Hot answers tagged

41

I haven't spoken to any terrorists, so the only source I have for this is Bruce Schneier, but apparently, they're hard to pull off. Objectively, this makes sense; if they were easy, there would be more of them. For the sake of not referencing any actual living or dead person, let's call our supposed terrorist "Hans Gruber". Hans has enough money to charter ...


39

Yes! You can charter large aircraft like the 747. A lot of airlines offer this service for large groups (sports teams come to mind), and there are also operators of the Boeing Business Jet that were created just for private and charter uses. The TSA requires aircraft like this to adopt a security program called the Twelve-Five Standard Security Program (...


20

Private airports have very little security and light aircraft flying within a country typically aren't required to file a flightplan and aren't required to have transponders for secondary radar. You can get in a private aircraft and fly off pretty much as easily as you can get in a car and drive off. Private aircraft crossing international borders are ...


15

This is probably more a travel question than an aviation one, but I did some Googling of various aviation and travel sites and the consensus seems to be this: You can carry the scanner with you, but if you're unlucky and encounter the wrong TSA agent on the wrong day then you may be asked a lot of questions at security (the TSA's "Can I Bring..." tool seems ...


14

You need 2 things before you can start flight training in the U.S.: An appropriate visa. A tourist visa (B2), business visa (B1) or VWP (Visa Waiver Program) is not accepted TSA clearance through the Alien Flight Student Program (AFSP) The complete process is documented at the AOPA website. In a nutshell, this is what you need to do: Make sure you have a ...


8

(Answer completely rewritten based on new information) Does the TSA plan to implement rules that require every prospective student to seek pre-approval from a government agent (not just a flight school) prior to beginning flight training? Not exactly. US citizens can still start flight training whenever they want. But from April 1, 2016 pre-approval from "...


7

Short answer: Yes. Slightly longer answer: IATA changed the regulations within the 58th Edition of the Dangerous Goods Guidelines, effective January 1st, 2017. For passenger aircraft, lithium batteries are only allowed if they are installed in equipment. Standalone lithium ion cells or batteries are no longer permitted on passenger aircraft. If you want to ...


7

In the US, it's perfectly legal to bring an airband receiver or scanner through security and on to an airplane. There are restrictions on using radios (even if receive only) onboard an aircraft. Furthermore, you are required by the FAA to comply all pilot and flight attendant instructions (and they usually say turnoff all radios). There is however a ...


6

The US government would require international GA flights to land at ports of entry into the United States, designated airports which have customs personnel to meet arrivals, check passports, screen for contraband, etc. This procedure is common and said destination airports would have to be designated on the flight plan and the US dept of state notified of ...


6

An AFSP application is valid for one provider, one aircraft category (TSA category, not FAA category), and one training event (single-engine, IR or multi-engine). If you change any of those things, you need to submit a new application. If you're at a part 61 or 141 school that has multiple instructors, the approved provider is usually the school, not the ...


5

Having flight training has no effect at all on your visa status. It's actually the other way around: your visa status can determine whether or not you can have flight training. But you can definitely get flight training with an H1B. And flying has no special impact on your job: how you choose to spend your free time is none of your employer's business. ...


5

Assuming that you're in category 3 (aircraft under 12,500 lbs) then an approval is only valid for 365 days, so if you want to continue flight training after that then you need to request a new one: Once you have permission to train, you have 180 days to begin training and 365 days to complete the approved training. Both of these time periods start ...


4

As far as I can tell (and from my own experience), you don't need any TSA approval for a checkride. Looking at the regulations, 49 CFR 1552.1 defines flight training as "instruction received from a flight school" (including from individual instructors). A checkride isn't instruction, as you said, although I can't find a regulation that explicitly says that (...


4

Yes, you will need to apply for AFSP approval for your new training provider. The Application Guide for the AFSP says in step 7: It is possible for a Candidate to have several active training requests at a given time. These requests may be for the same or different flight training providers. Each training request form will be processed separately; AFSP ...


