Hot answers tagged

79

At uncontrolled airports, there is rarely enough traffic for signals to be needed, and pilots should (though are not required to) communicate with each other on CTAF—an option that cars do not have. In the air, if you're close enough to see a turn signal, you are way too close and need to immediately follow the collision avoidance procedure. More generally, ...


52

I think the points raised in other answers are good, but they miss the essential difference. Cars choose from a discrete set of options, but planes do not. When you indicate left when driving you are communicating to other traffic that either you are taking the next left turn, or that you're changing lanes (depending on context). In some situations the exact ...


17

Aircraft have radios with which to communicate their intent. Cars do not. Pilots should be utilizing these radios even at uncontrolled airfields. A good mantra to have is that there are no uncontrolled airfields. Just pilot-controlled airfields. I will communicate my intent on the Common Traffic Advisory Frequency before entering the movement area of any ...


9

Airplanes don't coordinate visually because they can't The other answers are correct, but they all seem to miss an important point: airplanes barely see each other! Because (and in contrast to e.g. cars): they can be anywhere in 3D, not just 2D on specific streets they are incredibly fast (think of at least 2x the speed of a car on the highway) they are ...


7

The reason for using taxiway C is described in the Low Visibility Procedures from the AIP: 4.4.4 At present, TWY ‘C’ and Stand no 11 to 14 are equipped with CAT IIIB lighting system as per short term interim plansubmitted to DGCA by AAI and agreed to by DGCA vide letter no. AV.20015/09/08-AL dated 15-07-2014. Therefore, duringCAT IIIA and CAT IIIB ...


6

If that was the exact phraseology, "papa" is the latest ATIS they've copied. (ATIS being a continuous broadcast of recorded aeronautical information, updated every half hour, or in case of a major change). Listen to arrival ATIS Heathrow, and, at the very end, note the instruction to inform Heathrow on first contact. Similarly, here's departure ...


3

The difference would be from fuel burned during taxi, which is generally a very small fraction of the total fuel, so the impact on CG would be tiny. And, since burning fuel tends to bring the CG more into, rather than out of, limits, the "who cares" impact is essentially nil.


3

There are pretty strict rules on how planes should travel on the ground. They are generally directed by ground control in the tower, and if they come upon another plane there are guidelines to who has right of way, and unlike car drivers, pilots generally know and follow the rules.


2

No, lack of a centerline stripe doesn't restrict a controller from assigning that routing, nor does it restrict a pilot from turning there. The stripe might be omitted because "that" turn wasn't anticipated to be used often, but the stripes (or lack thereof) carry no regulatory authority.


2

There are savings beyond just fuel when using a electric taxi motor on a commercial aircraft. Your title seems to ask about this but the text asks only about fuel. WheelTug, a developer of an electric taxi system, answers both in a pretty thorough presentation. Direct cost savings per flight is about 210 dollars, most of which is avoidance of pushback tug ...


2

More related information about ATIS: ATIS is renewed periodically, and "named" sequentially with ICAO alphabet (alfa, bravo, charlie etc.). The reason for informing ATC which ATIS you have copied is that sometimes the ATIS changes after pilot has received it , and changes may contain useful information for pilot (in the question pilot had listened ...


1

Great answer above. Acceleration also plays a negligible task regarding this as fractions of fuel are forced to settle backward in each fuel tank; this somethimes causes more noticeable spills under the wing of some overfilled airliners only when they start to roll for take off - as fuel is forced backwards and follows the trailing edge swept angle outwards ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible