38

People like to classify things, to divide them into categories. Categorizing allows people to get an initial broad understanding of a complicated subject more quickly. It is therefore very useful for purposes such as marketing and articles aimed for people who aren't necessarily subject matter experts. However, classification is necessarily a crude tool ...


33

Until 2016 Boeing included customer codes into the aircraft model names. Your example 747-830 decodes as follows: 747: This is the general aircraft series. -8: The 747-8 variant (in this case, a 747-8I, where I is for Intercontinental, the passenger variant). 30: The customer code for Lufthansa or Condor Flugdienst (see e.g. Wikipedia for a list of customer ...


14

RAVNN (Pronounced Raven) is the name of a waypoint in Maryland. From the FAA Fixes / Waypoints directory RAVNN MARYLAND BAL*C*174.00/22.98 OTT*C*070.89/12.17 ENO*C*250.66/53.40 DCA*D*106.56 38-48-15.9900N 076-31-04.9100W 38°48'15.9900N 76°31'04.9100W(Google Maps link) is east of Washington.


14

Different ATC facilities need a standardized way to manage handoff of traffic between them and make sure traffic headed in different directions doesn't conflict at the border, especially at the interface between Approach/Departure and Center where traffic is climbing or descending and therefore can't be separated by cruise altitude like en route traffic can. ...


14

To be clear, there is no “generation” classification for fighters. This was a marketing gimmick cooked up by defense OEMs to move hardware and keep Congress from axing pet projects. The generation thing appears in the 1990s in Lockheed Martin literature about the F-22, which at the time was in danger of being stillborne. Nobody referred to the ATF program,...


11

Yes, a Boeing 747-830 exists. There are a variety of codes for airplanes, one of the most common being the ICAO code. It lists the latest model of the 747 as B748. However, Boing uses an additional, airline-specific code. The number 30 is given to Lufthansa and Condor, so the 747-8 in Lufthansa layout is the 747-830.


10

While boats use port & starboard, aircraft (at least in the U.S.) generally don't. "Left" and "Right" work well for most things; when talking with flight attendants (on a large aircraft), "captain's side" and "first officer's side" serve the same purpose as "port" and "starboard" (i.e. the port ...


9

RAVNN is a waypoint on the RAVNN6 STAR (page 1, page 2) for KBWI and surrounding airports, which is handled by Potomac Approach.


8

I'm not sure if there is really an industry wide standard for the date format, but at least the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) uses the YYMMDD date format for flight plans: DOF/ The date of flight departure in a six figure format (YYMMDD, where YY equals the year, MM equals the month and DD equals the day). (FAA on ICAO flight plans) ...


8

"Scheduled departure time" is not a term used in the operational environment. It is a term you will find on the passenger side of things, and means the time at which the aircraft is scheduled to leave the departure gate. There are several different operational terms related to departure time: ETD, Estimated time of departure. The estimated time at ...


7

As you can see from the Wikipedia chart, the fact that the definitions vary depending on the publication means it's all just a kind of a construct in the minds of the ones who created it. In the end it's just a historical mental exercise with no particular applicability other than to be a useful shorthand when making a historical description of design over ...


7

Any lateral confusion is dealt with in Ralph J's answer. The rest is straightforward: For a biplane or triplane, vertical confusion should be eliminated by the usual upper, middle, lower. Is there one uppermost wing or two? This becomes clear in context. "The wing" without further qualification means the entire primary lifting surface, whether ...


6

Depends a bit on where the date is used. For flightplans, the Date Of Flight (DOF) should be inserted in item 18 in the format YYMMDD (for example 200816 for the 16th of August 2020). In a NOTAM, a format similar to the DOF flightplan format is used, but usually with the addition of four digits to indicate the time (HHMM): C0424/20 NOTAMN Q) EKDK/QWGLW/IV/M /...


6

The former is correct; an F-16 climing straight up has 0 groundspeed. "Inertial velocity" would accurately describe the 3D motion you're describing.


5

In many parts of the world, the military has reserved large parts of airspace for military activities. As a rule of thumb, civilian traffic is not permitted in these areas. Traditionally, such military areas were reserved 24/7, regardless of whethere there actually was any military activity at a given time. This is not very efficient, as it forces civilian ...


