30

The FAA doesn't consider adding oil to be maintenance. The Hochberg (2016) interpretation says: The subject of adding oil is often debated; however, we note that it is not an item included in part 43, appendix A, paragraph (c), which lists items the FAA considers to be preventive maintenance. Also see the FAA's Flight Standards Information Management ...


20

The FAA allows pilots to do maintenance themselves. It’s outlined in the following doc from the FAA as well as the full regulation here. I would say engine oil falls under: Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.


18

The trick my CFI taught me is to use your Course Deviation Indicator or ADF to keep track of landings. After your first landing, bug a course of 010. After your second landing, bug 020. You can reach over and adjust the knob after every landing without having to juggle a pen and a notebook. It's still a manual step, though. You could also use a product like ...


15

You are sort of correct. For the ground instruction for your basic Private Pilot Certificate, it would not really matter. For the actual flight instruction, the CFI has to be certificated for the category and class of aircraft in which you are being trained by them. If the aircraft is a taildragger, high performance, and/or complex aircraft, the CFI will ...


15

The other answers have provided some easy ways to increment your count without too much distraction, but if you are really "prone to forget [...] when things get busy" as you say, this might not be good enough. I would therefore recommend a solution which does not require any action on your side. Most smartphones today have a pressure sensor. There ...


12

Get a Tally Counter, and push the button once per landing. No batteries, nothing to fail, easy to use. Not much more you could ask for. https://tallycounterstore.com/finger-tally-counter-quantity-discounts/ There are even options for mounted ones. https://tallycounterstore.com/mounted-tally-counter/


8

Sounds like a Forward Slip. It is not an unusual maneuver. It is very useful in order to descend faster than normal (Vertical Speed) without increasing your airspeed. The maneuver reduces the amount of lift generated while at the same time creating a large amount of drag by presenting the broad side of the fuselage to the relative wind. Did the instructor ...


7

(Disclaimer: I'm not a pro at all, I don't even have any license yet) If you do indeed have a smartphone with you, you might consider just letting a voice recording run for the duration of your pattern work and call out your landings. When you're back on the ground, you can just listen through the recording and count the landings. This might also have ...


7

I can't find a reference to link, but in the transport world, adding oil comes under the category of "replenishment", and is the same as adding fuel or topping off a reservoir that is crew-accessible. Many corporate aircraft have oil replenishment systems for servicing engine oil, intended to be usable by the flight crew. On the CRJ regional ...


4

While the aircraft that you buy could conceivably require your CFI to possess certain additional ratings, such as if you purchase a twin-engine plane or a jet, most smaller, single-engine, prop planes will be covered under your CFI’s Single Engine Land (SEL) rating.


4

Of which type of pilot are you asking: Student Military Private (hobbyist) Corporate Airline I will be using the term licensed to loosely mean certificated, current, and proficient with the proper endorsements and documentations. The short answer is no. They are not obliged/obligated to fly the same aircraft. The pilot can choose to fly in any aircraft ...


3

You have a bit of a misconception about the way these things work. Everyone gets a student pilot's license before they get a private pilot's license. The student license is just a step along the way to the private license. The requirements for getting a student pilot's license are minimal. It's the equivalent of a "learner's permit" in the automobile ...


3

Almost every calculator can be converted into counter just by typing something like 1 + = (and then every time you press = the value is incremented). This can be used if you need aircraft instruments for the training itself instead.


3

Pace count beads, which are just some beads on a rope that doesn't let them readily move, would work well if you want to keep track while in the air.


3

Yes, but. With one notable exception, for any pilot to legally fly an aircraft, they must be rated for that category and class of aircraft. Some (generally larger) types of aircraft also require a type rating. So, if you purchased a Cessna 172 (a very common primary trainer), your CFI would need to be rated for Airplane category, Single Engine Land class (...


2

Easy, peasy. Fill out a label/sticker with the endorsement printed on it. Then, all you have to do is sign it and place your CFI number on it. You can then either scan it or take a photo of it. Your student can upload the scanned document or photo into an electronic logbook. If they do not have an electronic logbook, they can print out the endorsement at the ...


2

The simplest way to answer this is to have your friend call an AME in the city they intend on training and ask them if they feel they will pass the required medical for a CPL. AME's are pretty forthcoming about this kind of stuff and they will often give you an idea over the phone if they feel there is a real issue. AME's are also the ONLY people that can ...


2

I use my ADF. Set the frequency to 1000 when I start, bump it by one for each landing. (Might as well use it for SOMETHING!)


2

If you are in the U.S., Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.3 requires you to have a Student Pilot Certificate in order to solo an aircraft. You have to solo an aircraft in order to get a Private Pilot Certificate per Part 61.109. There is no economical way of going from no pilot certificate to a private pilot certificate without getting a ...


1

You can Solo at 16, but need to be 17 to get a license. So, that gives you a year to practice, and study up to pass the Knowledge exam if you plan to start now and get your license at 17. One of the first steps is to log in here, https://medxpress.faa.gov/medxpress/login.aspx and then find an Aviation Medical Examiner so you can get a Class III Medical. ...


1

Welcome to AviationStackExchange. The question that you asked is definitely not a question that solicits fact based answers. Something that is usually frowned upon on this question and answer forum. Hence the down-votes and close-votes from others. My answer (as well as any answer to this question) will be very biased and opinion based. In answering this ...


1

One might consider reading books about aviation weather. Weather Flying by Robert Buck is timeless, and is good for VFR and IFR flight. All my primary and instrument students read it. I cannot remember any student complaining about having assigned reading in that book. One way is to start by looking at the PROG charts about two days in advance and ...


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