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13

The NOTAM format is from the time when people still would call the value of individual bits over a phone line. Ok, that may not have happened, but my point is that data transfer was incredibly slow compared to current day standards. Therefore a compact format saved significant transmission time and cost without losing any information. The format didn't ...


11

Complete, unless you want to know the height of base of those TCU's! The bulk of the information you're after can be found in AIS-GEN 3.5 Section 10.17 - AUTO METAR coding In describing the coding used by automated systems, it gives this example NNNhhh/// Cloud detected, but it is unknown whether it is a convective cloud type (ie TCU or CB) And this ...


5

PROB40 is targeted only on the immediate TEMPO group. If there are several PROB/TEMPOs both keywords must be repeated every time. Also, PROB is never associated with BECMG or FM groups, which indicate permanent change.


5

According to NOAA, there should be a space between the whole and fractional parts. But they would never use a fractional part greater than 1, so your example must be a typo and should have read "1 1/2SM".


5

ICAO is offering a very nice API for retrieval of, for example, aerodrome names/ICAO codes and NOTAM's. It is currently in public beta, which means that it is free to use. Once they finish testing it, there will be some kind of cost involved, but they have not published any pricing details yet. You can find it here: https://www.icao.int/safety/iStars/Pages/...


4

This isn't much of an explanation, but the National Weather Service says: The international TAF also contains forecast temperature, icing, and turbulence. These three elements are not included in National Weather Service (NWS) prepared TAFs. The U.S. has no requirement to forecast temperatures in an aerodrome forecast That sounds to me like "we don'...


4

It means that the report is from an automated weather station and information from sensors are not available for visibility etc. From AIP Australia: 12.20.1 A report from a fully automated AWS that does not include information from sensors for visibility, weather or cloud will report ////, // or ////// respectively in lieu of these parameters. For this ...


3

I'm a UK PPL of 14 years, I fly out of North Weald which is on the opposite side on London to Farnborough, so I'm well placed to give you some tips here. First, use the Met Office aviation portal for your planning, most of the services a PPL will use are free. Metars are useless for planning as they only say how the weather is right now, TAFs are good for ...


3

Usually, when we translate TAFs we use the word expect. So, in this case, we expect the visibility to drop from 600m to 150m. So when planning a flight you would use 150m. Also, I find it odd how the time format is different to what I am used to. At my local airport, this is the TEMPO in the TAF. TEMPO 0302/0307 6000 SHRA SCT030TCU So this would translate....


3

TEMPO means that there were be fluctuations in the weather in the time period specified, lasting as long as 50% of the time range specified. TEMPO 0406 0150 FG VV001 means that in the period between 04:00 and 06:00 UTC the visibility will at some point go down to 150 in heavy fog, and it could last up to an hour in total. One thing I would point out is that ...


2

As I understand your question is mainly about line E of a NOTAM, right? Well, this one is in fact meant to use 'plain' English language, in contrast to all other lines, where location and reach as well as type and urgency and duration is encoded. Just, as it already has been mentioned, NOTAMs originate in a time when transmission speed was unimaginable slow ...


2

1 - It's always been done that way. 2 - You'd be surprised how many government computer systems are still using ancient hardware and operating systems.


2

First you will need to learn to decode the TAF's validity period. TAF YMAY 022230Z 0300/0312 35010KT CAVOK FM030800 31018KT 9999 SHRA BKN025 OVC100 INTER 0308/0312 31020G40KT 3000 +TSRA BKN010 SCT040CB RMK FM030600 MOD TURB BLW 5000FT T 23 24 28 33 Q 1012 1013 1014 1009 The validity of this TAF (in bold) is formatted as ddhh/ddhh. Validity period of ...


2

You can find a nice set of APIs at: https://developer.laminardata.aero/documentation/notamdata/v2


2

I am a private pilot with just VFR rating. I check many weather sites before I make a decision as to is it ok for me to fly or not. I call 800-WXbrief, which for US is a very good source, too. I also have developed friendships with many instructors who have been flying to airports of my potential destinations for many years. I ask them about weather ...


1

METAR The METAR always refers to a specific airport and is obtained right then and there. That is at the airport. It is a report of current conditions, usually hourly. In the US, the FAA polls all systems remotely and disseminates the reports in METAR format. No word on wether this is via phone, mobile or radio, if that is what you are asking. In ...


1

For the current format, it was 1993 when it was standardized. On July 1, 1993, a new, revised Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) format and code replaced the existing TAF code. This new code is in effect in most countries. The exceptions are the United States and Canada. These two countries issue Terminal Forecasts for domestic use and TAFs for the ...


1

There used to be a good technical reason (transmission time over low-rate modems), so everyone learned how to decode things. That original reason has long since gone away, but nearly everyone affected has already learned the code, so the short-term benefits of changing are minimal--and accrue mainly to new entrants (who have little/no power) whereas the ...


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