5

Although my aviation knowledge is not all encompassing, I would argue that you, your boss, and your software company may want to know your audience as well as possible. The same terminology can mean different things to different segments of society. For instance, uncontrolled airspace/airfield would mean something totally different to a pilot than it would ...


5

It's an easy way to know what configuration options "this" aircraft has, long after it has left the factory. Let's say that airline 1 ordered a bunch of 737's with one cockpit jumpseat & two aircraft batteries and the 3-hour cargo fire suppression option -- stuff you might expect for overwater flights. They got, hypothetically, the 737-7E1 (...


5

Certified flight instructor = CFI. Add a multiengine rating to your CFI and now you are a multiengine flight instructor, or MEI. An instructor with single and multiengine instructor ratings is commonly referred to as a CFI/MEI. What if you are a CFI but only in gliders? CFI-G is the most common shorthand. Pilot authorizations are specifically called "...


4

Generally, the idea is that a waypoint has a five letter or six letter code that is unique (within the region) easy to remember easy to pronounce as a word hard to confuse In this case, the code of the waypoint is RAVNN, but it is pronounced "raven", because that is much faster to say, much easier to remember, and just as easy to understand as "Romeo Alpha ...


4

The correct term is a Route Segment. CFR 14 part 1 describes a Route Segment as a portion of a route bounded on each end by a fix or navigation aid (NAVAID). If the flight is in a straight line from one point to the next, it is said to be "Direct". From a common usage standpoint, DJClayworth is correct in that a "leg" is used to describe a section of a ...


4

Don't overthink it. It's simple; left top (or upper), mid, and bottom (or lower), and right top (upper), mid, and bottom (lower) are perfectly clear and precise. On a biplane, just take out the mid, and on a monoplane, it's just left or right. You can substitute port for left and starboard for right, but if the audience is outside the aviation/boating ...


3

As per the FAA Procedures for Handling Airspace Matters: Transitional areas, Class E, are designated to serve terminal and en route aircraft to include helicopter operations such as: a. Transitioning to/from terminal and en route. b. Transiting between airways and routes. c. En route climbs or descents. d. Holding. e. Radar vectors. f. Providing for course ...


3

Without delving into too much detail, the most appropriate pilot terms for the straight legs of the search grid you describe would be “track”, or “course”. Both terms are essentially interchangeable, and are often modified to “ground track” and “true/magnetic course” for clarity.


3

This is a partial answer (allowed) that I'm making a community wiki. Source: Google Ngram Viewer The usage above shows that the term base leg came after traffic pattern, which was confirmed in a Flying Magazine issue (Jun 1948, p. 64): That linked issue shows that the base leg was also known as the crosswind leg (which today is the leg after the first turn ...


3

In the world of idealized navigation, a journey consists of flying a straight line from your departure point to another location, making a turn and flying a straight line to a different point, and so on until you reach the point that is your destination. Reality is a bit more complicated, but it's a useful approximation. The points are called "waypoints" ...


3

Running torque is also called the "friction torque". It's the torque required to make the nut or bolt turn while the nut is "loose" you might say. With a locking nut, the locking feature (normally either a plastic insert, or a distorted bore section of the threads that directly squeezes together on them) takes a certain amount of effort to overcome. Since ...


3

In that context I believe it actually refers to the "approach gate". This is from the FAA Instrument Procedures Handbook, Chapter 4: The approach gate is an imaginary point used within ATC as a basis for vectoring aircraft to the final approach course. The gate is established along the final approach course one mile from the FAF on the side away ...


3

From 14 CFR 1.1: Helicopter means a rotorcraft that, for its horizontal motion, depends principally on its engine-driven rotors. Rotorcraft means a heavier-than-air aircraft that depends principally for its support in flight on the lift generated by one or more rotors. Aircraft means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air. A ...


3

As far as I know, the only other example of this flight profile in aviation is post-stall maneuvering, especially for flat spin recovery. For planes, control in these flight regimes is mainly accomplished by thrust vectoring and canard/stabilator actuation. The Starship flaps don’t match these. Another close sibling of this flight profile is the Shuttle ...


3

Wake is the general term for air disturbed by a passing aircraft, as might be guessed from the word's nautical origins. Vortex (in aviation, usually a wingtip vortex) is a part of the wake that originates at the tip of a surface that has a pressure differential. It's the preferred term in scholarly writing. Eddy by now seems to be restricted to the name of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible