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6

"Scheduled departure time" is not a term used in the operational environment. It is a term you will find on the passenger side of things, and means the time at which the aircraft is scheduled to leave the departure gate. There are several different operational terms related to departure time: ETD, Estimated time of departure. The estimated time at ...


1

They are both the same. That definition "ready to start/pushback" in the block quote is pretty much the same as leaving the gate, since leaving the gate is the pushback.


4

Don't overthink it. It's simple; left top (or upper), mid, and bottom (or lower), and right top (upper), mid, and bottom (lower) are perfectly clear and precise. On a biplane, just take out the mid, and on a monoplane, it's just left or right. You can substitute port for left and starboard for right, but if the audience is outside the aviation/boating ...


7

Any lateral confusion is dealt with in Ralph J's answer. The rest is straightforward: For a biplane or triplane, vertical confusion should be eliminated by the usual upper, middle, lower. Is there one uppermost wing or two? This becomes clear in context. "The wing" without further qualification means the entire primary lifting surface, whether ...


10

While boats use port & starboard, aircraft (at least in the U.S.) generally don't. "Left" and "Right" work well for most things; when talking with flight attendants (on a large aircraft), "captain's side" and "first officer's side" serve the same purpose as "port" and "starboard" (i.e. the port ...


2

Actually, in the US, the accepted term for a flight instructor by the FAA and the general aviation (not to be confused with General Aviation) public is Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI). An instructor for instrument ratings is called a Certificated Flight Instructor-Instrument (CFII). This is opposed to a Basic Ground Instructor (BGI) or an Advanced ...


5

Certified flight instructor = CFI. Add a multiengine rating to your CFI and now you are a multiengine flight instructor, or MEI. An instructor with single and multiengine instructor ratings is commonly referred to as a CFI/MEI. What if you are a CFI but only in gliders? CFI-G is the most common shorthand. Pilot authorizations are specifically called "...


0

As suggested in a comment by ASE user "nanoman", the most appropriate term appears to be "inertial speed".


0

Expanding on something suggested in a comment by ASE user "Grimm The Opiner", one might say "but she preferred to keep comms chatter to a minimum while she was slippin' the surlies..." Referencing the well-known poem High Flight by John Gillespie Magee, Jr.


0

Not a complete answer, but adding to the list: In Naval Aviation we used "feet wet" and "feet dry" to distinguish between the (generally) overland portion of a strike mission, and the enroute over-water portion transiting to and from the aircraft carrier. if you are writing about space you could use something like "weightless", ...


6

The former is correct; an F-16 climing straight up has 0 groundspeed. "Inertial velocity" would accurately describe the 3D motion you're describing.


3

As far as I know, the only other example of this flight profile in aviation is post-stall maneuvering, especially for flat spin recovery. For planes, control in these flight regimes is mainly accomplished by thrust vectoring and canard/stabilator actuation. The Starship flaps don’t match these. Another close sibling of this flight profile is the Shuttle ...


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