29

There is no limit to the number of type ratings that a person can hold. The world record for most type ratings held by an individual currently stands at 105! For safety reasons, most airlines only allow a pilot to be currently assigned to two aircraft types at one time so that they don't start to confuse the different airplanes and mix things up. This isn't ...


14

Airline pilots are typically only certified and current on one type. It is rare for a pilot to be certified and current on multiple types because they must do re-current training and check rides for each type in order to remain current and legal. The extra cost for training and check rides would not make financial sense to an airline trying to be competitive ...


11

@CrossRoads is sort of correct, but is off on the details. The comments cover some of it, and I’d like to clarify and add some detail. For purposes of airmen certification aircraft are divided into Categories and within Categories there are classes. 14 CFR §61.5 Certificates and ratings issued under this part. (1) Aircraft category ratings—(i) Airplane....


11

The answer to this lies in 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 18 - Conduct an Airline Transport Pilot Certification, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings. In most cases, yes the type rating "upgrades" or "elevates" along with your license since the type rating is always evaluated at ATP standards, even if you only have a private or commercial ...


11

Actually, it doesn't matter whether you are a Private pilot or an ATP, the requirements for a type rating are in the Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards, which apply regardless of the aircraft type. In the PTS, it says: Practical Test Book Description This practical test book contains the Airline Transport ...


10

The short of it is that most such ex-military aircraft, and replicas built new to spec on these designs, do not have a "type" as defined by the FAA at all. Because the absence of a type means the aircraft can't be certified as airworthy in the normal way, and pilots of these aircraft cannot receive a type rating to fly them, the certification of aircraft and ...


10

A flight school can offer an "abbreviated type rating course" which takes into account skills from previous type ratings, assuming you have flown an adequate number of flight hours on those ratings. Boeing also offers a shortened type rating course, details are halfway down their page. To answer your question, Boeing claims 13-15 days for their training and ...


9

If two aircraft (let's call them Aircraft A and Aircraft B, since this isn't specific to 777/787) share a type rating (technically known as a "common type rating"), it means that, if a pilot is already certified to fly Aircraft A, and wants to get certified to fly Aircraft B, they only have to take a course on the parts of Aircraft B that are different from ...


8

61.63(d)(1) requires that if you don't have an ATP that you hold an instrument rating to obtain a type rating. The type rating itself does not grant instrument privileges. (d) Additional aircraft type rating. Except as provided under paragraph (d)(6) of this section, a person who applies for an aircraft type rating or an aircraft type rating to be completed ...


8

In the US, the FAA's requirements for obtaining authorization to fly former ,military aircraft is included in 8900.1 Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 2. It is quite lengthy and covers more than just former military aircraft. As others have pointed out, most of these aircraft do not have a Type Certificate. They normally have a Special Airworthiness ...


8

In addition to a type rating, you cannot fly a 737 without a commercial pilot's license and 1,200 flight hours. Further, your flight and maintenance operation must be certificated by the FAA. You'll need FAA approved opspecs, flight manuals, pilot training and testing, a drug test program, hazmat program, a designated safety manager, and more. Aircraft with ...


7

The carrier trains you for their aircraft. If you don't already have a type rating for your new aircraft, then you'll get one as part of the checkride at the completion of Captain training. (Maybe you flew that aircraft at another carrier, or you were an International Relief Office -- a type-rated F.O., or maybe you simply got the type rating as part of F.O....


7

Seems you guessed right, actually. FSIMS 5.9.3 does indicate that you can get a letter of authorization in lieu of a type rating: B. Requirements for Aircraft Undergoing Certification. During the type certification process, it is sometimes necessary for industry pilots or FAA inspectors with airman certification responsibility to be qualified in a ...


6

Here in the US the FAA can impose a type rating on any aircraft it likes (see part 3 below). Generally speaking type ratings are either for big planes or planes that may require additional training for safety reasons. You can find the full regulations relating to US type ratings in the FAR under §61.31 Type rating requirements, additional training, and ...


5

You would most certainly need a type rating to fly a 737. Any turbine-powered airplane or aircraft gross weight greater than 12,500 lbs (5.67 t) requires a type rating. In this case, you will need quite a bit of extra training to fly a 737 and need to pass a practical test to earn a type rating. §61.31 Type rating requirements, additional training, and ...


