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3

If the glider is being towed in perfect alignment with the longitudinal axis of the tow plane and the thrust, then no - the stall speed will be the same. In reality the tow would never be perfectly aligned like that and there would be some effect on the stall speed. For instance, if the glider is low i.e. below the plane axis, there would be a downward ...


6

None The effect of the glider is purely drag, which the tow plane must compensate for with more thrust. Both aircraft lift themselves. The tow plane thrust counteracts the induced and parasitic drag of the entire flying unit. The effect on aerodynamic performance would be comparable to a twin with one engine out, or trying to fly with speed brakes open, ...


5

Looking at this question from a fundamentals of flight perspective. The airplane towing the glider would have its forces in balance as they usually would, however there is a glider in the back that is causing quite a bit of drag. Since airplanes climb due to an excess of thrust, the airplane will climb at a much lower rate. The pitch attitude would be ...


5

Well again, a glider would have zero effect on a stall speed of the tow plane, because the tow plane technically does not have a stall speed (remember wings only stall if they exceed the critical AoA - this can happen at any airspeed and/or at any flight attitude). Now most tow planes use a release hook mounted under the fuselage just aft of the tailwheel. ...


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