12

In the same way than an aircraft will build static charge on the wings from friction with the air, the same thing can happen with helicopters from fast moving blades. From a 1962 US Army document: Any aircraft flying in the atmosphere can be considered as a conductive body located in a highly electrically insulated environment. In such a body, ...


10

Static wicks are mostly found on aircraft that fly in Instrument Meteorological Conditions because static charges typically build up when flying in precipitation, not in clear air. So you won't find static wicks on helicopters that are certified only for visual conditions, like the R-22, R-44, Bell 206, piston Enstroms, etc., but you will find static wicks ...


5

Many aircraft tyres conduct electricity which also dissipates charges. The compound contains "carbon black" or graphites. In the special case of helicopters using a hook to pick up a load from a hover, the wise ground handler will use a rod on the end of a grounded cable to earth the charge. Helicopters can build up a lot of static and many a ground ...


5

I work for a Christmas tree farm and we harvest our trees out of the field using a helicopter. I am the hook man and attach the bundle of trees to the heli, then he takes them to another location. In that breif trip during a rain storm, or even a foggy day static charge will build resulting in a very unpleasant shock. Sometimes bad enough it will contract ...


5

I am a Naval Aviator and as part of my water survival training, I was deposited by boat off the coast of Florida and picked up by helicopter. It was a huge point of emphasis that we let the helicopter's rescue hook touch the water to discharge any built up static before we touched it. No one in my class grabbed it before it hit the water, so I can't ...


4

I was struck in the forehead in 1983 from the discharge off a CH-53. I was wearing a kelvar helmet which was split down the middle from the strike, heart rate slowed down to 4 beats a minute thought I was a gone. I was stationed at camp Pendleton USMC when it happened.


4

Helicopters in normal weather will build up a static charge, just ask any ground crew for a logging helicopter. Normally the hook will be grounded by dropping it on the ground before the hooker will touch it. Or a grounding rod will be used to neutralize the static charge.


4

The noise is created by sparks caused by static electricity. As the aircraft flies through the air, it picks up electrons from the air molecules. This extra charge will want to flow back into the air to equalize the charge. Small gaps in the conductive path on the aircraft will cause sparks to form. These sparks cause noise on radio frequencies, which can be ...


4

When fueling a grounded connection is established. Or at the very least the fuel tank is electrically bonded to the aircraft before the fuel line is connected by a clamp on a post on the landing gear.


3

No, it is not. To use electricity to do work, you need: two thigns with stable potential difference, large amount of charge and good electrical connection to both terminals And static electricity does not really give you either: the amount of static electricity collected depends significantly on atmospheric conditions, the total charge collected is tiny ...


1

Static electricity buildup could affect communications. Static wicks on trailing edges of flaps, ailerons, rudder, elevator dissipate the static electricity. I would imagine drones could be mostly fiberglass construction, so some additional details need to go into construction to provide a path for the electricity to flow, vs an all metal craft where the ...


1

Static electricity is accumulation of charges over surface. During flight air frame of aircraft is exposed to the air and collision takes place between air molecules and air-frame which lead to development of electric charges over the air-frame. In my opinion water molecules on air-frame are also cause of static charge as water is slightly polar molecule it ...


1

Yes they do. I was involved in many HDSs (Helicopter Delivery Service) and would earth the Helo with a sheperds crook and trailing copper linkage - often getting a visible spark. I also took part in the rescue of a few dozen (memory fades on how many) crew from a bombed ship with no hook and earthed the helo myself - yes it hurt.


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