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GROUND LOOPS ARE EXPENSIVE ie if it gets away from you and enters a ground loop so severe that the aircraft flips and/or strikes a wing into the ground the damage both to the aircraft - and to you - will be very costly. FLY THEM UNTIL THEY STOP - maintain positive control of the aircraft throughout all ground and flight operations. This is particularly ...


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From an "aviation culture" perspective, "fly it until it stops" is still a phrase taught to student pilots to this day. It means "don't let go of the controls no matter what, act like you are in command of the aircraft until there is no more motion.". In modern times, this is taught in the context of landing in general, especially in emergency landing ...


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It is amazing to realize how much aircraft changed from 1920 to 1940, and how difficult it was to properly train people to operate the new ones (all the way to stop). A "ground loop" means exactly what it says, a very sharp turn from your intended path. Your mechanic would not be happy when the cost of damage to struts, wheel bearings, tires, and other ...


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Positioning flights do not have to be approved, whereas ferry flights have to be approved by the FAA by permit or operations specifications. Due to the nature of ferry flights only required crew and or mechanics my fly on the aircraft due to airworthiness limitations.


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Ground loops are costly. Fly them until they stop. What this literally says: Ground loops are costly. Fly the ground loops until they stop. What they meant to say: Ground loops are costly. Fly the airplane until it stops. Some background to why this was was important, not an answer to the question really... From personal experience (twice) it is ...


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"maintain directional control until you've stopped." In aviation, a ground loop is a rapid rotation of a fixed-wing aircraft in the horizontal plane (yawing) while on the ground. Aerodynamic forces may cause the advancing wing to rise, which may then cause the other wingtip to touch the ground. In severe cases (particularly if the ground surface is soft),...


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It just means "pay attention to what you are doing" until you are no longer moving. "Fly them" means "keep actively controlling the plane as if you were still in the air". Don't start daydreaming just because you're on the ground, in other words. Especially with the taildraggers of olden times; They are dynamically unstable turning-wise while rolling ...


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It means that even if you've put the wheels on the ground, you still need to "fly" the plane (meaning using control surfaces such as rudder/aileron/elevator) to maintain directional control until you've stopped.


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"Wheel pants" is a common term for these wheel fairings, at least in US usage, which serve to reduce drag. They have also been called "spats", though that term has traditionally been reserved for something much larger, at least in US usage. Related -- How can drag induced by the landing gear be reduced?? -- see all answers What is "spatted ...


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Those are called speed fairings. They make the shape over the tire more aerodynamic and reduce drag, thus increasing airspeed and fuel efficiency. This is a page in a Cessna 172R information manual that comments on the differences in performance when they are installed.


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The action of a ground spoiler is essentially that of a lift dumper, which also acts as an airbrake. As far as I am aware there is no special term for an aileron which also performs this function. Several Airbus types use the technique but their literature just calls them ailerons. On the A380 at least the spoiler action is initiated by the Speed Brake ...


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If you are asking about the forces involved in an uncoordinated turn, Thrust, Drag, Lift, and Load (weight) still apply. But, let us define Lift as acting perpendicular to to the wings in a direction opposite Load. While Load is acting perpendicular to the wings in the direction of gravity plus the aircraft’s momentum. When you are banked, or you are in a ...


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It's important not to overthink it. I'll keep it simple. A coordinated turn means you are keeping the tail lined up with the nose in the airstream. If you are uncoordinated, you are flying sideways in the airstream to some degree or another; the side of the fuselage is being presented to the airflow. If you learn to fly in gliders, it's obvious because ...


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Can someone tell me which force during an uncoordinated turn is too big or too small and literally what makes a turn uncoordinated in terms of forces? The slip-skid ball (inclinometer ball) will be off-center whenever the component of the net aerodynamic force that we see when looking at the airplane in a head-on view is tilted "sideways" in the ...


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It isn't all that difficult if you understand the three different axis, and the corresponding rotation about each axis. (roll, pitch, and yaw) In your question you described a coordinated turn. (no slip or skid) An uncoordinated turn is simply when there IS slip or skid. This occurs where there is either not enough, or too much yaw. This happens when ...


