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6

There are sector maps available, and each facility updates them periodically. They are published. My understanding is that sectors are joined and separated frequently, even based on the minute to minute workload. (I have a set of charts showing High, Low Center and tracon sectors. I haven't found a public source for those charts yet. Here is a set of maps,...


4

Class B is a legal restriction for pilots. ATC has to give them clearance to enter it. It's there to protect the traffic around a busy airport from aircraft that are not being controlled by ATC. The TRACON airspace is just for controllers. Pilots aren't expected to know sector boundaries. They don't have to worry about that at all. Each controller will ...


2

An "up/down" facility is where the tower and TRACON are in the same building and most of the traffic is to/from that airport (typically one class C or TRSA), so they share the identifier. They do provide services for satellite (class D or untowered) airports, but their traffic levels are usually negligible. A "standalone" facility is where the TRACON is ...


2

I may not understand your question correctly but I think you are a little confused about Airspace here. There is no TRACON airspace. TRACON is defined here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_traffic_control#Approach_and_terminal_control A TRACON is an ATC facility usually associated with Class B airspace. Because the Class B airspace is so busy they ...


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