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-1

I think most answers has missed phugoid oscillation which is a key word here. Most general aviation airplanes are designed to be more or less stable in flight once trimmed for the actual situation. This means that if the flight is disturbed somehow, the plane most often returs to a new stable situtation. This goes for all the three inputs: roll, yaw and ...


7

Don't overthink it too much. Simplify in your mind. Trim is used to pre-set hands-off angle of attack. Static stability forces will focus on regaining the trimmed angle of attack if the plane is displaced from its trim state. Since pilots use airspeed as a proxy for angle of attack, trim sets hands-off airspeed, as far as the pilot is concerned. The best ...


6

The main purpose of the tail surface is to prevent the pitch instability of the wing from affecting the whole aeroplane. This is why it is often called the horizontal stabilizer. In the simplest case, the stabilizer exerts no lift force when the plane is in trim. If the nose lifts, the tail AoA increases and it starts to generate lift. The design is arranged ...


15

But assume, there comes a wind gust, and the angle of attack will increase. This causes the center of pressure to move forward in front of my gravity location. So the aircraft will become instable because the angle of attack will further increase (nose up). The only thing the pilot could do is to use the elevator to trim in pitch. This is not accurate. Are ...


12

I think you misunderstand how it works, and how you would respond to changes in wind. Increases in airspeed impact all flight surfaces, including the elevator, so a change in airspeed due to a gust isn't going to create large changes in pitch. There will be some change, however typically the changes in pitch would balance out with the fluctuations. It's rare ...


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