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Before the September 1993 transition to the "alphabet system", "transition area" was used to describe areas where the floor of controlled airspace was higher than the surface, but lower than 14,500 MSL base of the "Continental Control Area", at least in cases where those areas were designated around airports and along approaches to airports, rather than ...


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The term "glider" has many usages. It can mean any unpowered object, from lizards to underwater craft, supported by wings and able to convert part of its downward motion into significant forward motion. Most commonly it describes any unpowered fixed-wing aircraft, some of which have quite steep and short flight paths. The more streamlined gliders can soar, ...


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"Glider" is the broader term, including everything that would normally be described as a "sailplane", and also including many other aircraft such as troop-carrying assault gliders, and ultra-low-performance training gliders like "primary" trainers and training gliders adapted from light airplanes such as the Piper TG-8, and rocket-powered gliders such as the ...


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From the FAA Glider Flying Handbook, pages 1-3 and 1-4: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) defines a glider as a heavier-than-air aircraft that is supported in flight by the dynamic reaction of the air against its lifting surfaces, and whose free flight does not depend principally on an engine. ... Another widely accepted term in the ...


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a magneto is a coil that reacts to a magnet fitted on the shaft in order to generate electricity for the spark plugs alone. is already set and timed for spark. it is redundant for this reason and independent of the alternator that generates auxiliary electrical power. is a vital component meant to still maintain spark power for emergency situations, but not ...


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It's named for one of its founders William E. Boeing which is the American spelling of his father's German surname "Böing". To answer the question directly: it does not mean anything in particular.


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You know, in a gasoline engine, we're putting gasoline and air into a cylinder in the engine, and then stuff happens, and plane goes zoom. Well, the gas and air won't light itself on fire; it must be lit by something, and at a very specific time. So, it uses a spark of electricity, in a "spark plug". This shot of electricity is made the old ...


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It means the profile is based on descending at 0.78 Mach until the IAS increases to 280 knots, at which point that speed is maintained to 10,000', at which point the aircraft slows to 250 knots for the remainder of the descent until it's time to slow & configure for landing. That 0.78/280/250 is a very standard profile for descent planning in the 737, ...


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Green Dot (GD) speed is a term used by Airbus. It is named after the symbol on the speed tape. It refers to the speed that results in the best climb gradient in case of an engine failure, but it is close the speed resulting in best L/D ratio with all engines operating. Airbus defines it as follows: Definition GD speed is the engine-out operating ...


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The distinction between STOVL and V/STOL is largely a matter of naming. As it stands, no one has operationally deployed an aircraft that can land vertically, but cannot take off vertically. All modern aircraft referred to as STOVL or V/STOL are, in technical terms, VTOL-capable aircraft. Designating them V/STOL was a matter of reminding that they can ...


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To put it simply, it's about the ability to take of vertically at any mass: V/STOL aircraft can take off fully loaded (max. operational weight). STOVL aircraft does not have sufficient engine thrust to take off vertically at any weight, and at higher T/O weights it must have some lift from wings to assist the T/O. It may be able take off vertically at less ...


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A mag is in effect a completely self-contained old-style generator/points/coil/distributor ignition system all crammed into a housing the size of two blocks of butter. The drive off the engine accessory case spins an internal permanent magnet a/c generator, which energizes the primary windings of a built-in ignition coil, whose electromagnetic field is ...


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A magneto is a gear driven electric generation device connected to the crankshaft of the engine. It supplies the ignition system (spark plugs) with power. Each engine has two magnetos. Each cylinder has two plugs. Each magneto supplies one plug in each of the cylinders. This makes the ignition system redundant. If a magneto fails, the other magneto can ...


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According to Wikipedia, Haifa Airport's runway is currently 1318m long, with plans to extend it by 316m to 1634m. None of those numbers match your question. The terms "gross" and "net" aren't used in this context, but we do talk about "total" and "available" (or "usable") length, which could just be a translation issue. Runways often have a "displaced ...


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Gross and net are not aviation terms for runways. Many runways have extra space on either end to be used as stopways, giving extra stopping distance in case of an overrun. I'm going to hazard a guess and say that the gross length is the total paved area of the runway and the net length is between the thresholds that is usable for takeoffs and landings.


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