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56 votes
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How can Ural Airlines fly an A320 from an unpaved field after an emergency landing?

TLDR: cold winter will freeze the ground and make it hard enough. First, there was a similar case of Alrosa flight 514 that landed on a disused runway in Izhma in September 2010, was fixed and flew to ...
culebrón's user avatar
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23 votes

When, if any case, can it be considered justifiable to reject a takeoff after V1 speed, if the aircraft is incapable of taking off?

If the aircraft is truly incapable of taking off -- the locked controls case, let's say -- then the only choice involved is along the lines of, go off the end of the runway really really fast (you ...
Ralph J's user avatar
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21 votes
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Could a VTOL aircraft use a helipad for landing/taking off?

Not necessarily The two key elements are aircraft mass, and how that mass is kept aloft. You can probably get a Chinook onto the landing pad of a cruise liner, but you would want to check first if the ...
GremlinWranger's user avatar
17 votes
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How should you deal with passenger throttle interference just after take-off?

You did about as well as you could in the circumstances. People tend to pull their legs back because they're afraid of interfering with the rudder pedals. In your briefing, you don't want to freak out ...
John K's user avatar
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16 votes
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May two airplanes wait on the same runway at the same time?

Yes, this is permitted. "Intersection" refers to the position on the runway of an aircraft which will not use full length for their departure. Per the .65, there are restrictions to this ...
randomhead's user avatar
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8 votes

How can Ural Airlines fly an A320 from an unpaved field after an emergency landing?

Update - it didn't work :-( News reports as of January 12th 2024 say: "Ural Airlines has decided to dismantle its stranded A320 in a field in Siberia, instead of trying to retrieve it. The plane ...
Russell McMahon's user avatar
7 votes

Could a VTOL aircraft use a helipad for landing/taking off?

You mention air forces but don't specifically restrict the question to current military types, so considering commercial VTOL aircraft this is exactly what Joby and other air taxi companies are ...
Pilothead's user avatar
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7 votes
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How can the wing generate more lift than the thrust?

A wing's shape allows it to deflect a large volume of air downwards while incurring a small amount of drag, which in turn means a relatively small amount of thrust (compared to the weight of the plane)...
ThatCoolCoder's user avatar
4 votes

How can the wing generate more lift than the thrust?

Just to complement a bit the other answers. How can the wing generate more lift than the thrust? The question is based on the false premises that: lift is always much bigger than thrust; and lift ...
sophit's user avatar
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4 votes

How can the wing generate more lift than the thrust?

Lift is produced when the wings push air down. Doing so inevitably involves some drag that would tend to slow the airplane down or force it to lose altitude. The engine only needs to provide enough ...
Chris's user avatar
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4 votes

How should you deal with passenger throttle interference just after take-off?

Aviate, navigate, communicate. I'm sure in that moment you had some very spicy communication you wanted to make to that passenger. However, communication is #3 on that list. Only after the airplane ...
Harper - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes

What is the difference between gross weight and MTOW in an aircraft specification?

The gross weight is the current total weight of the aircraft. It is basically the value a scale would show when putting the aircraft on it. It obviously changes all the time, e.g. when payload (...
Bianfable's user avatar
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4 votes
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Should you line-up the runway 90 degrees or follow the yellow marking?

Here's a commercial aviation response, but almost certainly applicable to general aviation, too. Take-off distances are commonly measured from the threshold or, for intersections, the downwind edge of ...
Cpt Reynolds's user avatar
  • 4,807
2 votes

EOSID - Adhere to at or soon after V1?

V1 should be calculated based on the actual conditions, so if you have an unbalanced field available, that's what it should be calculated from. The V1 speed itself has zero effect on obstacle ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.8k
2 votes

What would happen if both engines of a twinjet cut out at or immediately after V1?

Basically, yes. You will get on the brakes and hope for the best. If the runway is 10000 ft and your accelerate stop distance at max thrust is 7000, no problem. If the runway is marginal, or you are ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
2 votes

Help me understand the A220-100 takeoff chart

Performance is all dependent upon aircraft gross takeoff weight, runway conditions (e.g. surface type, gradient, etc.), ambient winds and density altitude at the airfield. There is no one required ...
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
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2 votes

How can the wing generate more lift than the thrust?

You are able to pull a sled or a cart way heavier than yourself, uphill, pulling it with a force lower than its weigth. Of course, if the path is way too much inclined, you will fail. It is the ...
fraxinus's user avatar
  • 1,543
2 votes

AirBus A380 and Boeing 747 - fuel consumption while taking off?

This video shows the A380 engine instruments during takeoff. There are differences between engines but they average about 8700 kg/hr per engine, or 34,800 kg/hr total (9.7 kg/s, or 12.1 L/s, or 3.2 ...
fooot's user avatar
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1 vote

AirBus A380 and Boeing 747 - fuel consumption while taking off?

With a quite good approximation it can be shown that a jetliner typically consumes fuel for around 3% of its MTOW during warmup, taxing and take off. This percentage corresponds to around 17'250kg for ...
sophit's user avatar
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1 vote

Are declared distances absolute or just for reference?

Welcome to Aviation Stack Exchange. The pilot has the option to use an intersection takeoff versus using the full length available for takeoff provided there is enough runway available from that ...
wbeard52's user avatar
  • 12.7k
1 vote

Helicopter attitude during take-off and landing (wheels, not skids)

In a conventional helicopter (main rotor plus tail rotor) the main rotor is normally tilted some 3 to 5° forward. This is done in order to give the thrust a forward component which partially ...
sophit's user avatar
  • 13.6k
1 vote
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Helicopter attitude during take-off and landing (wheels, not skids)

Helicopters with wheels tend to be the heavier ones, whose downwash while hovering near the ground is strong enough to be dangerous ("goes out and up hundreds of feet and can easily overturn ...
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar
1 vote

Should you line-up the runway 90 degrees or follow the yellow marking?

Places I used to operate from were generally quite busy (GA and otherwise). That necessitated taking into account the often long queue of planes behind you, so the lineup was done in about 60 degrees ...
Jpe61's user avatar
  • 29.1k
1 vote

How do I calculate FPNM for standard take-off minimums?

To convert Feet per minute to feet per nautical mile you must divide the climb rate by your ground speed. $$ \frac{625 FPM}{(79 KIAS / 60)} = 474 FPNM (nowind) $$ Conversely, you can use the table in ...
wbeard52's user avatar
  • 12.7k
1 vote

Could an aircraft be tied down, then throttle up and release for takeoff in order to use a shorter runway?

Yes. For example, this F-104C was chained to a truck full of weights, throttled up, and released to set a time-to-altitude record, at Edwards AFB on 1959 Dec 14. Photo and details from here.
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar

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