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4

Vx increases with altitude while Vy decreases with altitude. When they coincide, you have reach the airplane’s absolute ceiling, which it can no longer climb and can only maintain altitude at that specific calibrated airspeed. Vx and Vy do exist above you maximum single engine ceiling, however, should an engine fail above the maximum single engine ceiling ...


9

The maximum cruise speed from the brochure is a True Airspeed value and is based on the highest TAS achieved with the engines operating at the maximum cruise power rating specified by the engine manufacturer, based on some altitude and load condition that is probably buried somewhere in the fine print (we could probably assume the 365 kt value is at max ...


9

The 365 knots listed in that brochure is (as noted in the text) the maximum cruise speed. That is the maximum speed at which the aircraft can be expected to operate under normal circumstances in level flight. It is not related to the Never Exceed speed, which depends on the structural limits of the aircraft (as well as air pressure and atmospheric conditions ...


1

In a descending turn, maintain the same glide speed. Your rate of descent will increase, but you can fly the same speed. The issue of load factor in a banked turn applies to a level turn. In a descent, fly your glide speed and let the descent rate increase.


4

During a turn the load factor increases. This increases the apparent weight. Thus, during a turn, the best glide speed is selected according to the weight times the load factor. The load factor at 30 degrees bank is $$n=\frac{1}{\cos{\theta}} \approx 1.2$$ The best glide speed is thus the best glide speed for a weight that is 1.2 times your actual weight. ...


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