33

The FAA doesn't consider adding oil to be maintenance. The Hochberg (2016) interpretation says: The subject of adding oil is often debated; however, we note that it is not an item included in part 43, appendix A, paragraph (c), which lists items the FAA considers to be preventive maintenance. Also see the FAA's Flight Standards Information Management ...


32

The objective is very important. You don't build an airplane because you want one faster or cheaper. Neither is the case. The kit won't be cheaper, and it'll take 1 to 2 thousand manhours, minimum, of your time (take the building time claim of any kit and double or triple it to get reality). You build one for the experience of building one. A lot of ...


29

14 CFR Part 61.39 (a)(5) states that you can not take a checkride in the US until you are of age to hold the desired certificate. (5) Meet the prescribed age requirement of this part for the issuance of the certificate or rating sought; Sorry. I encourage you to take as many mock-checkrides as possible in the meantime. Also, in addition to mock-checkrides. ...


22

The FAA allows pilots to do maintenance themselves. It’s outlined in the following doc from the FAA as well as the full regulation here. I would say engine oil falls under: Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.


19

The trick my CFI taught me is to use your Course Deviation Indicator or ADF to keep track of landings. After your first landing, bug a course of 010. After your second landing, bug 020. You can reach over and adjust the knob after every landing without having to juggle a pen and a notebook. It's still a manual step, though. You could also use a product like ...


16

The other answers have provided some easy ways to increment your count without too much distraction, but if you are really "prone to forget [...] when things get busy" as you say, this might not be good enough. I would therefore recommend a solution which does not require any action on your side. Most smartphones today have a pressure sensor. There ...


14

The big disadvantages of a kit: it will take you years to have an airplane ready to fly, and you'll be flying an airplane built by a novice builder. The main advantage of a kit: you (often) don't need all the money up front. Buy the fuselage kit, build it. Then buy the wing kit, and build that. Not all kit planes are sold this way, but several are. No ...


14

You are sort of correct. For the ground instruction for your basic Private Pilot Certificate, it would not really matter. For the actual flight instruction, the CFI has to be certificated for the category and class of aircraft in which you are being trained by them. If the aircraft is a taildragger, high performance, and/or complex aircraft, the CFI will ...


13

Get a Tally Counter, and push the button once per landing. No batteries, nothing to fail, easy to use. Not much more you could ask for. https://tallycounterstore.com/finger-tally-counter-quantity-discounts/ There are even options for mounted ones. https://tallycounterstore.com/mounted-tally-counter/


13

No, you cannot. Just like an ASEL doesn't give you the ability to fly an AMEL, if you have an AMEL that doesn't give you ASEL privileges. Adding the ASEL shouldn't be that hard though, especially if you've done a majority of your training in one. You will still need to take a check ride.


12

The other answers are good, there's a couple of aspects that haven't been covered that I'll touch on in my answer. Safety: Kitplanes have a higher rate of accidents overall than certified airplanes. There's a good article from kitplanes magazine that breaks down causes, it's not authoritative but it's extremely useful in showing the differences in accidents ...


11

You will need to take a checkride with a DPE (or FAA inspector) to be able to be pilot-in-command in an ASEL airplane. Since your license is AMEL only that is the only category and class or aircraft you can be pilot-in-command. The answer is found in the Private Pilot ACS page A-12. You hold a AMEL rating and so you follow the AMEL column for the tasks that ...


7

I can't find a reference to link, but in the transport world, adding oil comes under the category of "replenishment", and is the same as adding fuel or topping off a reservoir that is crew-accessible. Many corporate aircraft have oil replenishment systems for servicing engine oil, intended to be usable by the flight crew. On the CRJ regional ...


7

(Disclaimer: I'm not a pro at all, I don't even have any license yet) If you do indeed have a smartphone with you, you might consider just letting a voice recording run for the duration of your pattern work and call out your landings. When you're back on the ground, you can just listen through the recording and count the landings. This might also have ...