3

You are required to verify the identity of people undergoing initial Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, Private Pilot, Instrument, and Multi Engine training. Any other kind of dual instruction does not require verification of US citizenship or TSA approval of resident aliens. See 49 CFR 1552.3(h). The CFI must inspect the original documents and verify they ...


3

TSA staff actually have very little authority - they can prevent you boarding an airplane, they can stop the airplane from leaving. For everything else, they call the local police (the phone is their Big Stick - they can call in some serious assistance, like SWAT or some loaded F-22s). This sounds like a classic bureaucratic whoopsie - someone missed the ...


3

As ratchet freak pointed out you do have some more flexibility in ensuring that a small cellphone-sized explosive device is positioned to cause maximum damage if it's in your carry-on baggage as opposed to if it's in checked baggage/cargo. As such there is an inherently higher risk here. Counterbalancing that risk is the fact that we already have good ...


3

There are two different legal requirements for a citizen of a foreign country to do flight training in the United States: You require an TSA approval for each course you intend to participate in (if you for example also like to do your instrument rating in the US you need a second approval). Read more about TSAs Alien Flight Student Program on their website ...


3

You will probably need an M-1 visa for flight training, though you may also be permitted to do flight training on an F series visa (e.g. if it's in conjunction with a college aviation degree program). This is not really a TSA matter (aside from the parts relevant to the Alien Flight Student Program), but rather a State Department matter. To confirm the ...


3

For a foreigner to come to USA to learn to fly, one would need an F-1 or M-1 visa. This article in Flying magazine provides some information. You can get more information on from this school1. Also, you can look at this meta question: Can I ask about details of coming to the US to get a PPL? Update: It appears that you are already in the US on H-1b visa (...


2

I've been an avid shortwave listener since the 1950's, a ham radio operator since 1965, and I later retired as a USAF pilot. Ever since the 60's when most everything went solid state and handheld radios (both scanners and two way) started to have VHF aviation frequency, and later, UHF frequency (military aviation freqs) capability, I have always traveled ...


2

There's no formal definition or regulation that I could find; introductory flights aren't defined in 14 CFR 1.1, for example. I'm not sure why the FAA would care how often you fly with someone, or what the difference is between an introductory flight and any other flight with a non-paying, 'non-logging' passenger. The only other people who might care about ...


1

This page on the FAA website has details on getting your student pilot certificate. • Resident and US citizen student pilots follow Student Pilot’s Certificate Requirements. • Foreign student pilots (non-resident) follow the Alien Flight Student Program It appears from your question that you should follow the same procedure as US citizens. Refer ...


1

Assuming that you're a category 3 applicant, you can start training as soon as they confirm receipt of your completed application but there's no specific processing time. This is from the AFSP FAQ (direct links to FAQ items don't work): Category 3 Candidates may commence training after receiving the "Permission to Initiate Training/Fingerprint Receipt" e-...


1

Yes, you can have multiple requests open at the same time. This is from the AFSP Candidate Application Guide (step 7): It is possible for a Candidate to have several active training requests at a given time. These requests may be for the same or different flight training providers. Each training request form will be processed separately; AFSP approval is ...


1

The problem is that person writing the FAQ seems to not understand the category and class system for pilot certification. The interim final rule (the actual regulation) does not make the distinctions you have discussed from the FAQ. See https://www.flightschoolcandidates.gov/IFR_Alien_Pilot.pdf as Category 3 does not specify an FAA pilot certificate category ...


1

There is no FAR regarding intro flights for prospective student pilots. Different instructors handle things differently. I use a log sheet which was created with a spreadsheet program, which I use for student flights. It has critique blocks for different parts of the lesson, which includes preflight, engine start, take-off, medium bank turns, etc. You ...


1

Yes, every flight school change is a new request according to the AOPA FAQ for aliens. You might not need to give fingerprints but you will have to pay the 130$ registration fee again to go to a different flight school.


1

Yes you do. I've had two Germans and an Indian receive training from me while here on visas. I was freelance, and they all had to go through ASFP. There must be a new training request submitted each time a student in this situation changes training providers, and yes, I had to register with flightschoolcandidates.gov as a flight training provider and was ...


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