6

Your expectation is correct. A tilt-wing has a lower drag penalty in hover (but that's not the full picture). The XV-15 had a penalty of 635–680 kg, while a tilt-wing would have 23 kg, for the reason you mention. The sentence on Wikipedia unfortunately lacks the context of the reference (Flight), which is down for maintenance, but the web archive version is ...


4

The yaw would be accomplished by angling one rotor a little forward, and the other a little backwards. The shifting move to the side is accomplished by generating more thrust on one side. Either by increasing the rotor AOA (collective pitch) or increasing RPM. You increase the lift, until you have your desired roll angle, then you equalize the lift so you ...


4

There are 2 major problems. First is the weight you'd incur from: Extra rotors/propellers Transmission components (the V22 already has a transmission in case of an engine failure, it's already more complex than you'd ideally want but it's necessary for safety) Structural components to support the forces from the propellers and extra transmission It's ...


3

The c.g. limits change in forward and hover flight, so loading the aircraft takes special care. On the Bell XV-15, the range of c.g. was around 16 inches. For comparison, the internal cabin was 157 inches long. Based on the fuselage stations below and the image above, the c.g. limits were very close to the rotors in helicopter configuration. For the control ...


2

If we take the horizontal stabilizer as part of the fixed "wing" arrangement in horizontal flight, then for trim the CG and center of lift must always align exactly (although the rotor/propeller thrust line may affect that slightly). Stability is a bit more complicated and is not relevant to your question. The trick with a titrotor is to arrange it ...


2

What you describe is effectively a "compound helicopter" -- an inefficient design used only when you must combine hovering flight with maximum forward speed -- but with hovering managed by tilt rotors (adds complexity and weight for the shafts and transmission) and lift in forward flight handled by the fixed wings. The simple reason this hasn't ...


2

According to various bits of online documentation, the rotors have cyclic pitch control like a helicopter as well as collective pitch control like a helicopter and most high-performance propeller airplanes (often referred to as having a "variable pitch" propeller). The cyclic on the Osprey is controlled with a swashplate that apparently has only ...


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