5

To answer the question, no. You cannot fly friends and family in a SEL aircraft if your pilot certificate says MEL. To add SEL, talk to your local FSDO about the requirements. You can certainly get it with a checkride, but there may be another option... It might be different with just a private certificate, but I was an ATP Multi engine only, and had ...


4

While the aircraft that you buy could conceivably require your CFI to possess certain additional ratings, such as if you purchase a twin-engine plane or a jet, most smaller, single-engine, prop planes will be covered under your CFI’s Single Engine Land (SEL) rating.


4

Of which type of pilot are you asking: Student Military Private (hobbyist) Corporate Airline I will be using the term licensed to loosely mean certificated, current, and proficient with the proper endorsements and documentations. The short answer is no. They are not obliged/obligated to fly the same aircraft. The pilot can choose to fly in any aircraft ...


3

Necro-ing this question to give a more forceful opinion of "OP was not wrong." First, like GreenAsJade said, tower didn't yell at you in the moment. This is not incontrovertible evidence of legality or correctness, but it's a pretty strong piece of evidence. More importantly, "report three miles out" is not a standard pattern entry. Here ...


3

You have a bit of a misconception about the way these things work. Everyone gets a student pilot's license before they get a private pilot's license. The student license is just a step along the way to the private license. The requirements for getting a student pilot's license are minimal. It's the equivalent of a "learner's permit" in the automobile ...


3

Almost every calculator can be converted into counter just by typing something like 1 + = (and then every time you press = the value is incremented). This can be used if you need aircraft instruments for the training itself instead.


3

If you have ready access to university, do the degree first. You won't have time later, and if you get a pilot job in future and lose your medical for whatever reason, you will have an education to fall back on. In any case, the aviation industry is going to take a number of years to recover from this whole "plague" fiasco, so you shouldn't be in ...


3

Pace count beads, which are just some beads on a rope that doesn't let them readily move, would work well if you want to keep track while in the air.


3

Yes, but. With one notable exception, for any pilot to legally fly an aircraft, they must be rated for that category and class of aircraft. Some (generally larger) types of aircraft also require a type rating. So, if you purchased a Cessna 172 (a very common primary trainer), your CFI would need to be rated for Airplane category, Single Engine Land class (...


2

I'm not a pilot, though I am an aviation enthusiast, and here are some of the pros/cons that have not been mentioned yet. Kit plane pros: Kit planes have experimental classification, which means you can add non-certified parts to the aircraft. This can be especially beneficial for things like exterior lights since non-aircraft LED headlights are cheaper and ...


2

It's one of those things about the flying game that the actual details of previous education and experience outside of aviation count for relatively little, other than what they may indicate about someone's personality, worldview and leadership potential going forward. This is because the knowledge base and skill set are unique to the trade. I used to know ...


2

I use my ADF. Set the frequency to 1000 when I start, bump it by one for each landing. (Might as well use it for SOMETHING!)


2

Easy, peasy. Fill out a label/sticker with the endorsement printed on it. Then, all you have to do is sign it and place your CFI number on it. You can then either scan it or take a photo of it. Your student can upload the scanned document or photo into an electronic logbook. If they do not have an electronic logbook, they can print out the endorsement at the ...


2

The simplest way to answer this is to have your friend call an AME in the city they intend on training and ask them if they feel they will pass the required medical for a CPL. AME's are pretty forthcoming about this kind of stuff and they will often give you an idea over the phone if they feel there is a real issue. AME's are also the ONLY people that can ...


2

If you are in the U.S., Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.3 requires you to have a Student Pilot Certificate in order to solo an aircraft. You have to solo an aircraft in order to get a Private Pilot Certificate per Part 61.109. There is no economical way of going from no pilot certificate to a private pilot certificate without getting a ...


1

You can Solo at 16, but need to be 17 to get a license. So, that gives you a year to practice, and study up to pass the Knowledge exam if you plan to start now and get your license at 17. One of the first steps is to log in here, https://medxpress.faa.gov/medxpress/login.aspx and then find an Aviation Medical Examiner so you can get a Class III Medical. ...


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