will publish local area course rules that contain points like this. Check with an FBO, flight school, or tower. And if not published anywhere, just ask as Abelenky suggested.


2

According to the Pilot/Controller Glossary: WAYPOINT− A predetermined geographical position used for route/instrument approach definition, progress reports, published VFR routes, visual reporting points or points for transitioning and/or circumnavigating controlled and/or special use airspace, that is defined relative to a VORTAC station or in ...


2

From the Thales Pilot Guide: If ABEAM PTS are desired: ABEAM PTS [3R] .......... Confirm/Press If Option 1 is defaulted, ABEAM PTS is displayed yellow, if not press [3R]. ND shows direct track (dashed yellow), as entered, superimposed on existing ACTIVE F-PLN. Abeam WPTs are named ABxxxxx, xxxxx representing the first five characters of the ...


2

You can find the routes them selves here, the start and end points are noted like other airway intersections by phonetic names. You can look up the names here (use world hi maps to see them) for exact locations. For example you can see a route start at TUDEP and if you take a look on SkyVector you will find (lat/long in the top corner):


2

The answer is embedded within the question: The pilot is able to distinguish between the two fixes because they are in different regions.


2

Waypoints do not have to have unique names as long as they are separated by enough distance so that confusion over names would be highly unlikely.


1

If you go to Skyvector.com and enter Departure and Destination airports, then select Routes, it will show you a preferred routing using waypoints that I think tries to use airways when possible. If you change the altitude, different routes will show up. In practice, for smaller planes anyway, I think most of us pick routes that will go as direct as possible,...


1

Another way to see what routes are typically used for IFR flights in the US is to use the FlightAware IFR Route Analyzer. You can enter an origin and destination to see the routes from flight plans from the past 24 hours. Of course, note the warnings: For IFR flight planning, be certain to note altitude, type of aircraft and verify on terminal ...


1

Routes were traditionally built using SIDs, airways and STARs, not individual waypoints (aka fixes). From the departure airport, there will typically be multiple Standard Instrument Departure routes, each spreading out to several "transition" fixes. At the other end, there will be similar Standard Terminal Arrival Routes and transition fixes. Then you find ...


1

In real life the flight planning process starts with where you are, where you are going, and then you make decisions on routing based on considerations such as weather, terrain, alternate airfields, airspace, VFR vs IFR, etc. Looking at the chart you will then choose appropriate waypoints along that route of flight based on the aircraft navigation equipment....


1

There are no "GNSS waypoints". GNSS is a common position source for RNAV, though not the only one. All RNAV waypoints, like conventional (e.g. VOR/DME) fixes, have an identifier composed of five alphanumeric characters that is unique within a country. Some countries don't use numbers (e.g. the US); others do.


1

You are partially correct, first of all they are called "RNAV routes" not "RNAV airways" and yes the entire point of RNAV was not needing to fly along a suboptimal preset path but that was because of the fact that you flight plan had you flying directly over the navigational beacons. Like this: RNAV routes allow more efficient flight by connecting random ...


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