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6

Well, pretty much anything can be given a US airworthiness certificate provided it's not literally falling to pieces. You could certificate such an aircraft as a Special Airworthiness Certificate in the Experimental category -- Specifically one of: Experimental -- Research and Development To conduct aircraft operations as a matter of research or to ...


4

These cutaways are just general representations of what structural components go into the aircraft; they are NOT engineering drawings nor should they be used as such. In general the OEMs and the engineering departments for the airlines are pretty sensitive about releasing engineering data for proprietary reasons. If you are working on a product closely ...


4

Having been involved with several FAA STC's for GA and airliners I can pass on my experience. Additional FAA information is available in FAR part 21, 23, 125 and here. First, transport, airliner's, etc are not held to the same rules. The FAA generally considers the engineering department of aircraft manufactures such as Cessna, Boeing or Aerobus to know ...


3

Not a solution, but I looked at this a couple years ago. I have a 2005 172R G1000 in a flight school and students tend to go to the 180hp planes, so I looked into the upgrade. I did find that Cessna did a STC for a limited, sequential group of Serial Number 172R G1000's. I believe they might have been done for Embry Riddle, but not positive. I actually ...


3

The FAA has a nice checklist here. You should read through the FAA's GUIDE FOR OBTAINING A SUPPLEMENTAL TYPE CERTIFICATE. I assume you are a civilian but, This advisory circular (AC) is a certification guide for obtaining a supplemental type certificate (STC). It is intended for civilian applicants only. We have written it to help designers, ...


3

This sounds like a case where I would contact the STC holder and ask them what's up. In the USA I'm used to seeing STCs with the magic words or later approved revisions (which means that the manufacturer can revise the document and get it re-approved without needing a new STC), but if a specific revision is called out and those magic words aren't present ...


3

Not practically speaking no. With sufficient engineering data you could perform calculations to come up with a model for what the additive effects would be of the various modifications. The problem with the aerodynamics to horsepower relationship is that almost all of the basic calculations have exponents. So a mod that gives you 5 knots over a given '...


2

I was many years at an OEM, in tech support engineering, and I'm not aware of any requirement to notify the OEM when someone applies for an STC. You have to remember that many STCs are for airplanes who's manufacturers disappeared long ago, so you really can't make that a basic requirement. It's possible however, that the FAA may request OEM input like an ...


1

It tends to go on a case by case basis. OEMs tend to steer clear of STC developers because OEM involvement tends to drag the OEM into an implied commitment to support the STC itself, or support the STC's secondary effects on how the airplane is operated, that the OEM would rather not be stuck with. What will happen is an STC developer will submit a ...


1

Since this is an aircraft for personal use, is under 19,000lbs gross weight, and less than 19 seats it will fall under Part 23. If you don't plan on selling "kits" to do these modifications, then an STC is not required. STC's are only for modifications intended for sale to aircraft for installation by an A&P mechanic. STC's are required not for the kit ...


1

I'm just making this up as I go along, so your mileage may vary. Also I'm only dealing with the drag-reducing mods. It seems this method ought to give a conservative estimate of the combined speed gains. For each mod, seperately, calculate a "drag coefficient reduction factor" equal to stock airspeed squared divided by promised airspeed squared. The ...


1

Unless I am reading the document incorrectly, EASA and the FAA have a reciprocity agreement since 2011 recognizing each other's findings and approvals. That means an FAA STC approval is good in EASA countries (except the ones that are not EU members) and vice-versa.


1

If the aircraft you import to the US was certified by country that the US has a aviation bilateral agreement with (https://www.faa.gov/aircraft/air_cert/international/bilateral_agreements/baa_basa_listing/) your ability to import the aircraft would be improved and much easier because the BASA (Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement) among many things recognizes ...


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