4

Cape air has a fleet of 83 Cessna 402s, some of which are involved in its Part 121 operation.


4

No. You'd take the same initial course as everybody else, learning that airline's procedures & checklists for that aircraft. Having a type rating shows the hiring people that you're able to pass the training course & checkride for that level of aircraft, and that's good to have. But beyond making the aircraft systems part of the syllabus easier for ...


4

Quite simply, you’d need a private pilot license and a type rating. Other posted answers are overly complicated and many rules mentioned relate to the aircraft (where and how the aircraft can be flown) and not the requirements for the pilot Further, there is no requirement to be instrument rated. Insurance of the aircraft is between you and a private ...


4

If the airplane meets the definition, which almost all multi-engine pistons will, then you can get your complex endorsement. There is even one training center that advertises getting your multi and complex at the same time. §61.1 Applicability and definitions. Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a ...


3

You are certified as a pilot to fly a certain class of airplanes. Typically, one would start with Airplane, Single Engine, Land. Then you could have more classes of airplanes added with additional training - tail draggers, floatplanes, complex (200 or more HP, retractable gear, constant speed propeller), high performance, multi-engine, etc. Then you add ...


3

There's a lot of detail and even some inconsistencies in these terms but a useful and mostly accurate starting point is: Certificates define the privileges you have as a pilot; ratings define the aircraft you can exercise (use) those privileges in. There are several types of certificate, including student, private, commercial, airline transport and flight ...


3

No, you would begin as an entry level FO with Delta. For that airline it would probably be the MD88 airplane. If you only have a type rating, in their eyes you only have enough knowledge to be dangerous. They are probably going to want real world PIC/SIC jet time in addition on the order of 500-1000 hours of it, in addition to night an instrument time. I'...


3

A U.S. pilot can apply for a SIC type rating after receiving instruction specific to that airplane to include: Operational procedures applicable to the powerplant, equipment, and systems. Performance specifications and limitations. Normal, abnormal, and emergency operating procedures. Flight manual. Placards and markings The applicant will then need ...


3

It's an ICAO requirement, basically it's just official documentation showing that you've been trained and are competent to act as SIC in a given airplane. ICAO is an organization that standardizes regulations and procedures among the participating countries (close to 200 if I recall). If you fly as SIC internationally you'll probably need an SIC type ...


3

Nope. Not unless your employer refuses to continue training. Legally all that’s required is that you have accomplished all the training required to meet the prerequisites per §61.39 and meet the practical test requirements per §61.43 plus meet the eligibility requirements for the grade of pilot certificate you are applying for per §61.103, §61.123, or §61....


2

The FAA specifies the airplanes that require a type rating in 14 CFR 61.31: Sec. 61.31 - Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements. (a) Type ratings required. A person who acts as a pilot in command of any of the following aircraft must hold a type rating for that aircraft: (1) Large aircraft (except ...


2

A PIC type supercedes and SIC type. An SIC type is really just a formalism of 121 initial first officer training to satisfy specific ICAO requirements. A typical route to an SIC type is airline ground school, FFS and then company checkride (no APD, no DE, just a check airman) and the issuance of the SIC type. If you already had a PIC type you'd go through ...


2

Aircraft such as the Piper Malibu, TBM family and the likes can only be flown under EASA rules (that superseded JAA ten years ago) with an endorsement named High Performance Aircraft. No need for a type rating. This endorsement also covers EFIS, variable pitch, retractable undercarriage endorsements.


2

In the United States, under the FAA’s pilot certification rules, per Part 61, you would need a minimum of: A Private Pilot Certificate with: Airplane Single Engine Land or Airplane Multi Engine Land, depending on the aircraft you intended to fly. A type rating on that airplane, if the airplane has a gross weight exceeding 12,500lbs or is turbojet powered, ...


2

Yes there are a couple of reality TV shows that have been done on repos. There are companies who specialize in the business, and the pilots have to be type rated where appropriate. They have to be legal to fly the airplane. It takes a special kind of risk taker pilot to do that kind of work, in view of the risks of getting into confrontations with irate ...


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